Top 10 New Audiobooks! [May 2018]

May 18, 2018

 

Audiobooks are a great way to enjoy books while you are on the go!

 
While these audiobooks are available through Audible.com, we encourage you to check for them at your local library, where you may be able to listen to them for FREE!
 

If you find yourself regularly purchasing audiobooks from Audible, you might want to sign up for a subscription,
$14.95/month, plus two FREE audiobooks for signing up!

 

[ SIGN UP NOW ]

 
Here are the best audiobooks that will be released this month…
(Some of these are new books, others are older books just released as audiobooks)

   [easyazon_image align=”center” height=”500″ identifier=”B07C88MXG2″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/51B92WMnIoL.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”500″]

[easyazon_link identifier=”B07C88MXG2″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness[/easyazon_link]

Austin Channing Brown

Read By: The Author

 

From a leading new voice on racial justice, an eye-opening account of what it’s like to grow up black, Christian, and female in white America, in this idea-driven memoir about how her determined quest for identity and understanding shows a way forward for us all.

Austin Channing Brown’s first encounter with a racialized America came at age seven, when she discovered her parents named her Austin to deceive future employers into thinking she was a white man. Growing up in majority-white schools, organizations, and churches, Austin writes, “I had to learn what it means to love blackness”, a journey that led to a lifetime spent navigating America’s racial divide as a writer, speaker, and expert who helps organizations practice genuine inclusion.

In a time when nearly all institutions (schools, churches, universities, businesses) claim to value “diversity” in their mission statements, I’m Still Here is a powerful account of how and why our actions so often fall short of our words. Austin writes in breathtaking detail about her journey to self-worth and the pitfalls that kill our attempts at racial justice, in stories that bear witness to the complexity of America’s social fabric – from Black Cleveland neighborhoods to private schools in the middle-class suburbs, from prison walls to the boardrooms at majority-white organizations.

For readers who have engaged with America’s legacy on race through the writing of Ta-Nehisi Coates and Michael Eric Dyson, I’m Still Here is an illuminating look at how white, middle-class Evangelicalism has participated in an era of rising racial hostility, inviting the reader to confront apathy, recognize God’s ongoing work in the world, and discover how blackness – if we let it – can save us all.

[ [easyazon_link identifier=”B07C88MXG2” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Buy Now[/easyazon_link] ]

 






[easyazon_image align=”center” height=”500″ identifier=”B079TX8ZDR” locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/61BYnlwiOTL.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”500″]

[easyazon_link identifier=”B079TX8ZDR” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Barracoon: The Story of the Last Black Cargo[/easyazon_link]

Zora Neale Hurston

Read by:  Robin Miles

 

A major literary event: a never-before-published work from the author of the American classic Their Eyes Were Watching God that brilliantly illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of one of the last known survivors of the Atlantic slave trade – abducted from Africa on the last “Black Cargo” ship to arrive in the United States.

In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview 86-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation’s history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo’s firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage 50 years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States.

In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo’s past – memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War.

Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo’s unique vernacular, and written from Hurston’s perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the 20th-century, Barracoon brilliantly illuminates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.

[ [easyazon_link identifier=”BB079TX8ZDR” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Buy Now[/easyazon_link] ]

 

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