Archives For Sufjan Stevens

 

Too often in our consumer culture, we jump over the season Advent and straight into Christmas. It is especially easy for us to do so with the holiday music to which we listen.

As we prepare for the beginning of Advent on Sunday, we offer this playlist of Advent-themed songs. Some of these are were not necessarily written as Advent songs, but they wrestle with vital themes of the season nonetheless. 
 

A SPOTIFY PLAYLIST

*** includes most, but not all the songs below
Browse the list below for other excellent songs 
that are NOT available on Spotify

 

  1. Josh Garrels
    O Come, O Come Emmanuel
    from The Light Came Down


  2.  
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“My music is just about story telling. I don’t have much to say, and I’m not trying to change anyone’s mind. I’m just singing through conviction about what I love and what I care about, starting with the very small.
– Singer/Songwriter Sufjan Stevens,
born on this day in 1975

 
Poem of the Day:
The Summer Rain
by Henry David Thoreau
 

Kindle Ebook of the Day:
Fast Forward to Mission
by Alan Hirsch – FREE!!!
 
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The Wake Up Call – July 1, 2014

 

The Wake Up CallThe Wake Up Call –
19 December 2012

Like the smell of strong coffee wafting down the hall, we offer a few book-related thoughts and stories to jumpstart your day…

 

*** Receive an email with The Wake Up Call (and daily ERB posts) in your inbox each morning! Sign up for The Daily Book Morsel

 


 

Start your day by savoring Three lovely Advent poems by Madeleine L’Engle

 

“Those who have no record of what their forebears have accomplished lose the inspiration which comes from the teaching of biography and history.”  – Carter Woodson, African-American Historian, born on this day in 1875
***  Books by Carter Woodson

 

“If I could I would always work in silence and obscurity, and let my efforts be known by their results.” – Novelist Emily Bronte, who died on this day in 1848
*** Books by Emily Bronte

 

Book News:

Thanks be to God for this new day, may it be full of beauty and grace!

The Wake Up Call image via WikiMedia Commons

 

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The Wake Up CallThe Wake Up Call –
3 December 2012

Like the smell of strong coffee wafting down the hall, we offer a few book-related thoughts and stories to jumpstart your day…

 

*** Receive an email with The Wake Up Call (and daily ERB posts) in your inbox each morning! Sign up for The Daily Book Morsel



BESTSELLER LISTS:

 

“Art hurts. Art urges voyages – and it is easier to stay at home.” Poet Gwendolyn Brooks, who died on this day in 2000.

 

“Only in men’s imagination does every truth find an effective and undeniable existence. Imagination, not invention, is the supreme master of art as of life. ” – Novelist Joseph Conrad, who was born on this day in 1857

 

Book News:



 

Thanks be to God for this new day, may it be full of beauty and grace!

The Wake Up Call image via WikiMedia Commons

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Since we are not running a new issue today, we thought you might be interested in seeing the most popular reviews/pages on the ERB site over the last six months:

  1. 2009 Englewood Honor Books [Special Issue – 31 Dec 2009]
  2. LEAVINGS: Poems by Wendell Berry [Vol. 2, #44]
  3. The Sacredness of Questioning Everything by David Dark. [Vol. 2, #21]
  4. DEEP CHURCH by Jim Belcher. [Vol. 2, #38]
  5. Anthony Flint’s WRESTLING WITH MOSES [Vol. 2, #43]
  6. A MILLION MILES by Donald Miller [Midweek Edition – 29 Sept 2009 ]
  7. Sufjan Stevens’ film THE BQE [Vol. 2, #43]

 

“To See the Fissures and
Hear the Rumblings”

A Review of
The BQE .

a film by Sufjan Stevens.

Reviewed by Chris Smith.

The BQE .
A film by Sufjan Stevens.
Copyright 2009, Asthmatic Kitty Records.

Buy now: [ Amazon ]


“Listening has something to do with being willing to change ourselves and change our world” – Sr. Joan Chittister

THE BQE - Sufjan StevensSufjan Stevens’ new movie The BQE is one of the finest and most creative works of social criticism in recent memory.  The film, commissioned by the Brooklyn Academy of Music, primarily features footage of traffic on the twisting and often congested highway known as the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway (BQE).  Stevens intersperses other footage from Brooklyn (architecture, waterways, amusement parks), but his primary counterpoint is three colorfully-clad female hula hoop spinners, working under the pseudonyms Botanica, Quantus and Electress.  As a complement to the movie, Stevens has also produced a comic book in which the three hula-hoopers are portrayed as super-heroes who fight the evil Dr. Moses – a reference to Robert Moses, the progress-oriented urban planner who designed the BQE.  Stevens’ cinematography – presented in a triptych format – captures the winding, free-for-all insanity of the BQE.  In his artist’s statement about the film, Stevens observes that the twisting design of the BQE was mandated by navigating through an already-well-established city with a variety of geographical features like rivers, islands and tidal straits and by the NIMBY (not-in-my-backyard) politics that kept the BQE out of prestigious neighborhoods, like Brooklyn Heights.  As Stevens’ comic book illustrates in its simplistic way, the critiques that the BQE raises are aimed primarily at Robert Moses and his visions of cities designed around technological concepts of progress that pay little heed to the holistic health of humanity.  Moses, for instance, designed parks that were “fiercely antagonistic to the natural, bucolic and egalitarian…more prison yard than public park” (Stevens artist statement), and instead were typically focused around competitive, athletic endeavors.  Thus, hula hoopers serve to contrast these focused notions of progress – speeding ahead pell-mell into the future like the BQE traffic on any given day – with the circular motion of the hula hoop, a symbol of a recreational idleness (a la Tom Hodgkinson), which spins in harmony with a person’s motions and never seems to get anywhere.  Stevens further exposits the hula hoop in his artist’s statement:

[The] Hula hoop couldn’t be more at odds with modernity.  Americans of the 1950s were linear people, hard working and industrious.  They fought world wars, drove big cars, and built mammoth roadways in the name of progress.  Their popular sports reflected the same: baseball and football were competitive and strategic games … The hoop couldn’t be more different.  It required no teams.  It wasn’t competitive. It wasn’t linear.  It was philosophically personal and metaphysically absurd, a gratuitous recreation built around a simple circular tube of plastic meant for nothing more than idle enjoyment and exercise.

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Here are two huge events that will be taking place here in Indy in the next two weeks:

1) A showing of Sufjan Stevens movie BQE
w/ music by Osso and DM Stith
Sunday Nov. 1st, 4PM. The Toby Theatre, Indy Museum of Art.

Event details from the IMA:
http://www.imamuseum.org/calendar/ossobqestith

Trailer for BQE:

2) COMMUNITY and CREATIVITY IN RESISTING CONSUMERISM

An Evening with Shane Claiborne
Author of
The Irresistible Revolution, Follow Me to Freedom and other books

Friday November 13 – 7PM
ENGLEWOOD CHRISTIAN CHURCH
57 N. Rural St.- Indianapolis – Near-eastside

Admission is FREE //
(An offering will be taken to support Shane’s work.)
ARRIVE EARLY // Doors open @ 6PM. Seating is limited!

INVITE YOUR FRIENDS !!!
– Facebook invite:  http://bit.ly/ZdoZ6
– Use this printable flyer:
http://englewoodcc.com/consumingfire/shane-claiborne.pdf

This event is part of the
Through the Consuming Fire Conference:
A Conversation on Economic Faithfulness in an Age of Consumerism
http://englewoodcc.com/consumingfire/