Archives For Willa Cather

 

TODAY (Dec. 7) is the birthday of Willa Cather, one of the greatest fiction writers of the twentieth century!

In honor of her life and work, we offer five of her short stories that can be read in full…

The Sculptor’s Funeral
Willa Cather
(1905)

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The Wake Up CallThe Wake Up Call –
7 December 2012

Like the smell of strong coffee wafting down the hall, we offer a few book-related thoughts and stories to jumpstart your day…

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Today is the Feast of Saint Ambrose (c.330-397)!
Read Alban Butler’s classic account of Ambrose’s life from LIVES OF THE SAINTS…
DOWNLOAD a free ebook version of LIVES OF THE SAINTS!

“What was any art but a mould in which to imprison for a moment the shining elusive element which is life itself – life hurrying past us and running away, too strong to stop, too sweet to lose.”  – Novelist Willa Cather, born on this day in 1873.

*** Books by Willa Cather

Book News:

Thanks be to God for this new day, may it be full of beauty and grace!

The Wake Up Call image via WikiMedia Commons

 

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Portraits of the Prairie

A Review of


Portraits of the Prairie:
The Land that Inspired Willa Cather
.
Richard Schilling.
Hardback: University of Nebraska Press, 2011.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]

Reviewed by Ruth Huizenga Everhart.

See an excerpt of this book here… (PDF)

Willa Cather famously said: “There are only two or three human stories, and they go on repeating themselves as fiercely as if they had never happened before.” It’s this ability to step back and see an ordinary thing with different eyes that is captured so beautifully in this unusual coffee table book. The author, Richard Schilling, has paired quotations from Willa Cather with his own original art, primarily done in watercolor, all of it focused on the Nebraska prairie.

Willa Cather, who is known for her fiction writing, spent a single year on the prairie when she was nine. At the time she disliked the rolling flat lands, but later realized how tussling with the land had shaped her. Cather’s relationship to the land is not sentimental. Rather, the solitude and rawness of the prairie sandpapered her prose to its pristine qualities.

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