Archives For Race

 

Breaking Our Deep Connection to Whiteness

An Excerpt from Willie James’s Jennings’
paper that gave this work its title:

Can “White” People Be Saved?
Triangulating Race, Theology, and Mission
Sechrist, Ramirez-Johnson, Yong, Eds.

Paperback: IVP Books, 2018
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ] [ Kindle ]
 

We need at this moment a Christian faith that can start to break our deep connection to whiteness by resisting its vision of maturity. Suggesting a first step is all I have space for in this essay, but the first step is decisively the most important.

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This is a fascinating look at bias from a leading social psychologist:

Biased:
Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice
That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do
Jennifer L. Eberhardt

Hardback: Viking, 2019
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]  [ Audible ]
 

Listen to an interview with the author
from The New Yorker Radio Hour:

 
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[easyazon_image align=”left” height=”333″ identifier=”0802876889″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/5177FvIYVCL.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”236″]Reading the Signs of the Times
 
A Feature Review of
 

Burying White Privilege:
Resurrecting a Badass Christianity

 
Hardback: Eerdmans, 2018
Buy Now:  [ [easyazon_link identifier=”0802876889″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Amazon[/easyazon_link] ] [ [easyazon_link identifier=”B07MT4QB2N” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Audible[/easyazon_link] ]
[ Hearts & Minds Books ]

Reviewed by Sr Rhonda Miska
 
Christian social ethicist-activist Miguel De La Torre’s dust jacket bio describes him as “a modern Amos-like prophet.”  Burying White Privilege is a powerful tour de force which indeed echoes the social critique and righteous indignation of Old Testament prophets, offering a raw and unflinching analysis of Trump’s presidency and the religious leaders who distort the Gospel to support Trump’s political agenda.  The book is an expansion of De La Torre’s November 2017 essay “The Death of Christianity in the US,” published on the Baptist News Global website, which went viral on social media.  That essay opens with the provocative line, “Christianity has died in the hands of Evangelicals.” He goes on to write that “Evangelicalism ceased being a religious faith tradition following Jesus’ teachings concerning justice for the betterment of humanity when it made a Faustian bargain for the sake of political influence.”   

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[easyazon_image align=”left” height=”333″ identifier=”B07F3D88S1″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/51A9qCdEQyL.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”216″]Awaiting Something New to Arise
 
A Review of

We Hope for Better Things
Erin Bartels

 
Paperback: Revell, 2019
 
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[ [easyazon_link identifier=”0800734912″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Amazon[/easyazon_link] ][ [easyazon_link identifier=”B07F3D88S1″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Kindle[/easyazon_link] ] [ [easyazon_link identifier=”B07L9G7QRZ” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Audible[/easyazon_link] ]

 
 
Reviewed by Cynthia Beach
 
 
The gift of Erin Bartels’ debut novel, We Hope for Better Things, is a long-view on racism, or on the difficulty we seem to have, generation by generation, of loving our neighbor as ourselves. In this time slip novel, we see down the line of sight of racism, the hall of mirrors, the choices and stances—the beautiful and the ugly.

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[easyazon_image align=”left” height=”333″ identifier=”0310351847″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/41LZkyYQ7WL-1.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”218″]Toward Greater Courage and
More Authentic Community
 
A Review of

The Color of Life:
A Journey toward Love and Racial Justice
Cara Meredith

Paperback: Zondervan, 2019
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[ [easyazon_link identifier=”0310351847″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Amazon[/easyazon_link] ]  [ [easyazon_link identifier=”B07DT37ZDP” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Kindle[/easyazon_link] ] [  [easyazon_link identifier=”B07K7SPPJ9″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Audible[/easyazon_link] ]

 
Reviewed by David Swanson
 
 
On October 1, 1962, James Meredith enrolled in the University of Mississippi for his final year of college. What should have been a straightforward process involving applications and recommendations was anything but easy. Riots broke out on campus two nights before the arrival of the 29-year-old incoming senior. The possibility of the first African American student at Ole Miss was significant enough to draw concerted opposition from the governor of Mississippi and intervention by Robert Kennedy, then the U.S. Attorney General. Reflecting later, Meredith, a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, remembered his time at the university as a war, one which he won by forcing the federal government to intervene to defend his civil rights. This was a war against white supremacy and Meredith was willing to lead the charge, no matter how violent the response.

