Archives For Playlists

 

LEngle-Disturb

One of the great challenges of the publishing industry in the twenty-first century is that it is overwhelmingly dominated by white males. One small part of the necessary corrective measures is for all of us to buy and read more books by authors who are not white males. 

Toward this end, here is a list of ten women authors, whose work you should be intimately familiar with. For this list, we have chosen well-established writers, who either are still alive or who have died within the last 50 years or so. We will run a list of younger women writers next week.

Buy and read everything that these women writers have published!

 

Flannery O’Connor

A Roman Catholic writer from Georgia, whose stories defined the Southern Gothic style. 

*** Books by Flannery O’Connor

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David Foster Wallace

Sunday (February 21) marks the birthday of David Foster Wallace, one of the most important American writers of the last quarter-century.

Although Wallace’s masterpieces are his novels, including Infinite Jest (1104 pages), these mammoth works can be intimidating for new readers, so we offer here a selection of his shorter works, for readers who want to immerse themselves slowly in Wallace’s work.

Also, for our readers who are fans of DFW’s work, there is an important new book that will be released next week:

The Gospel According to
David Foster Wallace:
Boredom and Addiction in an Age of Distraction
Adam S. Miller

Paperback: Bloomsbury, 2016
Buy now: [ Amazon ] [ Kindle ]

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Bonhoeffer-Bio

Yesterday marked the 110th anniversary of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s birth…

In honor of the occasion, we wanted to highlight a few lesser-known books by/about him:

You may have read The Cost of Discipleship, or Life Together, or even Eric Metaxes’s Bonhoeffer biography, but here are a few other important Bonhoeffer books, if you want to go deeper:
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Read More Poetry

Did you make a New Year’s resolution to read more poetry?

If not, it’s not too late to do so. 

“For me, poetry is a practice that is helping me begin to slow down and become more attentive. Learning to read a poem carefully trains us to pay extraordinary attention to the sounds and images of language that we might easily overlook in our haste. … Poems offer us an invitation to abide with their words.”

– ERB Editor, Chris Smith, In Defense of Poetry

To help you read more poetry, we will be publishing two lists of recommended poets.

Our first list featured classic poets, whose work is freely available in the public domain.  These poems are good because they have withstood the test of time, and because they are easily and freely accessible. Their drawbacks are that they are dated (Many of them, for instance, write in verse, a form that is widely rejected among poets today), and that although we have tried to make our list as diverse as possible, there tends to be less diversity (A hundred years ago or more, the vast majority of poets being published were white males).

Our second list, below, features the work of contemporary poets.

It will be beneficial to develop habits of reading poems from both of these lists. The classics help us understand the tradition of poetry, and contemporary poets wrestle with contemporary concerns in the forms of today.

Contemporary Poets:

Where possible, we have included a video of the poet reading from her or his work… Your local library will likely have books by at least some of these poets.

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Read More Poetry

Did you make a New Year’s resolution to read more poetry?

If not, it’s not too late to do so. 

“For me, poetry is a practice that is helping me begin to slow down and become more attentive. Learning to read a poem carefully trains us to pay extraordinary attention to the sounds and images of language that we might easily overlook in our haste. … Poems offer us an invitation to abide with their words.”

– ERB Editor, Chris Smith, In Defense of Poetry

To help you read more poetry, we will be publishing two lists of recommended poets.

This first list will feature classic poets, whose work is freely available in the public domain.  These poems are good because they have withstood the test of time, and because they are easily and freely accessible. Their drawbacks are that they are dated (Many of them, for instance, write in verse, a form that is widely rejected among poets today), and that although we have tried to make our list as diverse as possible, there tends to be less diversity (A hundred years ago or more, the vast majority of poets being published were white males).

Our second list, which will be posted next week, will feature the work of contemporary poets.

It will be beneficial to develop habits of reading poems from both of these lists. The classics help us understand the tradition of poetry, and contemporary poets wrestle with contemporary concerns in the forms of today.

Classic Poets:

All the poems in these books are in the public domain. Read them on your device, print them out, post them on your blog, slice them, dice them and remix them into your own poems. Most of all, have fun!

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