Archives For Saints

 

St. Julia of Corsica

Today, May 23, is the feast day of St. Julia of Corsica, a martyr of the fifth century.

 

Her story… 

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Today, May 21, is the feast day of Franz Jagerstatter, an Austrian martyr executed by the Nazis during WWII.

 

Review of Franz Jagerstatter’s
Letters and Papers from Prison

 

His story… 

 
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St. Felix of Cantalice

Today, May 18, is the feast day of St. Felix of Cantalice, the first Capuchin friar to be named a saint.

 
Felix of Cantalice, O.F.M. Cap., was born on 18 May 1515 to peasant parents in Cantalice, Italy, in the central Italian region of Lazio. Canonized by Pope Clement XI in 1712, he was the first Capuchin friar to be named a saint.

 

His story…

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St. Possidius

Today, May 17, is the feast day of St. Possidius, a North African saint who was a student of St. Augustine, and one of Augustine’s earliest biographers.

 
St. Possidius (5th century) was a friend of St. Augustine of Hippo who wrote a reliable biography and an indiculus or list of his works. He was bishop of Calama in the Roman province of Numidia. (via Wikipedia)
 

READ St. Possidius’s
Life of St. Augustine

 

His story…

 
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St. Brendan

Today, May 16, is the feast day of St. Brendan the Navigator, who is believed to have lived in the sixth century.

 
Saint Brendan of Clonfert (c. AD 484 – c. 577), called “the Navigator”, “the Voyager”, “the Anchorite”, and “the Bold”, is one of the early Irish monastic saints and one of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland. He is primarily renowned for his legendary quest to the “Isle of the Blessed”, also denominated “Saint Brendan’s Island”.

READ MORE about St. Brendan’s life, including an outline of the story of his voyage, on Wikipedia.
 

J.R.R. Tolkien’s Poem:
The Death of St. Brendan

 
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St. Dymphna

Today, May 15, is the feast day of St. Dymphna, a teenage martyr who is believed to have lived in the seventh century.

Dymphna resisted the incestuous sexual abuse and advances of her father, and ultimately her resistance infuriated her father to the point of him beheading her.

Although she lived in a very different era than our twenty-first century world, Dymphna’s adamant resistance to this sexual abuse makes her a striking candidate for a patron saint of the #MeToo movement.
 

Other Women Saints
Whose Stories You Should Know

 

St. Dymphna’s Story:

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Saturday (Sept 30) is the Feast Day of St. Jerome (347-420 CE)…

Jerome was a priest, confessor, theologian and historian. He was born at Stridon, a village near Emona on the border of Dalmatia and Pannonia . He is best known for his translation of most of the Bible into Latin (the translation that became known as the Vulgate), and his commentaries on the Gospels. His list of writings is extensive

The protégé of Pope Damasus I, who died in December of 384, Jerome was known for his teachings on Christian moral life, especially to those living in cosmopolitan centers such as Rome. In many cases, he focused his attention to the lives of women and identified how a woman devoted to Jesus should live her life. This focus stemmed from his close patron relationships with several prominent female ascetics who were members of affluent senatorial families.

He is recognized as a Saint and Doctor of the Church by the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Lutheran Church, and the Anglican Communion. (Bio via Wikipedia)
 
Here is an insightful, and perpetually relevant clip from his writings… 
 
 

On Making Use of Secular Writings in Theology
From Letter 70 – To Magnus, An Orator of Rome

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Today (September 27) is the Feast of St. Vincent DePaul… 

Here is his story:

(Adapted from The Catholic Encyclopedia)

“Charity is the cement which binds communities to God
and persons to one another ”
– St. Vincent DePaul

Born at Pouy, Gascony, France, in 1580 (though some authorities have said 1576); Vincent died at Paris, 27 September, 1660. Born of a peasant family, he made his humanities studies at Dax with the Cordeliers, and his theological studies, interrupted by a short stay at Saragossa, were made at Toulouse where he graduated in theology. Ordained in 1600 he remained at Toulouse or in its vicinity acting as tutor while continuing his own studies. Brought to Marseilles for an inheritance, he was returning by sea in 1605 when Turkish pirates captured him and took him to Tunis. He was sold as a slave, but escaped in 1607 with his master, a renegade whom he converted.

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Seven Martyred Monks of Gafsa
Liberatus, Boniface, Servus, Rusticus,
Rogatus, Septimus, and Maximus

Martyred 483 A.D.

 

Today (August 17) is the traditional feast day for these seven martyred monks.  This is their story… 

HUNERIC, the Arian Vandal king in Africa, in the seventh year of his reign, published fresh edicts against the Catholics, and ordered their monasteries to be demolished everywhere. Seven monks, named Liberatus, Boniface, Servus, Rusticus, Rogatus, Septimus, and Maximus, who lived in a monastery near Gafsa, in the province of Byzacena, were at that time summoned to Carthage. They were first tempted with great promises, but as they remained constant in the belief of the Trinity, and of one Baptism, they were loaded with irons and thrown into a dark dungeon.

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Today, July 20, is the Feast Day of St. Margaret of Antioch

 

The story of this important saint…
Adapted from The Catholic Encyclopedia by Marina Konow
 

“Threatened with death unless she renounced the Christian faith, the holy virgin refused to adore the gods of the empire and an attempt was made to burn her, but the flames, we are told in her Acts, left her unhurt. “

 
 

St. Margaret of Antioch was a virgin and martyr. Also called Marina, she belonged to Pisidian Antioch in Asia Minor, where her father was a pagan priest. Her mother dying soon after her birth, Margaret was nursed by a pious woman who lived not far from Antioch. Having embraced Christianity and consecrated her virginity to God, Margaret was disowned by her father, adopted by her nurse, and lived in the country keeping sheep with her foster mother (in what is now Turkey).

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