Ten Theology Books to Watch For – Jan. 2019

January 17, 2019

 

Here are some excellent theology* books that will be released this month:

* broadly interpreted, including ethics, church history, biblical studies, and other areas that intersect with theology

See a book here that you’d like to review for us?
Contact us, and we’ll talk about the possibility of a review.

  [easyazon_image align=”center” height=”500″ identifier=”0802872441″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/51zD5ctdkUL.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”333″]

[easyazon_link identifier=”0802872441″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]The Violence of the Biblical God[/easyazon_link] 

L. Daniel Hawk

Eerdmans

How can we make sense of violence in the Bible? Joshua commands the people of Israel to wipe out everyone in the promised land of Canaan, while Jesus commands God’s people to love their enemies. How are we to interpret biblical passages on violence when it is sanctioned at one point and condemned at another?

The Violence of the Biblical God by L. Daniel Hawk presents a new framework, solidly rooted in the authority of Scripture, for understanding the paradox of God’s participation in violence. Hawk shows how the historical narrative of the Bible offers multiple canonical pictures for faithful Christian engagement with the violent systems of the world.






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[easyazon_link identifier=”1108473148″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Expanding Responsibility for the Just War: A Feminist Critique[/easyazon_link] 

Rosemary Kellison

Cambridge UP

As demonstrated in any armed conflict, war is violent and causes grave harms to innocent persons, even when fought in compliance with just war criteria. In this book, Rosemary Kellison presents a feminist critique of just war reasoning, with particular focus on the issue of responsibility for harm to noncombatants. Contemporary just war reasoning denies the violence of war by suggesting that many of the harms caused by war are necessary, though regrettable, injuries for which inflicting agents bear no responsibility. She challenges this narrow understanding of responsibility through a feminist ethical approach that emphasizes the relationality of humans and the resulting asymmetries in their relative power and vulnerability. According to this approach, the powerful individual and collective agents who inflict harm during war are responsible for recognizing and responding to the vulnerable persons they harm, and thereby reducing the likelihood of future violence. Kellison’s volume goes beyond abstract theoretical work to consider the real implications of an important ethical problem.

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