Archives For Reading

 

TODAY is the birthday of the poet
Anne Sexton, born 1928.

In remembrance of the poet, we offer three recordings of her reading poems…


Gods
Anne Sexton

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Today is the release day for John Green’s new novel…

Turtles All the Way Down
John Green

Hardback: Dutton Books, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 

Listen to John Green reading the
first chapter from this new book… 

 
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We reviewed this excellent new collection of poems in our fall magazine issue… 
 

Phases: Poems 
Mischa Willett

Paperback: Cascade Books, 2017.
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

*** SUBSCRIBE to our magazine!

 
Listen to the poet reading “Ocean of Storms,” the first section of poems from this new collection:
 
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Today (Aug. 31) marks the birthday of poet Christian Wiman…

 *** Read our interview with the poet

In honor of the occasion, we offer a series of video clips of Wiman reading his poems…

*** Books by Christian Wiman

Rust:

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Inspired by this great public radio interview with Bruce Handy, author of the new book, Wild Things: The Joy of Reading Children’s Literature as an Adult, I asked my Facebook friends for their favorite kids books that they have re-read as adults.

“Images from children’s books — a great green room and a red balloon, the white witch’s Turkish Delight, a lean and wicked cat in a red top hat — act as madeleines (or portkeys, or time turners, or rabbit holes, or wardrobes) calling up sleepiness, childhood rooms, grilled cheeses, long parental legs coming in and out of rooms, and that particular, pleasant ache of nostalgia. [Bruce Handy] … puts extraordinary care into replicating and preserving those feelings.” – NPR

Here are twenty of the most frequently-named
children’s books that are enjoyed by adults.

(In alphabetical order by author’s last name)

 

*** What other kids books
have you enjoyed as an adult?

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An Excellent Public Radio interview with Bruce Handy, author of the new book:
 

Wild Things: The Joy of Reading Children’s Literature as an Adult
Bruce Handy

Hardback: Simon and Schuster, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
 

Listen to this interview from WNYC… 

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An Open Letter

 
on 
 

Reading for the Common Good:
How Books Help Our Churches and Neighborhoods Flourish
C. Christopher Smith

Paperback: IVP Books, 2016
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
By Ragan Sutterfield

 

Dear Chris,

I couldn’t write a straight review of your book.  I know you too well and I couldn’t really be objective (not that that is an ideal).  Instead I want to offer a kind of open letter, a way to reflect with you about the book and invite others into the conversation.

There are two things that guided my understanding of Reading for the Common Good.  The first is that, like you, I cannot conceive of my faith apart from reading.  As a child my faith was formed by fiction—Narnia, A Wrinkle in Time, and so many others.  Later, it broadened to include philosophy and theology, the classics of the spiritual masters, and profound fiction such as The Brother Karamazov.  My reading now is steady and varied, this year I’ve enjoyed books about microbiology and woodworking, Christian ethics in a time of climate change and a novel about a community in the midst of a fracking boom.  All of it has something to say to my life as a Christian because such a life is lived through the God who is the creator and sustainer of all things.  This is something you get and communicate so clearly in Reading for the Common Good.  You share this deep love and dependence on books and you make that alive to the reader.

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How Shall We Then Read the Bible?
 
A Feature Review of 

Saving the Bible from Ourselves:
Learning to Read and Live the Bible Well
Glenn Paauw

Paperback: IVP Books, 2016.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 
Reviewed by James Dekker

 

Saving the Bible from Ourselves is one of those rare books that I wish were longer. A longer book might require delving into issues still more sensitive than Glenn Paauw already takes up. Exploring controversial themes might risk challenging unofficial, but strongly accepted Bible reading practices among Paauw’s intended audience. That is, “how to read” could veer onto significant, but bumpy paths of “how to interpret.”

For example, Saving the Bible’s greatest strength is Paauw’s repeated emphasis that readers must respect and learn to read the Bible’s various literary genres as originally intended. Thus he frequently emphasizes that Bible readers—laypersons, teachers, pastors—read the Bible’s histories, stories, poems, letters, gospels and apocalyptic visions first to understand their messages to original readers.  Only after rigorous analysis and wrestling with the texts’ earlier times and cultures is it fair to discern the meaning and application for today.

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I have been on the road for the last couple of weeks with my Slow Church co-author John Pattison, talking with churches throughout the southeastern U.S. about that book and my new book, Reading for the Common Good.  It’s been good to get the new book into people’s hands and to begin conversations about it.

Reading for the Common Good: How Books Help Our Churches and Neighborhoods Flourish
C. Christopher Smith

Paperback: IVP Books, 2016
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle

 

I am deeply grateful for these great reviews of the book that have been posted within the last couple of weeks. Here are some clips (with links to the full reviews)…

Joe Johnson:

“Working for the flourishing of churches, neighborhoods, and the world cannot be done without the empowering work of the Holy Spirit, and I think it’s a reasonable proposal to argue that reading is an important means by which the Spirit works. Reading for the Common Good makes a very interesting case for the communal importance of reading and conversation, and it paints a portrait of what local church life can be like that is well worth pursuing. I recommend it.”
[ Read the full review ]

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Donald_Trump

The Unexamined Life and Politics of Donald Trump

 

C. Christopher Smith

 
Donald Trump’s inclination to not read books has been highlighted in two recently published articles. Tony Schwartz, the ghostwriter who collaborated with Trump on his bestselling book, The Art of the Deal, was recently interviewed in The New Yorker, expressing his deep regrets for “presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is.”

Schwartz emphasized Trump’s inability to concentrate and his apparent lack of an attention span, and then proceeds to draw a connection between that and Trump’s seeming avoidance of reading books:

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