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[easyazon_image align=”left” height=”333″ identifier=”0310345030″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/51q3g0dSM8L.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”218″]An excerpt from this insightful new book…
 

Insider Outsider:
My Journey as a Stranger in White Evangelicalism
and My Hope for Us All

Bryan Loritts

Paperback: Zondervan, 2018
Buy Now:
[ [easyazon_link identifier=”0310345030″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Amazon[/easyazon_link] ]  [ [easyazon_link identifier=”B07FL9WMYM” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Kindle[/easyazon_link] ]  [ [easyazon_link identifier=”B07FDDRPVH” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Audible[/easyazon_link] ]

 
 

An Invitation
to Life Together

 
The slain corpse of Michael Brown has decimated the myth that we live in a post-racial society. The election of our nation’s first African-American president did not end racism. In many ways, we witnessed a fresh proliferation of conflicts between people of color and whites, the powerless and the powerful. In the aftermath of Brown’s demise, there have been riots in his hometown, as well as on social media. In the Christian community, the commentary has likewise been combustible, as one side has appealed to the “facts” of the case— Michael Brown had just stolen some cigars and could very well have been the aggressor—and the other side has spoken out of a deep well of hurt, dug for more than four hundred years with the shovels of racism and institutionalized segregation, where the value of a black life was on a par with that of a horse. So as Michael Brown’s body lay abandoned for hours on a street in Ferguson, Missouri, like some run-over possum or deer, it’s more than understandable that African Americans began to wonder, “What exactly is the value of a black life?”

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[easyazon_image align=”left” height=”333″ identifier=”0310597269″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/51rgvfXieML-3.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”216″]Confronted and Grieved
by the Sins of our Past.

A Feature Review of

The Color of Compromise:
The Truth about the American Church’s Complicity in Racism
Jemar Tisby

Hardback: Zondervan, 2019.
Buy Now:
[ [easyazon_link identifier=”0310597269″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Amazon[/easyazon_link] ]  [ [easyazon_link identifier=”B07BB6R827″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Kindle[/easyazon_link] ]  [ [easyazon_link identifier=”B07JVVCGQ6″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Audible[/easyazon_link] ]
[ 20% off retail – Hearts & Minds ]

Reviewed by Dorothy Littell Greco.
 
Writer, speaker, and historian (PhD Candidate, University of Mississippi) Jemar Tisby has created an authoritative masterpiece. The Color of Compromise relies on history as “the main vehicle to take us on a journey toward greater racial understanding.” And what a journey Tisby takes us on.

The author topples multiple sacred cows as he dismantles the prevailing textbook narrative that nearly deifies both the early European settlers as well as the men who wrote the Constitution. Yes, the document was vital for our nation, but it also legalized systemic racism—and misogyny. Had the Founding Fathers actually been willing to “establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defencefor everyone (as written in the preamble for the US Constitution), the history of the United States would have been radically different.

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[easyazon_image align=”left” height=”250″ identifier=”1501167995″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/517JX9oB21L.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”163″]This collection of short stories has been nominated for a number of awards this year (long-listed for the National Book Award, Finalist for the Kirkus Prize):

Heads of the Colored People: Stories
Nafissa Thompson-Spires

Hardback: Atria, 2018
Buy Now:
[ [easyazon_link identifier=”1501167995″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Amazon[/easyazon_link] ] [ [easyazon_link identifier=”B074ZNMCN8″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Kindle[/easyazon_link] ]  [ [easyazon_link identifier=”B07F6G9R9C” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Audible[/easyazon_link] ]

 

Listen to a great interview that Nafissa Thompson-Spires
did with NPR’s Audie Cornish:

 
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[easyazon_image align=”left” height=”333″ identifier=”0190618973″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/51F8tOus7LL.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”220″]Becoming We.
 
A Review of 
 

One in Christ:
Chicago Catholics and the Quest
for Interracial Justice

Karen Johnson

Hardback: Oxford UP, 2018
Buy Now:  [ [easyazon_link identifier=”0190618973″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Amazon[/easyazon_link] ]  [ [easyazon_link identifier=”B07F3B2PQT” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Kindle[/easyazon_link] ]

 
Reviewed by Claire Johnson
 
 
During this past Easter Break, I exited what was supposed to be a unified, city-wide prayer and worship service in my hometown of Nacogdoches, Texas. Instead, the event was marked with sharp racial divisions of black and white. Catholics and far-fetched liberals weren’t present, or if they were, the white, evangelical event planners had stripped their voices. The body of Christ was not unified. The service was held in a conservative, white Protestant church with white contemporary Protestant Christian music led by the white band from the Southern Baptist church down the street. White pastors from white Protestant churches led the inter-song devotionals. The façade of unity came only from the closeting of diversity. Unity with no diversity is not unity at all.

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[easyazon_image align=”left” height=”333″ identifier=”1631469207″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/51SkR12EpL-1.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”222″]Lament and Conversation

A Feature Review of 

White Picket Fences: Turning toward Love in a World Divided by Privilege
Amy Julia Becker

Paperback: NavPress, 2018
Buy Now:
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Reviewed by Cara Meredith

 

*** ENTER NOW
to win a copy of this book
!
(through Tues. Oct 16)

 
Sometimes realizing your privilege starts with looking at your bookshelf.

Perhaps like you, I’m a book person. I read and consume books like it’s my job, because sometimes it really is my job to learn and grow and put words to the stories and experiences of those who’ve gone before me. But it took me nearly three decades to realize that it was a privilege to even have than fifty books in my house, let alone to choose to read books about characters that looked like me written by people who looked like me.

After all, having the ability to choose is oftentimes the biggest privilege of all.

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