Archives For Theology

 

Here are a some excellent theology* books that will be released this month:

* broadly interpreted, including ethics, church history, biblical studies, and other areas that intersect with theology

  

Hope and Community: A Constructive Christian Theology for the Pluralistic World

Veli-Matti Karkkainen

Eerdmans
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A Model of Passionate
and Detailed Conversation
 
A Review of 

Old-Earth or Evolutionary Creation?
Kenneth Keathley, J. B. Stump, and Joe Aguirre, Eds.

Paperback: IVP Academic, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [  Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Justin Cober-Lake

 

Religious faith and scientific study haven’t always been at odds, but over the last few decades, few interdisciplinary conversations have been as publicly contentious. Between the rise of New Atheism and the speed of scientific discovery, the culture wars have persisted when it comes to issues like evolution/creation, the age of the earth, and more. These debates haven’t always been amicable, even within Christian circles, but two organizations committed to looking at these fields of study look for healthy ways to advance conversation. BioLogs and Reasons to Believe (RTB) have turned a decade’s worth of interaction into Old-Earth or Evolutionary Creation?, a work designed  to present not only views of the two groups, but also the charitable attitude that informs their ongoing discussions.

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The Chronic Ache of Injustice
 
A Review of 
 

Love in a Time of Climate Change:
Honoring Creation, Establishing Justice
Sharon Delgado

Paperback: Fortress Press, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Teresa Langness
 
 
Hurricane Harvey jolted Houstonites out of their homes and armchair television viewers out of their comfort zones, especially in light of rapid increase of “500-year hurricanes” devastating the region in the past five years. A month earlier, a newly released book had asked readers to hear not only the cries of their countrymen and women but the chronic ache of injustice among climate change victims around the world.

The title of Sharon Delgado’s new book shifts the topic of climate change out of its usual dimensions, which too often buck wildly from well-corralled layers of scientific research into the muddier bog of political rhetoric.

Through crisp storytelling, personal experience and articulate up-to-the-minute research, Love in the Time of Climate Change posits a theory that we must deeply understand but look beyond both. We must act not only with our minds but with our hearts and our feet to safeguard all members of our human family during the current age and stage of climate change.

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Our most anticipated book of this fall is ..

 

Awaiting the King: Reforming Public Theology (Cultural Liturgies, Book 3)
James K.A. Smith

Paperback: Baker Academic, 2017
Pre-Order Now:  [ Amazon ]
 
 

The publisher has just released a series of
five brief videos that give a nice taste of the book.

We highly recommend watching these videos when you get a chance!

 

Video #1 – Awaiting the King:

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Reframing our
Theology and Evangelism

 
A Review of

Salvation by Allegiance Alone: Rethinking Faith, Works, and the Gospel of Jesus the King.
Matthew Bates

Hardback: Baker Academic, 2017.
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]   [ Kindle ]

 
Reviewed by Danny Yencich
 
 
Matthew Bates’s recent Salvation by Allegiance Alone is a welcome book. It is useful—vital, even—for Christians of any traditional or denominational stripe grappling with the Gospel.

The book, which is clearly aimed at a mixed audience of laity and students, forwards a simple but important thesis: contemporary Christianity has, for the most part, gotten it wrong when it comes to “belief, faith, works, salvation, heaven, and the gospel” itself (2). Bates’s argument hinges on a fresh take on the first item in that list— “belief” (pistis). Whenever the Greek term pistis appears in the New Testament with reference to eternal salvation, Bates suggests that allegiance, not “belief,” “is the best macro-term available to us that can describe what God requires from us for eternal salvation” (5). Thus, “it is by grace you have been saved through allegiance” to Jesus the Christ (Eph 2:8, Bates’s translation, 4). This is a marked departure from the standard rendering of this and most other NT instances of the term pistis, which is to say: Bates has picked a fight with a lot of people. His argument, however, is robust and demands a close reading from anyone who would immediately dismiss the thesis out of hand.

