Ten Theology Books to Watch For – March 2019

March 18, 2019 — Leave a comment

 

Here are some excellent theology* books that will be released this month:

* broadly interpreted, including ethics, church history, biblical studies, and other areas that intersect with theology

See a book here that you’d like to review for us?
Contact us, and we’ll talk about the possibility of a review.

    [easyazon_image align=”center” height=”500″ identifier=”154096003X” locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/41aBdOvOyL.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”333″]

[easyazon_link identifier=”154096003X” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Deep Focus: Film and Theology in Dialogue[/easyazon_link]

RK Johnson, C Detwiler, K Callaway

Baker Academic

Three media experts guide the Christian moviegoer into a theological conversation with movies in this up-to-date, readable introduction to Christian theology and film. Building on the success of Robert Johnston’s Reel Spirituality, the leading textbook in the field for the past 17 years, Deep Focus helps film lovers not only watch movies critically and theologically but also see beneath the surface of their moving images. The book discusses a wide variety of classic and contemporary films and is illustrated with film stills from favorite movies.

[easyazon_image align=”center” height=”500″ identifier=”0664262872″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/51oyuN2BNNvL.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”333″]

[easyazon_link identifier=”0664262872″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]How Luther Became the Reformer[/easyazon_link] 

Christine Helmer

Westminster John Knox Books

No story has been more foundational to triumphalist accounts of Western modernity than that of Martin Luther, the heroic individual, standing before the tribunes of medieval authoritarianism to proclaim his religious and intellectual freedom, “Here I stand!” How Luther Became the Reformer returns to the birthplace of this origin myth, Germany in the late nineteenth century, and traces its development from the end of World War I through the rise of National Socialism. Why were German intellectuals—especially Protestant scholars of religion, culture, and theology—in this turbulent period so committed to this version of Luther’s story? Luther was touted as the mythological figure to promote the cultural unity of Germany as a modern nation; in the myth’s many retellings, from the time of the Weimar Republic forward, Luther attained world-historical status. Helmer finds in this construction of Luther the Reformer a lens through which to examine modernity’s deformations, among them anti-Judaism, anti-Semitism, and anti-Catholicism. Offering a new interpretation of Luther, and by extension of modernity itself, from an ecumenical perspective, How Luther Became the Reformer provides resources for understanding and contesting contemporary assaults on democracy. In this way, the book holds the promise for resistance and hope in dark times.

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