Ten Theology Books to Watch For – Feb. 2019

February 15, 2019

 

Here are some excellent theology* books that will be released this month:

* broadly interpreted, including ethics, church history, biblical studies, and other areas that intersect with theology

See a book here that you’d like to review for us?
Contact us, and we’ll talk about the possibility of a review.

   [easyazon_image align=”center” height=”500″ identifier=”0190618930″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/41T2fVyKz3L.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”353″]

[easyazon_link identifier=”0190618930″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]This Is Our Message: Women’s Leadership in the New Christian Right[/easyazon_link] 

Emily Johnson

Oxford UP

Over the past 50 years, the architects of the religious right have become household names: Jerry Falwell, Pat Robertson, James Dobson. They have used their massively influential platforms to build the profiles of evangelical politicians like Mike Huckabee, Rick Perry, and Ted Cruz. Now, a new generation of leaders like Jerry Falwell Jr. and Robert Jeffress enjoys unprecedented access to the Trump White House.

What all these leaders share, besides their faith, is their gender. Men dominate the standard narrative of the rise of the religious right. Yet during the 1970s and 1980s nationally prominent evangelical women played essential roles in shaping the priorities of the movement and mobilizing its supporters. In particular, they helped to formulate, articulate, and defend the traditionalist politics of gender and family that in turn made it easy to downplay the importance of their leadership roles. In This Is Our Message, Emily Johnson begins by examining the lives and work of four well-known women-evangelical marriage advice author Marabel Morgan, singer and anti-gay-rights activist Anita Bryant, author and political lobbyist Beverly LaHaye, and televangelist Tammy Faye Bakker. The book explores their impact on the rise of the New Christian Right and on the development of the evangelical subculture, which is a key channel for injecting conservative political ideas into purportedly apolitical spaces. Johnson then highlights the ongoing significance of this history through an analysis of Sarah Palin’s vice presidential candidacy in 2008 and Michele Bachmann’s presidential bid in 2012. These campaigns were made possible by the legacies of an earlier generation of conservative evangelical women who continue to impact our national conversations about gender, family, and sex.






[easyazon_image align=”center” height=”500″ identifier=”B07F39CKF1″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/412BYNH9hzvL-1.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”324″]

[easyazon_link identifier=”B07F39CKF1″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Restless Faith: Holding Evangelical Beliefs in a World of Contested Labels[/easyazon_link]  

Richard Mouw

Brazos Press

One of the most influential evangelical voices in America chronicles what it has meant for him to spend the past half century as a “restless evangelical”–a way of maintaining his identity in an age when many claim the label “evangelical” has become so politicized that it is no longer viable. Richard Mouw candidly reflects on wrestling with traditional evangelical beliefs over the years and shows that although his mind has changed in some ways, his core beliefs have not. He contends that we should hold on to the legacy that has enriched evangelicalism in the past. The Christian life in its healthiest form, says Mouw, is always a matter of holding on to essentials while constantly moving on along paths that we can walk in faithfulness only by seeking the continuing guidance of the light of God’s Word. As Mouw affirms the essentials of the evangelical faith, he helps a new generation see the wisdom embodied in them.

<<<<< PREV. PAGE | NEXT PAGE >>>>>
PAGE 3 of 5