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Spring 2022 – Most Anticipated Books for Christian Readers!

Fall 2021 Most Anticipated Books

The first half of 2022 promises a ton of excellent new books! Here are 50 of our most anticipated books of Spring 2022 for Christian Readers…

These anticipated books of Spring 2022 (released in the first half of the year) wrestle with some of the deepest challenges of our day, and will guide us toward faithful living in the present and in years to come.

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[ TOP 10 – Part 1 ]   [ Top 10 – Part 2 ]
[ Literature ] [ NonFiction ]
[ Church ]  [ Formation ]
[ Theology ] [ Young Readers ]
[ Coming This Fall ]

Page 2: TOP 10 – Part 2

(In Alphabetical Order by Author’s Last Name)

Do I Stay Christian?: A Guide for the Doubters, the Disappointed, and the Disillusioned

Brian McLaren

(St. Martins, May 2022)

“Any thoughtful Christian has been asking the questions McLaren tackles here, but many of us are afraid to voice them aloud. In Do I Stay Christian? we’re gifted a gentle guide who opens ideas and voices the questions we cannot, naming our frustration, fear, and hesitant hope.”
―Rev. Dr. Amy Butler, former Senior Minister, The Riverside Church

Do I Stay Christian? addresses in public the powerful question that surprising numbers of people―including pastors, priests, and other religious leaders―are asking in private. Picking up where Faith After Doubt leaves off, Do I Stay Christian? is not McLaren’s attempt to persuade Christians to dig in their heels or run for the exit. Instead, he combines his own experience with that of thousands of people who have confided in him over the years to help readers make a responsible, honest, ethical decision about their religious identity.

There is a way to say both yes and no to the question of staying Christian, McLaren says, by shifting the focus from whether we stay Christian to how we stay human. If Do I Stay Christian? is the question you’re asking―or if it’s a question that someone you love is asking―this is the book you’ve been waiting for.

I Guess I Haven’t Learned That Yet: Discovering New Ways of Living When the Old Ways Stop Working

Shauna Niequist

(Zondervan, April 2022)

A clear-eyed look at what happens when everything we’ve been clinging to falls apart–what we keep, what we let go, and how we’re transformed along the way.

Just after her fortieth birthday, New York Times bestselling author Shauna Niequist found herself in a season of chaos, change, and loss unlike anything she’d ever experienced. She discovered that many of the beliefs and practices that had been useful up to that point no longer worked. After trying–and failing–to pull herself back up using the same old tools, she realized she required new ones: courage, curiosity, compassion, and self-compassion. She discovered the way through was more about questions than answers, more about forgiveness than force, more about tenderness than trying hard.

I Guess I Haven’t Learned That Yet is a journey of both unlearning what is no longer helpful, embracing curiosity, and accepting the unknowns of midlife, heartbreak, and chronic pain. Niequist writes with characteristic candor and grace about the challenges and delights of a move from the Midwest to Manhattan, and also the challenges and delights of releasing our expectations for how we thought our lives would look.

Follow Niequist on her journey to understand grief, to reshape her faith, to practice courage when all she wanted to do was hide. This is a book about learning how to live in a new city, learning how to get back up, and learning how to trust God’s goodness in a deeper way.

Churches and the Crisis of Decline: A Hopeful, Practical Ecclesiology for a Secular Age
Andrew Root

(Baker Academic, Feb. 2022)

ongregations often seek to combat the crisis of decline by using innovation to produce new resources. But leading practical theologian Andrew Root shows that the church’s crisis is not in the loss of resources; it’s in the loss of life–and that life can only return when we remain open to God’s encountering presence.

This new book, related to Root’s critically acclaimed Ministry in a Secular Age project, addresses the practical form the church must take in a secular age. Root uses two stories to frame the book: one about a church whose building becomes a pub and the other about Karl Barth. Root argues that Barth should be understood as a pastor with a deep practical theology that can help church leaders today.

This book pushes the church to be a waiting community that recognizes that the only way for it to find life is to stop seeing the church as the star of its own story. Instead of resisting decline, congregations must remain open to divine action. Root offers a rich vision for the church’s future that moves away from an obsession with relevance and resources and toward the living God.

From Isolation to Community: A Renewed Vision for Christian Life Together
Myles Werntz

(Baker Academic, April 2022)

It is no secret that isolation is one of the key ailments of our age. But less explored is the way the church as it is frequently practiced contributes to this isolation instead of offering an alternative. With the help of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, this book argues for a renewed vision of the church community as a theological therapy to cultural, moral, and sociological isolation. It offers an account of how familiar church practices, such as Scripture reading, worship, prayer, and eating, contribute to community formation in the body of Christ.

The Scandal of Holiness: Renewing Your Imagination in the Company of Literary Saints

Jessica Hooten Wilson

(Brazos Press, March 2022)

How do we become better people? Initiatives such as New Year’s resolutions, vision boards, thirty-day plans, and self-help books often fail to compel us to live differently. We settle for small goals–frugal spending, less yelling at the kids, more time at the gym–but we are called to something far greater. We are created to be holy.

Award-winning author Jessica Hooten Wilson explains that learning to hear the call of holiness requires cultivating a new imagination–one rooted in the act of reading. Learning to read with eyes attuned to the saints who populate great works of literature moves us toward holiness, where God opens up a way of living that extends far beyond what we can conjure for ourselves. Literature has the power to show us what a holy life looks like, and these depictions often scandalize even as they shape our imagination. As such, careful reading becomes a sort of countercultural spiritual discipline.

The book includes devotionals, prayers, wisdom from the saints, and more to help individuals and groups cultivate a saintly imagination.

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