Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

God Unbound: Wisdom from Galatians for the Anxious Church

Elaine Heath

(Yes, this book came out earlier this month, but somehow it slipped past us, and deserves to be noted here, even if we are late in doing so.)

Listen to an interview with the author about the book

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

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Imagining a Better Form of Justice

 
A Review of

Executing Grace:
How the Death Penalty Killed Jesus and Why It’s Killing Us
Shane Claiborne

Paperback: HarperOne, 2016
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

Reviewed by Douglas Graves

 

Over the years, Shane Claiborne’s work and voice for social justice issues have challenged many in the church to reconsider the role of faith in their everyday lives. His latest book, Executing Grace: How the Death Penalty Killed Jesus and Why It’s Killing Us, is written in the same vein and certainly has the power to change many Christians’ perspectives on capital punishment. Surprisingly, the book has quite an optimistic ending, encouraging readers that the death penalty is on the run. But Claiborne does much more than simply dismiss any legitimacy still given to the death penalty. By telling stories of individuals behind the numbers and offering a refreshing view of God’s character and his expression of grace, Claiborne invites his readers to imagine a more fulfilling form of justice.

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Here are 5 essential ebooks on sale now that are worth checking out:
( Ta-Nehisi Coates, Robert Putnam, Azar Nafisi, MORE)

Via our sister website Thrifty Christian Reader
To keep up with all the latest ebook deals,
be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook

  

Between the World and Me

Ta-Nehisi Coates
*** $5.99 ***

This 2015 National Book Award winner
is essential reading!

NEXT EBOOK >>>>>

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It’s time for a new batch of really bad Christian book covers…

 

Here are 10 lousy Christian covers from 2016

(Some of these appeared first on LousyBookCovers.com or Kindle Cover Disasters…)

Enjoy, and share these with your friends!

 

 

Virginia Kay: A Life of Wonder

 

From the book description:
“As she opened her eyes to a brand new day, Virginia was aware that this was the day that the Lord had made, and she was convinced that all would be fine.Then she realized that once again she had to face that awful rat and his intense desire to mortify her.”

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A Prophet in His Hometown

 
A Review of

Kierkegaard: A Christian Missionary to Christians
Mark Tietjen

Paperback: IVP Academic, 2016
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 

Reviewed by Michial Farmer

 

If it’s true that we become like what we worship, readers of Søren Kierkegaard must always keep in mind that his God was inscrutable, labyrinthine-minded, confounding, terrifying—but ultimately loving. So, too, is Kierkegaard’s jungle of writings. Producing two or three treatises simultaneously, under different (though equally ridiculous) pseudonyms, he was not afraid of self-contradiction and sought controversy more than agreement. If he could find no one else to disagree with him, he’d do it himself. It’s the rare reader indeed who can open the puzzle box of his thought without an instruction manual. And yet, as Mark Tietjen shows in his latest book, Kierkegaard: A Christian Missionary to Christians, Kierkegaard wrote what he wrote (and wrote it the way he wrote it) as an act of service.

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I have been on the road for the last couple of weeks with my Slow Church co-author John Pattison, talking with churches throughout the southeastern U.S. about that book and my new book, Reading for the Common Good.  It’s been good to get the new book into people’s hands and to begin conversations about it.

Reading for the Common Good: How Books Help Our Churches and Neighborhoods Flourish
C. Christopher Smith

Paperback: IVP Books, 2016
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle

 

I am deeply grateful for these great reviews of the book that have been posted within the last couple of weeks. Here are some clips (with links to the full reviews)…

Joe Johnson:

“Working for the flourishing of churches, neighborhoods, and the world cannot be done without the empowering work of the Holy Spirit, and I think it’s a reasonable proposal to argue that reading is an important means by which the Spirit works. Reading for the Common Good makes a very interesting case for the communal importance of reading and conversation, and it paints a portrait of what local church life can be like that is well worth pursuing. I recommend it.”
[ Read the full review ]

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“Do all the good you can.”

A Review of 

Organic Wesley:
A Christian Perspective on Food, Farming, and Faith
William Guerrant, Jr.

Paperback: Seedbed, 2015
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 

Reviewed by Michelle Wilbert

 

Over the last thirty years, from roughly 1990-2016, the world has seen a veritable explosion of new—or renewed—social, political and spiritual movements that have sought to reclaim and rejuvenate ideas about the intersection of health, fitness, environmental sustainability and spirituality. Most of them are centered on centuries old models that have been resurrected and updated with new information and research combined with technological advances that have allowed us to share information on a mass scale—we can communicate across the globe in a matter of seconds and what a contrast from the18th century of John Wesley and his ministry as recounted in William Guerrant, Jr.’s delightful book, Organic Wesley: A Christian Perspective on Food, Farming and Faith.  One can only wonder at John Wesley–the Anglican cleric who founded the Methodist movement—on foot or on horseback, traversing the far corners of England promoting his message of personal holiness that included a powerful belief that a Christian had an obligation to preserve and maintain their physical health and well being through a healthy and simple diet, ample exercise, appropriate rest and recreation “in the open air” and all the better to be fit to serve and minister to others.

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Donald_Trump

The Unexamined Life and Politics of Donald Trump

 

C. Christopher Smith

 
Donald Trump’s inclination to not read books has been highlighted in two recently published articles. Tony Schwartz, the ghostwriter who collaborated with Trump on his bestselling book, The Art of the Deal, was recently interviewed in The New Yorker, expressing his deep regrets for “presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is.”

Schwartz emphasized Trump’s inability to concentrate and his apparent lack of an attention span, and then proceeds to draw a connection between that and Trump’s seeming avoidance of reading books:

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Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

A Woman’s Place: A Christian Vision for Your Calling in the Office, the Home, and the World

Katelyn Beaty

Listen to an interview with the author about the book

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

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Can the Original be Reimagined?

 
A Feature Review of 
 

Vinegar Girl: A Novel
Anne Tyler

Paperback: Hogarth Books, 2016
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 
Reviewed by Cara Meredith

 
 

Yesterday afternoon, my son and I snuggled together at the local movie theater for the newly released Pixar feature, Finding Dory. While Dory – who might just be my spirit animal – did not disappoint, I couldn’t help but wonder about most of the preview trailers. Could Ghostbusters, Adventures in Babysitting and Pete’s Dragon, all favorites of mine from the late 70’s and 80’s, actually be reimagined into something better than the original?

I scanned the darkened room, hoping to lock eyes with another parent who understood my dilemma. But I was alone. The rest of the audience did as they were supposed to do: they stared straight ahead at the screen, absorbed in the entertainment.

It’s the same for us today.

You see, I can’t help but ask a similar question of Anne Tyler’s newest release, Vinegar Girl: can the original, a modernized retelling of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, really be improved upon?

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