Archives For Twitter

 

Social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter are taking a fair bit of criticism these days, and much of it is warranted. But one of the more worthwhile uses I’ve found for Twitter is to follow theologians on Twitter and to engage in conversation with them.

Theology is a conversation, and these days the conversation isn’t just limited to books or the halls of the academy. Today, anyone with a Twitter account can engage online with some of the finest theologians of our day.

Here are some of our favorite theologians * to follow on Twitter:

They represent a broad range of perspectives, and you likely won’t agree with any of them all the time, but they all are worth listening to. (We’ve limited this list to living theologians who primarily tweet in English — Sorry, @LeonardoBoff — and who are relatively active on Twitter — Sorry, @ProfRah.)
 
* We use the label “theologians” broadly here. All of the scholars featured below do theology in the broad sense of helping us understand God, the scriptural stories about God, and how we best live into the way of God. Not of them are theologians in the narrow academic sense, some are biblical scholars, some are ethicists, etc.
 


 

In alphabetical order of their Twitter handle:

(Or we’ve created a list where you
can follow along with the conversation.)

 
Christena Cleveland
@CSCleve
Director of the Center for Justice + Renewal, professor @dukedivinity, social psychologist, public theologian, serving resistance


 
Daniel P. Horan, OFM
@DanHoranOFM
Franciscan Friar | Catholic priest | Theologian | Runner |
@ChicagoCTU Professor | @NCRonline columnist | @FrancisFXpod co-host


 
Dr. Chanequa Walker-Barnes
@drchanequa
Author of Too Heavy a Yoke: Black Women and the Burden of Strength | She/Her


 
Eboni Marshall Turman
@ebonithoughts
Asst Professor @Yale l Author of Toward a Womanist Ethic l
Baptist preacher l Arts maniac l #1 Auntie I
Black philanthropy I Black excellence.


 
David Fitch
@fitchest
Husband/dad, C&MA pastor, author,
Anabaptist holiness evangelical missional theologian,
church planter, professor at @nseminary, work for @FExpressionsUS .


 
Continue Reading…

 

A Brief Review of

Thy Kingdom Connected:
What the Church Can Learn From Facebook,
The Internet and Other Networks.

Dwight Friesen.
Paperback: Baker, 2009.
Buy now: [ ChristianBook.com ]

Reviewed by Chris Smith.

For the last several years, social networks have been all the rage.  The number of users on networks like Facebook and Twitter rises exponentially each year, and newer, more specific social networks emerge every day.  It comes as little surprise then, that someone would eventually explore the topic of what the church can learn from these social networks, as Dwight Friesen has done in his new book Thy Kingdom Connected.  Given the trendiness of social networking, however, what does come as a delightful surprise is the depth and acumen with which Friesen addresses this topic; despite the overwhelming relevance of social networks, this is not an opportunistic book.  No, indeed Thy Kingdom Connected is a rich exploration of post-modern ecclesiology that happens to illustrate key points with examples from contemporary science, network theory and familiar social networks.  The key theme for Friesen here is demonstrating the inter-connectedness of God and creation, and there is plenty that we can learn from network theory as a metaphor for our inter-connectedness with God, each other and all creation.

The highlight of the book, for me, was the section on leadership, and this came as a surprise because I typically think the deluge of writings on leadership in recent years is overrated.  It was refreshing to hear of Friesen’s own struggles with the terminology of “leadership,” followed by his depiction of a non-hierarchical, connected vision of leadership.  He says:

Leading connectively busts the myth of control and proactively dethrones hierarchies, daringly linking people and organizations with God’s vision of the connective kingdom and surrendering their personal vision for ministry.  In more hierarchical models of organizations, knowledge and connections were seen as power and the person with the most was in control.  Knowledge and connections were therefore often held tightly by the leader.  But leading connectively invites a redefinition of power. Power is very important in living networks, but it is not hoarded; it flows as a relational lubricant (100).

Thy Kingdom Connected is a superb reflection on the interconnectedness of creation and our call as followers of Christ to a mission of connection.  I look forward to re-reading and continuing to reflect on its wisdom!

 

Earlier this summer, we had the opportunity to sit down with Will Samson and chat over Twitter about his newest book, Enough: Contentment in an Age of Excess (Click here for our review).  We have cleaned up the text of the interview and are posting it here.

Enough: Contentment in an Age of Excess.
Will Samson.

Paperback: David C. Cook, 2009.
Buy now: [ ChristianBook.com ]

The Englewood Review of Books (ERB):  Welcome to The Englewood Review’s Summer #Twinterview No. 3 ! Our guest today is Will Samson.  Will is the author of the new book ENOUGH: CONTENTMENT IN AN AGE OF EXCESS (David C Cook 2009) … Welcome, Will!

Will Samson (WS):  Thanks for having me, Chris!

ERB:ENOUGH opens with your own story. What have been a few key points on your journey from living the American dream to wrestling with consumerism?

WS: The first major point along the way was reading Lesslie Newbiggin and thinking about the witness of the Church.  I came to believe that if all people knew of Jesus was the Church as I knew it, that we were all in trouble.  It looked nothing like Jesus.

ERB: Why is our theology (especially our views of the endtimes) so important to how we think and live in a consumer culture?

