Archives For Writers

 

(Editor’s Note: We’ve had a lull in this series over the summer, but am glad to revive it now!)

In 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

 

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by Brad Fruhauff.

Writers on the Classics:
[#1 – Shane Claiborne ] [#12 (Previous Post) – Tania Runyan ]

 

Brad FruhauffBrad Fruhauff is editor-in-chief of Relief: A Christian Literary Expression and teaches English at Trinity International University. His poems, stories, and reviews have appeared in Rock & Sling, Relief, ERB, catapult, Burnside Writers Collective, and The Ankeny Briefcase.

I tell my students that all writing has parameters and that they can use those parameters to learn discipline in their writing, so I tried hard, here, to abide by Chris Smith’s preference for titles in the public domain. There was also no attempt to define a “classic” other than as an older book to which I return often, so I felt free to interpret that broadly, though in the end the list may look pretty conventional. This, I think, is in the spirit of the question, which is about the persistence of books over time. But these really are books that I think of fondly or that marked significant moments in my personal, spiritual, and intellectual development. They are “classic” to me because I seem to be always talking about what is between their covers.

 


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Brent BillIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

 

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by J. Brent Bill.

Writers on the Classics:
[#1 – Shane Claiborne ] [#12 (Previous Post) – Hannah Notess ]

 

J. Brent Bill is a writer, photographer, retreat leader, and Quaker minister, who has written and co-written many books including: Awaken Your Senses: Exercises for Exploring the Wonder of God and Sacred Compass: The Way of Spiritual Discernment.  Brent lives on Ploughshares Farm, which is fifty acres of Indiana farmland that is being reclaimed for native hardwood forests and warm season prairie grasses.  He blogs at Holy Ordinary.

 


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20130122_SPU_Response-Winter-2013_Hannah-Notess_Portrait_001In 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

 

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by Hannah Faith Notess.

Writers on the Classics:
[#1 – Shane Claiborne ] [#12 (Previous Post) – Rachel Marie Stone ]

 

Hannah Faith Notess is managing editor of Seattle Pacific University’s Response magazine and editor of Jesus Girls: True Tales of Growing Up Female and Evangelical, a collection of personal essays. Her poems have appeared in The Christian Century, Slate, Rattle, and The Mennonite, among other publications. For more of her idiosyncratic book opinions, check out 30bookstoreadbefore30.wordpress.com. She lives in Seattle. (Photo credit: Luke Rutan).

 


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Rachel Marie StoneIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

 

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by Rachel Marie Stone.

Writers on the Classics:
[ #1 – Shane Claiborne ] [ #5 (Last Week) – Jen Pollock Michel ]

 

Rachel Marie Stone is the author of Eat With Joy: Redeeming God’s Gift of Food, just out from InterVarsity Press. She’s also the author of a book about Jesus for children with the working title God’s Upside-Down Kingdom, forthcoming from Olive Branch Books this year. Her writing appears in places like Christianity TodaySojourners, Books & Culture, The Huffington Post, The Christian Century, RELEVANTCatapult, The Suffolk Times, PRISM, The Progressive Christian, Creation Care Magazine, and Flourish Magazine. She’s a regular contributor to Christianity Today’s popular women’s blog, Her.meneutics, and tweets @rachel_m_stone.

 


 

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Jen Pollock MichelIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by Jen Pollock Michel.

Writers on the Classics:
[ #1 – Shane Claiborne ] [ #5 (Last Week) – Amy Frykholm ]

Jen Pollock Michel is a writer, speaker, and mother of five. She is a member of Redbud Writers Guild and writes regularly for Christianity Today’s Her.Menuetics. Currently, she is working on a book manuscript called Found Wanting: At the Intersection of Faith and Desire. Jen earned her B.A. in French from Wheaton College and her M.A. in Literature from Northwestern University. She lives in Toronto, Canada, with her family and blogs at www.findingmypulse.com. You can follow Jen on twitter @jenpmichel.


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Amy FrykholmIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

 

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

 

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by Amy Frykholm.

Writers on the Classics:
[ #1 – Shane Claiborne ] [ #5 (Last Week) – Doug Worgul ]

Amy Fykholm is Associate editor of The Christian Century, and regularly writes for a number of publications on religion, culture and spirituality. She is the author of three books in the field of religion and culture, ranging in subject matter from the end times to medieval mysticism to contemporary sexuality, but held together by their curiosity about the stories humans tell about God.  Read our review of her recent book Julian of Norwich: A Contemplative Biography.

 


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Doug WorgulIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

 

This week’s post in the series is by novelist Doug Worgul.

Writers on the Classics:
[ #1 – Shane Claiborne ] [ #5 (Last Week) – John Wilson ]

Doug Worgul is the author of the Englewood Review’s 2012 Novel of the Year, Thin Blue Smoke. He was born into a family of preachers, teachers, and writers, in the state of Michigan. He now resides in Kansas City where barbecue and the blues are a way of life. A strong sense of place is a major theme in Doug Worgul’s fiction, as it has been in his career as a newspaper journalist and editor of regional and national magazines. He is a nationally-recognized authority on the history and cultural significance of American barbecue traditions. He is married and has four daughters.

 


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John WilsonIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by John Wilson.

Writers on the Classics:
[ #1 – Shane Claiborne ] [ #7 (Last Week) –  Carol Howard Merritt ]

John Wilson is editor of Books & Culture and editor at large for Christianity Today magazine. He received a B.A. from Westmont College in Santa Barbara, Calif., in 1970 and an M.A. from California State University, Los Angeles, in 1975. His reviews and essays appear in the New York Times, the Boston Globe, First Things, National Review, and other publications. He and his wife, Wendy, are members of Faith Evangelical Covenant Church in Wheaton; they have four children.


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In 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

 

This week’s post in the series is by Carol Howard Merritt.

Writers on the Classics:
[ #1 – Shane Claiborne ] [ #6 (Last Week) – Chris Smith ]

 

Carol Howard Merritt is a conference speaker, the author of Reframing Hope: Vital Ministry in a New Generation and Tribal Church: Ministering to the Missing Generation and the cohost of God Complex Radio. She has been a pastor for 13 years, serving growing Presbyterian Churches in the swamps of Cajun Louisiana, a bayside village in Rhode Island, and in an urban neighborhood in D.C. She also served as a pastor at Western Presbyterian Church, an intergenerational congregation in Washington, D.C.  Her blog Tribal Church is hosted by the Christian Century.


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Chris SmithIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by ERB Editor, Chris Smith.

Writers on the Classics:
[ #1 – Shane Claiborne ] [ #5 (Last Week) – Ragan Sutterfield ]

Chris Smith is the author of five books, including The Virtue of Dialogue: Conversation as a Hopeful Practice of Church Communities (Patheos Press 2012) . He is currently finalizing the manuscript for a book entitled Slow Church, co-written with John Pattison (forthcoming IVP Books, Late 2013).  John and Chris blog about this new book project on Patheos.


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