Ten Theology Books to Watch For – Feb. 2019

February 15, 2019 — Leave a comment

 

Here are some excellent theology* books that will be released this month:

* broadly interpreted, including ethics, church history, biblical studies, and other areas that intersect with theology

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A Theological Aesthetics of Liberation: God, Art, and the Social Outcasts 

Vincente Chong

Cascade Books

Since its emergence in the sixties of the last century, liberation theology in Latin America has paid little attention to the areas of aesthetics and art. At the same time, theological aesthetics seldom has been directly and explicitly concerned about the reality of the poor and the struggle for justice. This mutual disinterest between liberation theology and theological aesthetics is regrettable, because discerning a correlation between them would benefit both theological disciplines in their attempt to understand the saving action of God in the world. It is the intention of this book to fill that gap. A Theological Aesthetics of Liberation correlates liberation theology and theological aesthetics, exploring different themes such as the liberating power of art, and how the Spirit of God is involved in the process of liberation in and through art. This study is a critical reflection upon the question of the beauty of Jesus Christ, especially in relationship with the event of the cross, and upon its meaning for Christian life. This book analyzes such topics in conversation with important theologians: Gustavo GutiĆ©rrez, Jon Sobrino, Karl Rahner, Hans Urs von Balthasar, Edward Schillebeeckx, and other contemporary Christian theologians who have explored these themes.


Divine Perfection and Human Potentiality: The Trinitarian Anthropology of Hilary of Poitiers (Oxford Studies in Historical Theology) 

Jarred Mercer

Oxford UP

The place of Hilary of Poitiers in the debates and developments of early Christianity is tenuous in contemporary scholarship. His invaluable historical position is unquestioned, but the coherence and significance of his own thought is less certain. In this book, Jarred A. Mercer makes a case for understanding Hilary not only as an important historical figure, but as a noteworthy and independent thinker.

Divine Perfection and Human Potentiality offers a new paradigm for understanding Hilary’s work De Trinitate. The book contends that in all of Hilary’s polemical and constructive argumentation, which is essentially trinitarian, he is inherently developing an anthropology. The work therefore reinterprets Hilary’s overall theological project in terms of the continual, and for him necessary, anthropological corollary of trinitarian theology- to reframe it in terms of a “trinitarian anthropology.” The coherence of Hilary’s work depends upon this framework, and without it his thought continues to elude his readers. Mercer demonstrates this through following Hilary’s main lines of trinitarian argument, out of which flow his anthropological vision. These trinitarian arguments unfold into a progressive picture of humanity from potentiality to perfection.

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