Poetry

Daily Poetry Devotional for Lent 2021 – Week 6

Poetry Devotional Lent 2021

For the season of Lent, we offer a daily devotional based on a scripture reading for that day (RCL Daily Readings) and a poem that is relevant to that passage of scripture. In the traditional 40-day format of Lent, we offer these meditations for six days each week (no Sundays). 

We offer in this series a broad selection of classic and contemporary poems from diverse poets that stir our imaginations with thoughts of how the biblical text speaks to us in the twenty-first century.

“Many of us find it hard to give ourselves permission to pause, to sit still, to reflect or meditate or pray in the midst of daily occupations … We need the explicit invitation the liturgical year provides to change pace, to curtail our busyness a bit, to make our times with self and God, a little more spacious, a little more leisurely, and see what comes.”
 – Marilyn McEntyre,
Where the Eye Alights


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Daily Poetry Devotional Lent 2021
Week 6

<<<<< Last Week’s Poems
  
  
 [ Thurs. 3/25 ]   [ Fri. 3/26 ] [ Sat. 3/27 ]   [ Mon. 3/29 ] [ Tues. 3/30 ]  [ Wed. 3/31 ] [ Thurs 4/1 ] [ Fri 4/2 ]
[ Sat 4/3 ]

 
 

Day 32
Thurs March 25

 
 

Phil. 2:1-11:

Therefore if you have any encouragement from being united with Christ, if any comfort from his love, if any common sharing in the Spirit, if any tenderness and compassion, then make my joy complete by being like-minded, having the same love, being one in spirit and of one mind. Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others.

In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus:

Who, being in very naturea]”>[a] God,
    did not consider equality with God something to be used to his own advantage;
rather, he made himself nothing
    by taking the very nature  of a servant,
    being made in human likeness.
And being found in appearance as a man,
    he humbled himself
    by becoming obedient to death—
        even death on a cross!

Therefore God exalted him to the highest place
    and gave him the name that is above every name,
10 that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow,
    in heaven and on earth and under the earth,
11 and every tongue acknowledge that Jesus Christ is Lord,
    to the glory of God the Father.

 
 

Love’s Choice
Malcolm Guite

SNIPPET:


Yet this is how He comes. Through wine and bread
Love chooses to be emptied into me.
He does not come in unimagined light
Too bright to be denied, too absolute
For consciousness, too strong for sight,
Leaving the seer blind, the poet mute,
Chooses instead to seep into each sense,
To dye himself into experience.

READ THE FULL POEM ]

 
 

NEXT DAY >>>>>>

IMAGE CREDIT: Temptation in the Wilderness.
Painting by Briton Riviere (1898)

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