Continue Reading…

 


On June 16, Bloomsday (a holiday in remembrance of James Joyce and his novel Ulysses), we sat down with David Dark to talk via Twitter about his new book: The Sacredness of Questioning Everything.  Here is our conversation:

  1. I can’t think of a better way to celebrate #Bloomsday than to sit down with @DavidDark and talk about his new book. 1:00 PM Jun 16th from web
  2. THE SACREDNESS OF QUESTIONING EVERYTHING is not only a plea for critical engagement, > 1:01 PM Jun 16th from web
  3. it also is a gloriously dizzying tour through literature and pop music! 1:20 PM Jun 16th from web
  4. @daviddark Welcome! Thanks for sitting down with us! 1:02 PM Jun 16th from web
  5. @ERBks glad to be “here” 1:02 PM Jun 16th from web
  6. @daviddark LOL! Your book is very countercultural > 1:03 PM Jun 16th from web
  7. @daviddark Why should people read it, especially ones who tremble at the thought of questioning everything? 1:03 PM Jun 16th from web
  8. @ERBks Well, potential reader, if you think asking questions is at the heart of developing (and keeping) your soul, this book’s for you> 1:04 PM Jun 16th from web
  9. @ERBks and if U think the opposite’s true (keeping your soul saved requires somehow silencing your mind) I’d say this book’s REALLY for you! 1:05 PM Jun 16th from web
    Continue Reading…

 

  1. While you wait for the Intrvw w/ @ScotMcKnight Our revws of his 2 most recent bks BLUE PARAKEET http://tr.im/o1er /FASTING http://tr.im/o1fa12:00 PM Jun 10th from web
  2. Welcome to the Englewood Review twinterview with Scot McKnight ( @ScotMcKnight ), professor, blogger, and author of many books…12:00 PM Jun 10th from web
  3. We are talking today with Scot about his newest book FASTING ( @ThomasNelson 2009 ) Welcome Scot!12:01 PM Jun 10th from web
  4. @scotmcknight I know from experience that fasting is difficult for most people. So, why should we even pick up your book?12:01 PM Jun 10th from web
  5. @ERBks I’m hoping this book will shed some light on the abuses of fasting and the misunderstandings that have slipped in.12:03 PM Jun 10th from web in reply to ERBks
  6. Fasting, I believe, is natural and inevitable. When it becomes a chore or difficult something’s gone wrong.12:04 PM Jun 10th from web    Continue Reading…

 

Monday, June 22 beginning at 2PM ET, The Englewood Review of Books will engage Will Samson in a Twitter conversation about his recent book ENOUGH: CONTENTMENT IN AN AGE OF EXCESS (David C. Cook, 2009).In order to follow this twinterview live, you will need follow both:

@ERBks and @WASamson

I will kick off the twinterview at 2 PM ET on June 22, and having a set number of questions, the interview will continue until all the questions are answered.

If you don’t use twitter, the interview will eventually be published on the ERB website.

Help us spread the word:

  • Tweet about it, encouraging people to follow both @ERBks and @WASamson
  • Announce it on your blog or Facebook profile…

You won’t want to miss this special event!!!

AND WATCH FOR MORE TWINTERVIEWS THIS SUMMER ON @ERBKS !!!

 


Tomorrow, June 10 beginning at 12PM ET, The Englewood Review of Books will engage Scot McKnight in a Twitter conversation about his recent book FASTING, which is part of Thomas Nelson’s “Ancient Practices” series, edited by Phyllis Tickle.

In order to follow this twinterview live, you will need follow both:
@ERBks and @ScotMcKnight

I will kick off the twinterview at 12 PM ET on June 10, and having a set number of questions, the interview will continue until all the questions are answered.

If you don’t use twitter, the interview will eventually be published on the ERB website.

Help us spread the word:

You won’t want to miss this special event!!!

Other upcoming twinterviews:

Monday June 15: David Dark ( @DavidDark )
on his book, The Sacredness of Questioning Everything.
Monday June 22: Will Samson ( @WASamson )
on his book, Enough: Contentment in An Age of Excess

AND WATCH FOR MORE TWINTERVIEWS THIS SUMMER ON @ERBKS !!!

 

The Englewood Review will be giving away a book from Doulos Christou Press via Twitter.com every Thursday at 11AM (ET) this summer.

Here are the contest rules:

  1. You must follow us on Twitter @ERBks
  2. At 11AM (ET) each Thursday,  I’ll announce the start of the contest, with a question to which you must reply
  3. The third person to reply to our question will win that week’s book!
    (Note the change in rules this week, to make things more exciting!!!)

The book that we are giving away this week is Shane Claiborne’s Iraq Journal 2003, (pictured above) which tells the story in words and pictures of Shane’s time in Iraq right at the start of the present war.

 


On June 10, The Englewood Review of Books will engage Scot McKnight in a Twitter conversation about his recent book FASTING, which is part of Thomas Nelson’s “Ancient Practices” series, edited by Phyllis Tickle.

In order to follow this twinterview live, you will need follow both:
@ERBks and @ScotMcKnight

I will kick off the twinterview on the morning of June 10, and having a set number of questions, the interview will continue until all the questions are answered.

If you don’t use twitter, the interview will eventually be published on the ERB website.

Help us spread the word:

You won’t want to miss this special event!!!

AND WATCH FOR MORE TWINTERVIEWS THIS SUMMER ON @ERBKS !!!

 


Starting this week, we will be giving away a book from Doulos Christou Press via Twitter.com every Thursday at 11AM (ET) this summer.

Here are the contest rules:

  1. You must follow us on Twitter @ERBks
  2. At 11AM (ET) each Thursday,  I’ll announce the start of the contest, with a question to which you must reply
  3. The seventh person to reply to our question will win that week’s book!

The book that we are giving away this week is Liberty Hyde Bailey’s THE HOLY EARTH, which has a foreword by Ragan Sutterfield (see below).