Archives For William Cavanaugh

 

Enacting New and more Humane Types of Social, Political & Economic Practices

A Feature Review of

Field Hospital: The Church’s Engagement with a Wounded World
William Cavanuagh

Paperback: Eerdmans, 2016.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  

Reviewed by James Honig

 

Timing is everything. For the church of Christ trying to be faithful to their call to be salt and light in the middle of a particularly rancorous and strange presidential campaign, comes a new volume from William Cavanaugh, a theologian whose new work I always eagerly look forward to and who has been consistently helpful in my own understanding of how the church engages with the world. The title for his new volume comes from an image Pope Francis has used for the church, that the church needs to go near to the wounds of the world and engage the wounded with the Gospel of Jesus Christ. In this volume, Cavanaugh further explicates how he thinks that might happen.

The book is a collection of essays, nearly all of them previously published in a variety of academic journals.  While Cavanaugh (or an astute editor) attempts to fashion the various essays into a reasonable narrative arc, they remain, in my judgment, a collection of relatively independent though related essays.

Continue Reading…

 

One of this week’s best new book releases is… 

Field Hospital:
The Church’s Engagement with a Wounded World
William Cavanaugh

Paperback: Eerdmans, 2016.
Buy now: [ Amazon
 

This video conversation with the author is a great introduction to the book:

 
Continue Reading…

 

Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

 

Field Hospital: The Church’s Engagement with a Wounded World

By William Cavanaugh

Read an excerpt from this book

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

Continue Reading…

 

William Cavanaugh - BEING CONSUMEDHere’s a superb theological reflection for Black Friday…

An 11-minute video introduction to:

Being Consumed: Economics and Christian Desire.

William Cavanaugh

Paperback. Eerdmans, 2008.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

A 2008 Englewood Honor Book
[ Read our review… ]


Part I:



Continue Reading…

 

This list originally appeared in our Eastertide / Summer print issue,
but we thought we’d reprint it here for readers who haven’t seen that issue…

It was a difficult choice, but here are our picks for the best books of the first half of 2011:

[ In order by author’s last name… ]

Caleb’s Crossing
Geraldine Brooks

Hardback: Viking Books
Read an excerpt.  Review coming in next print issue.

The Origin of Species and Other Poems.
Ernesto Cardenal.

Hardback: Texas Tech Univ. Press
Review by Brent Aldrich upcoming in the next print issue.


Migrations of the Holy: God, State and the
Political Meaning of the Church

Bill Cavanaugh

Paperback: Eerdmans
Read our Review by Micah Weedman


Marshall McLuhan:
You Know Nothing of My Work!

Douglas Coupland

Hardback: Atlas Books
Review by Read Mercer Schuhardt in theLent print issue.


The End of Evangelicalism?
David Fitch

Paperback: Cascade Books
Read our Review by Chris Smith


Year of Plenty
Craig Goodwin

Paperback: Sparkhouse
Read our Review by Brent Aldrich


The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction
Alan Jacobs

Hardback: Oxford Univ. Press
Review by Chris Smith in the Eastertide print issue.


The Sacrifice of Africa:
A Political Theology for Africa

Emmanuel Katongole
.

Paperback: Eerdmans
Read our review by Chris Smith


Julian of Norwich, Theologian.
Denys Turner
.
Hardback: Yale Univ. Press.
Review by Alex Joyner
in the Eastertide print issue.


All That We Share
Jay Walljasper
Paperback: The New Press
Read our Review


The Environmental Vision of Thomas Merton
Monica Weis
Hardback: University Press of Kentucky.
Read Chris Smith’s Review in THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY.

Our review by Brent Aldrich coming soon.


Food and Faith: A Theology of Eating
Norman Wirzba

Hardback: Cambridge Univ. Press
Interview with Norman in Eastertide print issue.
Review will run online soon…

Caleb’s Crossing

Geraldine Brooks

Hardback: Viking Books

Watch for our upcoming review online.

The Origin of Species and Other Poems

Ernesto Cardenal

Hardback: Texas Tech Univ. Press

Review by Brent Aldrich upcoming online.

Migrations of the Holy: God, State and the

Political Meaning of the Church

Bill Cavanaugh

Paperback: Eerdmans

Review by Micah Weedman

online at bit.ly/ERB-Cavanaugh

Marshall McLuhan: You Know Nothing of My Work!

Douglas Coupland

Hardback: Atlas Books

Review by Read Mercer Schuhardt in the

Lent print issue of the ERB

The End of Evangelicalism?

David Fitch

Paperback: Cascade Books

Review by Chris Smith

online at bit.ly/ERB-Fitch

Year of Plenty

Craig Goodwin

Paperback: Sparkhouse

Review by Brent Aldrich

online at bit.ly/ERB-Goodwin

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction

Alan Jacobs

Hardback: Oxford Univ. Press

Review by Chris Smith on page 10.

The Sacrifice of Africa: A Political Theology for Africa

Emmanuel Katongole

Paperback: Eerdmans

Review by Chris Smith

online at bit.ly/ERB-Katongole

Julian of Norwich, Theologian

Denys Turner

Hardback: Yale Univ. Press

Review by Alex Joyner on page 26.

All That We Share

Jay Walljapser

Paperback: The New Press

Review by Chris Smith

online at bit.ly/ERB-Commons

The Environmental Vision of Thomas Merton

Monica Weis

Hardback: University Press of Kentucky

Watch for our upcoming review online.

Food and Faith: A Theology of Eating

Norman Wirzba

Hardback: Cambridge Univ. Press

Conversation with Norman Wirzba on page 4.

