Ten Theology Books to Watch For – February 2018

February 15, 2018 — Leave a comment


Here are a some excellent theology* books that will be released this month:

* broadly interpreted, including ethics, church history, biblical studies, and other areas that intersect with theology

See a book here that you’d like to review for us?
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Karl Barth: Post-Holocaust Theologian?

George Hunsinger, Ed.

T &T Clark


Karl Barth’s attitude toward the Jews, despite some admittedly unfortunate elements, still has much to commend it and the essays in this volume discuss this matter. The contributors examine numerous topics: the extent to which Barth compares favorably with recent post-Holocaust theologies, Barth’s position on the Jews during the Third Reich, his critique of the German-Christian Völkish church on ethical grounds. The discussion tackles Barth dialectical “Yes” to Israel’s christological “No”, it unpacks his ground-breaking exegesis of Rom. 9-11; as well as examines Barth’s rejection of the 1933 Aryan Law that formed the basis for excluding baptized Jews from Christian communities during the Third Reich. The essays also examine Barth’s later worries about Nostra Aetate, Vatican II’s landmark “Declaration on the Relation of the Church to Non-christian Religions”. This is followed by an in-depth explanation how Barth’s theology differentiated the question of religious pluralism from church’s relationship with Judaism.
This inspiring volume concludes by taking up the neglected question of Barth’s place in modern European history.



Origen: On First Principles (Oxford Early Christian Texts)

Oxford UP

On First Principles by Origen of Alexandria, written around 220-230 AD, is one of the most important and contentious works of early Christianity. It provoked controversy when written, provoked further debate when translated into Latin by Rufinus in the fourth century, and was the subject, together with its author, of condemnation in the sixth century. As a result, the work no longer survives intact in the original Greek. We only have the complete work in the Latin translation of Rufinus, and a few extensive passages preserved in Greek by being excerpted into the Philokalia of Basil of Caesarea and Gregory of Nazianzus.

John Behr provides a new edition and translation of one of the most important texts from early Christianity. He includes an invaluable introduction, which provides a clear structure of the work with significant implications for how the text is to be read and for understanding the character of theology in the early Christian tradition.


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