News, VOLUME 11

Ten Theology Books to Watch For – Nov. 2018

Here are a some excellent theology* books that will be released this month:

* broadly interpreted, including ethics, church history, biblical studies, and other areas that intersect with theology

See a book here that you’d like to review for us?
Contact us, and we’ll talk about the possibility of a review.

 

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[easyazon_link identifier=”0310597250″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Justification: Two-Volume Set (New Studies in Dogmatics)[/easyazon_link] 

Michael Horton

Zondervan

The doctrine of justification stands at the center of our systematic reflection on the meaning of salvation as well as our piety, mission, and life together. In his two-volume work on the doctrine of justification, Michael Horton seeks not simply to repeat noble doctrinal formulas and traditional proof texts, but to encounter the remarkable biblical justification texts in conversation with the provocative proposals that, despite a wide range of differences, have reignited the contemporary debates around justification.

Volume 1 engages in a descriptive task – an exercise in historical theology exploring the doctrine of justification from the patristic era to the Reformation. Broadening the scope, Horton explores patristic discussions of justification under the rubric of the “great exchange.” He provides a map for contemporary discussions of justification, identifying and engaging his principal interlocutors: Origen, Chrysostom, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, William of Ockham, Gabriel Biel, and the magisterial reformers. Observing the assimilation of justification to the doctrine of penance in medieval theology, especially via Peter Lombard, the work studies the transformations of the doctrine through Aquinas, Scotus and the nominalists leading up to the era of the Reformation and the Council of Trent. He concludes his first study by examining the hermeneutical and theological significance of the Reformers’ understanding of the law and the gospel and the resultant covenantal scheme that became formative in Reformed theology. This then opens the door to the constructive task of volume 2 – to investigate the biblical doctrine of justification in light of contemporary exegesis. Here Horton takes up the topic of justification from biblical-theological, exegetical, and systematic-theological vantage points, engaging significantly with contemporary debates in biblical, especially Pauline, scholarship. Horton shows that the doctrine of justification finds its most ecumenically-significant starting point and proper habitat in union with Christ, where the greatest consensus, past and present, is to be found among Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Protestant theologies. At the same time, he proposes that the union with Christ motif achieves its clearest and most consistent articulation in forensic justification. The final chapter locates justification within the broader framework of union with Christ.



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[easyazon_link identifier=”0814684181″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]A Theology of Conversation: An Introduction to David Tracy[/easyazon_link] 

Stephen Okey

Liturgical Press

Sometimes described as “a theologian’s theologian,” David Tracy’s scholarship has impacted countless thinkers around the globe. The complexity of his thought, however, has often made engaging his work into a daunting challenge. Combining analysis of the most influential features of Tracy’s theology (theological method, the religious classic, public theology) with a retrieval of his more overlooked interests (Christology, God), Stephen Okey presents the essential themes of Tracy’s career in accessible and insightful prose.

“The breadth and depth of David Tracy’s theological scholarship and understanding is breathtaking for those who want to grasp the complexity of contemporary culture and its religious dimensions. Stephen Okey’s A Theology of Conversation provides a clear and solidly researched guide through the many developments in Tracy’s work. By focusing both on the prominent themes in Tracy’s theology, as well as the chronological development of those themes throughout the entire corpus of Tracy’s writings, Okey has admirably given all of us a guide to David Tracy’s thinking and introduced his work to the next generation of those who want to understand what theology is all about.”
– John McCarthy, Loyola University Chicago

 

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