Archives For T.S. Eliot

 

As the season of Lent is rapidly approaching, here are 7 of our favorite poems…

(Next Wednesday is Ash Wednesday)

Madeleine L’Engle, Gerard Manley Hopkins, T.S. Eliot, George Herbert and MORE….

If you enjoy these poems, I recommend
Nick Ripatrazone’s
Literary Reader for Lent

 

Lent: Ash Wednesday
George Herbert

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Star_of_Bethlehem

Today, January 6, is Epiphany, also known as Three Kings’ Day,

a Christian feast day that celebrates the revelation of God in his Son as human in Jesus Christ. In Western Christianity, the feast commemorates principally (but not solely) the visit of the Magi to the Christ child, and thus Jesus’ physical manifestation to the Gentiles. (via Wikipedia)

In honor of the occasion, here is T.S. Eliot reading his brief poem “The Journey of the Magi”

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Thomas_Stearns_Eliot

Today (January 4) marks the anniversary of the death of poet T.S. Eliot, who died on this day 1965.

In honor of the occasion, we present the T.S. Eliot Film Festival, four shorts based on his poems for you to watch in their entirety!

Also of interest:

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Thomas_Stearns_Eliot

 

Tomorrow (Sept. 26) marks the birthday of poet and critic T.S. Eliot.

In honor of the occasion, we offer four classic books of his that are available for FREE download in a variety of formats for almost any e-reader…

[ LISTEN to Eliot reading his poem The Waste Land ]

 

FREE Book #1:

The Waste Land

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We know too much, and are convinced of too little. Our literature is a substitute for religion, and so is our religion.
– T.S. Eliot, poet,

who was born on this date, 1888
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Poem of the Day:
T.S. Eliot Reading “The Wasteland”

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Kindle Ebook Deal of the Day: 
Prufrock and Other Observations
by T.S. Eliot

*** FREE!!!      [ Tweet this ]

*** NOTE: This stated price is for the United States. Unfortunately, this offer may or may not be available in other countries. Sorry!

 
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The Wake Up Call – September 26, 2014

“Let us not pray to be sheltered from dangers but to be fearless when facing them.”
– Rabindranath Tagore, Author,
who died on this date, 1941

 
Poem of the Day:
T.S. Eliot Reading “The Wasteland”

 
Kindle Ebook Deal of the Day: 
Getting Love Right
by Dallas Willard

Only $1.00!

 

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The Wake Up Call – August 7, 2014

 

T.S. EliotJanuary 4th marks the anniversary of the death of T.S. Eliot.

 
In remembrance of the poet, we offer this recording of him reading his poem The Waste Land.

The Waste Land is available as FREE Kindle ebook
or is available in bargain print editions like this one.
 
“The Waste Land” is a long poem written by T.S. Eliot. It is widely regarded as “one of the most important poems of the 20th century” and a central text in Modernist poetry. Published in 1922, the 434-line poem first appeared in the U.K. in the October issue of The Criterion and in the U.S. in the November issue of The Dial. It was published in book form in December 1922.

The poem’s structure is divided into five sections. The first section, titled The Burial of the Dead introduces the diverse themes of disillusionment and despair. The second, titled A Game of Chess employs vignettes of several characters—alternating narrations—that address those themes experientially. The Fire Sermon, the third section, offers a philosophical meditation in relation to the imagery of death and views of self-denial in juxtaposition influenced by Augustine of Hippo and eastern religions. After a fourth section that includes a brief lyrical petition, the culminating fifth section, What the Thunder Said concludes with an image of judgment. (Wikipedia)
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T.S. EliotThe Hippopotamus
T.S. Eliot

 

[Remembering Eliot
who died on this day in 1965]

*** Books by T.S. Eliot

 

 

 

Similiter et omnes revereantur Diaconos, ut mandatum Jesu Christi; et Episcopum, ut Jesum Christum, existentem filium Patris; Presbyteros autem, ut concilium Dei et conjunctionem Apostolorum. Sine his Ecclesia non vocatur; de quibus suadeo vos sic habeo.

S. IGNATII AD TRALLIANOS.

And when this epistle is read among you, cause
that it be read also in the church of the
Laodiceans.

 

The broad-backed hippopotamus
Rests on his belly in the mud;
Although he seems so firm to us
He is merely flesh and blood.

 

Flesh-and-blood is weak and frail,
Susceptible to nervous shock;
While the True Church can never fail
For it is based upon a rock.

 

The hippo’s feeble steps may err
In compassing material ends,
While the True Church need never stir
To gather in its dividends.

 

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Morning at the Window
T.S. Eliot

T.S. Eliot - Morning at the WindowThey are rattling breakfast plates in basement kitchens,
And along the trampled edges of the street
I am aware of the damp souls of housemaids
Sprouting despondently at area gates.

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“Mr. Eliot’s Sunday Morning Service”

T.S. Eliot

[ Found in Collected Poems 1909-1962 ]

Look, look, master, here comes two religious
caterpillars.

— The Jew of Malta.

Polyphiloprogenitive
The sapient sutlers of the Lord
Drift across the window-panes.
In the beginning was the Word.

In the beginning was the Word.
Superfetation of ?? ??,
And at the mensual turn of time
Produced enervate Origen.

A painter of the Umbrian school
Designed upon a gesso ground
The nimbus of the Baptized God.
The wilderness is cracked and browned

But through the water pale and thin
Still shine the unoffending feet
And there above the painter set
The Father and the Paraclete.
. . . . .
The sable presbyters approach
The avenue of penitence;
The young are red and pustular
Clutching piaculative pence.

Under the penitential gates
Sustained by staring Seraphim
Where the souls of the devout
Burn invisible and dim.

Along the garden-wall the bees
With hairy bellies pass between
The staminate and pistilate,
Blest office of the epicene.

Sweeney shifts from ham to ham
Stirring the water in his bath.
The masters of the subtle schools
Are controversial, polymath.