   

   

   

 

“Practices that Resist the Colonization
of the Christian Imagination

A review of

Migrations of the Holy:
God, State and the Political Meaning of the Church.

By William Cavanaugh.

Review by Micah Weedman.

[ Read an Excerpt of this book here… ]

Migrations of the Holy - William CavanaughMigrations of the Holy:
God, State and the Political Meaning of the Church.

William Cavanaugh.
Paperback: Eerdmans, 2011.
Buy now: [ ChristianBook.com ]

When I was in seminary, I made it a point to carry with me my copy of William Cavanaugh’s Torture and Eucharist whenever  I could.  I can’t say for sure, of course, what my classmates made of this, if anything.  But I liked to think it gave me a certain seriousness.  The cover of the book alone—that stark, black border with the even starker picture in the middle and the simple but distressing title—seem to signal that the study of theology, or church, or even ministry wasn’t safe anymore.  Cavanaugh’s work, of course, merits serious devotion, though toting his books around isn’t necessary.  That it merits such devotion on the part of so many readers has to do with, I suspect, the reality that the truth of what he says renders so many of our inherited convictions about church, state and politics not just wrong, or upended, but unsafe.

In Cavanaugh’s newest book, Migrations of the Holy: God, State and the Political Meaning of the Church,  the author continues his previous work of exploring—and in most cases, exploding—the myths that we tend to associate with the role of the state, the mission of the church, and how these things relate to our understanding of God.  While it lacks the raw depth of Torture and Eucharist, the powerful coherence of Theopolitical Imagination or the accessibility of Being Consumed, the book presents a collection of previously-published essays that, when grouped together, take Cavanaugh’s work further than it’s gone before.

Continue Reading…

 

An excerpt from

Migrations of the Holy:
God, State and the Political Meaning of the Church
.
William Cavanaugh.
Paperback: Eerdmans, 2011.
Buy now: [ ChristianBook.com ]

Read our review of this book

 

The Season of Lent is a time on the Church’s Calendar when we through prayer and fasting reflect upon our desires and submit ourselves to the transforming power of God.

Here are six recent books — one for each week of Lent — that reflect the Lenten spirit or that challenge us to take a deeper look at the seasons of the Christian year.


Fasting
(Ancient Practices Series)

by Scot McKnight.
Thomas Nelson, 2009.
[ Our Review ] [ Buy the Book ]

——

Seasons of Celebration:
Meditations on the Cycle of Liturgical Feasts
.
By Thomas Merton.
Ave Maria Press, 2009.
[ Our Review ] [ Buy the Book ]


Being Consumed:
Economics and Christian Desire

by Bill Cavanuagh.
Eerdmans, 2008.
[ Our Review ] [ Buy the Book ]

—–

The Liturgical Year
(Ancient Practices Series)

By Joan Chittister
Thomas Nelson, 2009.
[ Our Review ] [ Buy the Book ]


Enough: Contentment in An Age of Excess.
By Will Samson.
David C. Cook, 2009.

[ Our Review ] [ Buy the Book ]
—–
Living the Christian Year:
Time to Inhabit the Story of God
.
By Bobby Gross.
IVP Books, 2007.
[ Our Review ] [ Buy the Book ]

 

Presented here are our recordings of Bill Cavanaugh’s talks from the Ekklesia Project Gathering at DePaul University on 10 July 2009.  This talk was related to his recent book Being Consumed (Click here for our review), but more specifically focused on the present economic crisis, which hit hardest after the book was released.  Cavanaugh does a superb job at getting to the heart of why the American economy crashed and lays out much to think about as the Body of Christ discerns what economic faithfulness looks like.

[display_podcast]


Creative Commons License
Talk copyright 2009, William Cavanaugh.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

“Rooted in Economic Discernment?”

A Review of
Being Consumed:
Economics and Christian Desire.

by William Cavanaugh.

 

By Chris Smith.

Being Consumed:
Economics and Christian Desire.

William Cavanaugh.

Paperback. Eerdmans, 2008.
Buy now from: [ ChristianBook.com ]


When William Cavanaugh’s little book Being Consumed: Economics and Christian Desire was published earlier this year, no one could have guessed how relevant it would become with the recent economic turmoil.  This little book of four essays is a tool for helping us reflect in our churches on why we got into this economic mess.  The book’s essays are structured around the contrast between pairs of key ideas related to contemporary capitalist economics: “Freedom and Unfreedom,” “Detachment and Attachment,” “The Global and the Local” and “Scarcity and Abundance.” 

                In the first essay “Freedom and Unfreedom,” Cavanaugh uses Augustine’s concept of freedom as the basis for a Christian critique of the modern capitalist notion of “free markets.”  The thrust of his critique lies in the distinction that the capitalist concept of freedom is a “freedom from” that has no clear end, whereas Augustine views freedom as a “freedom for” which has a specific end in mind (i.e., reconciliation with God).  Cavanaugh also emphasizes that in contrast to the stark individualistic autonomy of capitalism, the Augustinian view of freedom maintains that others are “crucial to one’s freedom” (9).  Our desires, he observes, do not merely bubble up from within us, but rather our desires are formed in a social crucible, being shaped both from within and without (i.e., from our relationships with others).  Finally, Cavanaugh highlights Augustine’s notion that everything that exists is good, but only to the extent that they participate in the telos of creation – reconciliation with God.  Thus, when we desire things for their own sake, they become nothing to us.  Cavanaugh sagely observes that this provides a striking explanation for the addictiveness of consumer behavior:

A person buys something – anything – trying to fill the hole that is the empty shrine. And once the shopper purchases the thing, it turns into a nothing, and she has to head back to the mall to continue the search.  With no objective ends to guide the search, her search is literally endless(15).

Continue Reading…