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A Unique Gift to World Christianity
 
A Feature Review of 
 

Born from Lament:
The Theology and Politics of Hope in Africa

Emmanuel Katongole

Paperback: Eerdmans, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  
 
Reviewed by James Matichuk
 
 
 
I first encountered the work of Fr. Emmanuel Katongole in Reconciling All Things (IVP 2009), a book he co-authored with Chris Rice. That book was a user-friendly guide, discussing the Christian resources for reconciliation, and included an excellent chapter on lament.  This, alongside several other reflections, convinced me of the power and place of lament in Christian Spirituality. Since then, Katongole has written several books reflecting theologically on politics and violence in Africa and ethics.

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Here are 5 essential ebooks on sale now that are worth checking out:
( Dallas Willard, Annie Dillard, N.T. Wright,
 MORE )

 

THEOLOGY CLASSICS –
15 Essential Ebooks Under $3ea!
  

 

Via our sister website Thrifty Christian Reader
To keep up with all the latest ebook deals,
be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook

  

#1:
The Divine Conspiracy: Rediscovering Our Hidden Life In God

Dallas Willard

*** $1.99 ***

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Saturday (Sept 30) is the Feast Day of St. Jerome (347-420 CE)…

Jerome was a priest, confessor, theologian and historian. He was born at Stridon, a village near Emona on the border of Dalmatia and Pannonia . He is best known for his translation of most of the Bible into Latin (the translation that became known as the Vulgate), and his commentaries on the Gospels. His list of writings is extensive

The protégé of Pope Damasus I, who died in December of 384, Jerome was known for his teachings on Christian moral life, especially to those living in cosmopolitan centers such as Rome. In many cases, he focused his attention to the lives of women and identified how a woman devoted to Jesus should live her life. This focus stemmed from his close patron relationships with several prominent female ascetics who were members of affluent senatorial families.

He is recognized as a Saint and Doctor of the Church by the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Lutheran Church, and the Anglican Communion. (Bio via Wikipedia)
 
Here is an insightful, and perpetually relevant clip from his writings… 
 
 

On Making Use of Secular Writings in Theology
From Letter 70 – To Magnus, An Orator of Rome

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With Rest and With Celebration
 
A Review of

A Brief History of Sunday:
From the New Testament to the New Creation
Justo González

Paperback: Eerdmans, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Alisa Williams
 
 
 

*** This review originally appeared on
SpectrumMagazine.org

 Reprinted with permission of the reviewer.

 
Growing up Seventh-day Adventist, it always seemed strange to me that the majority of Christians worship on Sunday. Though I attended Adventist schools from kindergarten through university, and we often discussed the importance and “rightness” of Saturday as the proper day of worship, the why behind Sunday worship and the how it came to be were never addressed. I remember asking the questions, but the abrupt, “well other Christians are just WRONG” and the more toxic (and inaccurate), “it’s the Catholics fault,” weren’t helpful to my understanding. Over the years, I’ve heard references to Constantine’s role in Sunday worship, but it all seemed a bit muddy.

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A Deeper Exploration
 
A Feature Review of 
 

Reading the Gospels
with Karl Barth

Daniel Migliore, Ed.

Paperback: Eerdmans, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]
 
Reviewed by Allen Stanton
 
 
 
I grew up as an evangelical in a fairly conservative denomination. As I developed a theological imagination and began asking my own questions about my faith, I was often pointed in the direction of staunch neo-Calvinists. Their understanding of sin, election, free will, and justification left much for me to be desired. Each question I asked resulted in a reference to Paul. I could not make sense of Paul – he seemed angry, harsh, and judgmental. His theology, which was deemed conclusive, seemed lacking. Worst of all, I could not make sense of how Paul interacted with this person called Jesus. The way I was being taught to read Paul seemed so at odds with the revelation that comes from reading the Gospel of Luke or the Gospel of John. Finally, in frustration, I stopped reading scripture altogether.

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