Ten Theology Books to Watch For – Jan. 2019

January 17, 2019

 

Here are some excellent theology* books that will be released this month:

* broadly interpreted, including ethics, church history, biblical studies, and other areas that intersect with theology

See a book here that you’d like to review for us?
Contact us, and we’ll talk about the possibility of a review.

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[easyazon_link identifier=”0567684180″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Imitating Christ in Magwi: An Anthropological Theology[/easyazon_link] 

Todd Whitmore

T&T Clark

Imitating Christ in Magwi: An Anthropological Theology achieves two things. First, focusing on indigenous Roman Catholics in northern Uganda and South Sudan, it is a detailed ethnography of how a community sustains hope in the midst of one of the most brutal wars in recent memory, that between the Ugandan government and the rebel Lord’s Resistance Army. Whitmore finds that the belief that the spirit of Jesus Christ can enter into a person through such devotions as the Adoration of the Eucharist gave people the wherewithal to carry out striking works of mercy during the conflict, and, like Jesus of Nazareth, to risk their lives in the process. Traditional devotion leveraged radical witness.

Second, Gospel Mimesis is a call for theology itself to be a practice of imitating Christ. Such practice requires both living among people on the far margins of society – Whitmore carried out his fieldwork in Internally Displaced Persons camps – and articulating a theology that foregrounds the daily, if extraordinary, lives of people. Here, ethnography is not an add-on to theological concepts; rather, ethnography is a way of doing theology, and includes what anthropologists call “thick description” of lives of faith. Unlike theology that draws only upon abstract concepts, what Whitmore calls “anthropological theology” is consonant with the fact that God did indeed become human. It may well involve risk to one’s own life – Whitmore had to leave Uganda for three years after writing an article critical of the President – but that is what imitatio Christi sometimes requires.



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[easyazon_link identifier=”B07MVWTX1D” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Poverty in the Early Church and Today: A Conversation[/easyazon_link] 

Steve Walton /
Hannah Swithinbank, Eds.

T&T Clark

This innovative volume focuses on the significance of early Christianity for modern means of addressing poverty, by offering a rigorous study of deprivation and its alleviation in both earliest Christianity and today’s world. The contributors seek to present the complex ways in which early Christian ideas and practices relate to modern ideas and practices, and vice versa.

In this light, the book covers seven major areas of poverty and its causes, benefaction, patronage, donation, wealth and dehumanization, ‘the undeserving poor’, and responsibility. Each area features an expert in early Christianity in its Jewish and Graeco-Roman settings, paired with an expert in modern strategies for addressing poverty and benefaction; each author engages with the same topic from their respective area of expertise, and responds to their partner’s essay. Giving careful attention toboth the continuities and discontinuities between the ancient world and today, the contributors seek to inform and engage church leaders, those working in NGOs concerned with poverty, and all interested in these crucial issues, both Christian and not.

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