Classic Horror Novels – ERB Library of FREE Ebooks [Kindle/More]

October 30, 2013

 

Classic Horror Novels

 
 

This is the latest post in a series that will, in effect, create a library of classics that are available as free ebooks.
 
Last week’s post: [ Children’s Literature ] 1st post in this series: [ Classics of Ancient History ]

This week we focus on Classic Horror Novels. We have selected the following books as recommended reading.

In 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.


[easyazon-image align=”none” asin=”B0084BN44Q” locale=”us” height=”333″ src=”http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41E8HG%2Br0qL.jpg” width=”222″]
 
[easyazon-link asin=”B0084BN44Q” locale=”us”]Frankenstein[/easyazon-link]
 
By Mary W. Shelley
 
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(via Project Gutenberg)
 
Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel written by Mary Shelley about eccentric scientist Victor Frankenstein, who creates a grotesque creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Shelley started writing the story when she was nineteen, and the novel was published when she was twenty-one. The first edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley’s name appears on the second edition, published in France in 1823.  (Wikipedia)
[easyazon-image align=”none” asin=”B0084B5TK8″ locale=”us” height=”333″ src=”http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41wpu%2BXKLAL.jpg” width=”222″]
 
[easyazon-link asin=”B0084B5TK8″ locale=”us”]Dracula[/easyazon-link]
 
By Bram Stoker

 
FREE Alt.Kindle/Nook/Other Eds.
(via Project Gutenberg)
 
The tale begins with Jonathan Harker, a newly qualified English solicitor, journeying by train and carriage from England to Count Dracula’s crumbling, remote castle (situated in the Carpathian Mountains on the border of Transylvania, Bukovina, and Moldavia). The purpose of his mission is to provide legal support to Dracula for a real estate transaction overseen by Harker’s employer, Peter Hawkins, of Exeter in England. At first enticed by Dracula’s gracious manner, Harker soon discovers that he has become a prisoner in the castle. He also begins to see disquieting facets of Dracula’s nocturnal life. One night while searching for a way out of the castle, and against Dracula’s strict admonition not to venture outside his room at night, Harker falls under the spell of three wanton female vampires, Brides of Dracula (referred to only as “the sisters” in the novel). He is saved at the last second by the Count, because he wants to keep Harker alive just long enough to obtain needed legal advice and teachings about England and London (Dracula’s planned travel destination so as to be among the “teeming millions”). After the preparations are made, Dracula leaves the castle and abandons Harker to the brides. He barely escapes from the castle with his life.  (Wikipedia)

 

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