Ten Theology Books to Watch For – Sept. 2017

September 14, 2017 — Leave a comment

 

Here are a some excellent theology* books that will be released this month:

* broadly interpreted, including ethics, church history, biblical studies, and other areas that intersect with theology

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Ecowomanism: African American Women and Earth-Honoring Faiths

Melanie Harris

Orbis Books

Scholarship on African American history and culture has often neglected the tradition of African American women who engage in theological and religious reflection on their ethical and moral responsibility to care for the earth. Melanie Harris argues that African American women make distinctive contributions to the environmental justice movement in the ways that they theologize, theorize, practice spiritual activism, and come into religious understandings about our relationship with the earth. Incorporating elements of her family history to set the stage for her argument, Harris intersperses her academic reflections with her own personal stories and anecdotes.

This unique text stands at the intersection of several academic disciplines: womanist theology, eco-theology, spirituality, and theological aesthetics.

 

 

 

Was the Reformation a Mistake?: Why Catholic Doctrine Is Not Unbiblical

Matthew Levering

Zondervan

Was the Reformation a mistake?

In its actual historical context, it hardly seems fair to call the Reformation a “mistake.” In 1517, the Church was in need of a spiritual and theological reform. The issues raised by Renaissance humanism – and by the profound corruption of the Church’s leaders, the Avignon papacy, and the Great Schism in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries – lingered unresolved. What were key theological problems that led to the Reformation?

Theologian Matthew Levering helps readers see these questions from a Catholic perspective. Surveying nine key themes – Scripture, Mary, Eucharist, Monasticism, Justification and Merit, Saints Priesthood, and Scripture – he examines the positions of Martin Luther and makes a case that the Catholic position is biblically defensible once one allows for the variety of biblically warranted modes of interpreting Scripture. At the same time, Levering makes clear that he cannot “prove” the Catholic case.

 

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