Archives For Virtues

 

Birds, Bricklayers, and Baseball
 
A Feature Review of

The Character of Virtue:
Letters to a Godson
Stanley Hauerwas

Hardback: Eerdmans, 2018.
Buy Now:
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Reviewed by Sam Edgin

 

As the Boy’s head dipped down into the water I thought about joy. The Boy, my friend’s son, wide-eyed in the midst of sacrament, upside down in baptism, stared at the ceiling with that wild wonder all children have in new experiences. His head came up, rivulets running onto his small, strong shoulders. He did not cry. The sign of the cross was marked on his forehead, invisible and eternal. The sacrament, holy and piercing through time, was put in words. It was our turn. My wife and I, up before the expectant faces of the congregation, were asked if we would do our part, to support and encourage the the Boy in the life of faith. We said yes. It was why we were there, honored and nervous and brimming with love.

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Stanley Hauerwas

Today is the birthday of theologian Stanley Hauerwas!

Although I don’t always agree with him, Stanley Hauerwas’s work (and that of his many students, e.g., Phil Kenneson and others associated with The Ekklesia Project) has been absolutely vital to the Slow Church book that John Pattison and I co-wrote.

In honor of his birthday, I pick out 10 brief video clips of Hauerwas talking about key virtues and practices related to Slow Church. If you want to read one book by Stanley Hauerwas that is most compatible with Slow Church, I suggest Living Gently in a Violent World (co-written with Jean Vanier).

Several of these clips were made by Travis Reed of The Work of the People. Be sure to visit his website, check out other extraordinary videos he has created and contribute generously to his work!
*** Check out the full catalog of TWOTP’s Stanley Hauerwas videos
 

Enjoy these short videos with Stanley Hauerwas:

Prayer/Waiting | Presence | Church Growth Movement
Patience | Formation in the Church  | The Whole Church  | 
Joy
Hope is Presence | Engaging Evangelicals  | Community and Conflict

Prayer and Waiting:

“If prayer has taught me anything, it has taught me how to wait.”

 




 

NEXT (Presence) >>>>>>

Image Credit: From the cover to Hauerwas’s memoir Hannah’s Child… (Buy it now!)

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Patience
by Gerard Manley Hopkins

PATIENCE, hard thing! the hard thing but to pray,
But bid for, Patience is! Patience who asks
Wants war, wants wounds; weary his times, his tasks;
To do without, take tosses, and obey.
Rare patience roots in these, and, these away,
Nowhere. Natural heart’s ivy, Patience masks
Our ruins of wrecked past purpose. There she basks
Purple eyes and seas of liquid leaves all day.

We hear our hearts grate on themselves: it kills
To bruise them dearer. Yet the rebellious wills
Of us we do bid God bend to him even so.
And where is he who more and more distils
Delicious kindness?–He is patient. Patience fills
His crisp combs, and that comes those ways we know.

 

A Brief Review of

The Virtues
Pope Benedict XVI
Hardback: Our Sunday Visitor, 2010
Buy now: [ Amazon ]

Reviewed by Shaun C. Brown.

The Virtues is a collection of short pieces by Pope Benedict XVI, and edited by Jacquelyn Lindsey.  After an introduction written by the editor, the volume consists of excerpts from writings, speeches, homilies, and prayers of the current pope on the theological virtues (faith, hope, and charity) and the cardinal virtues (prudence, justice, fortitude, and temperance), as well as some definitions of virtue and the virtues from the Catechism of the Catholic Church and Scripture.  Lindsey edits an introduction to both the theological and the cardinal virtues, and devotes a chapter to each of the seven virtues.

Lindsey edited the volume because, “The world would do well to focus more intently on the Theological and Cardinal Virtues” (9).  The Catechism of the Catholic Church says, “A virtue is an habitual and firm disposition to do the good.  It allows the person not only to perform good acts, but to give the best of himself.  The virtuous person tends toward the good with all his senses and spiritual powers; he pursues the good and chooses it in concrete actions” (CCC 1803).  Lindsey edited a volume on virtue using the work of Pope Benedict XVI because “he has regularly woven the them of the virtues throughout his writings and speeches” (9).  This is illustrated by the fact that his first three encyclicals, Deus Caritas est (“God is Charity/Love”), Spe Salvi (“Saved in Hope”), and Caritas in Veritate (“Charity/Love in Truth”), have dealt with the virtues.

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