Archives For Myth

 

Myth-ing Persons

 
A review of 

The Inklings and King Arthur:
J.R.R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, C.S. Lewis and Owen Barfield on the Matter of Britain
 

Sørina Higgins, Ed.

Paperback: Apocryphile, 2018
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Reviewed by Sam Edgin
 

I remember, as a child, trying to find my definitive King Arthur book. Stories of fell swords and dangerous magic had seized me like they do many other children. I was fascinated by the possibilities of mysterious power carried within Christian relics, fresh with the adventures of Indiana Jones were running amok in my imagination. Mostly, though, I was harboring a strange obsession with the tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. It resonated within me, and I wanted more about Gawain and his bargains, steeped in chivalry and loyalty and hazy magic. I’m not sure I was ever sated – the efforts to find an Arthuriana found me Roger Lancelyn Green, whose Arthur and Gawain seemed lacking, but whose Robin Hood was so similar to the Robin Hood I saw in movies. Distracted, I seldom returned to Gawain and the castle in the forest.

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The Mac Myth

A Review of

Appletopia: Media Technology and the Religious Imagination of Steve Jobs
Brett Robinson

Hardback: Baylor Press, 2013.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

Reviewed by Adam P. Newton

 

Apple. Macintosh. Steve Jobs. iAnything. You’d have to be raising barns deep in Amish country, paddling the depths of the Amazon River Basin, or living on a far-flung Pacific island to not be familiar with the products made by the Apple brand. Even if you don’t use that technology, you probably have a very specific opinion about why you’ve never adopted any of those devices. I have hacker IT friends who only operate off undiluted Linux kernels, and even those folks have an iPhone or use iTunes for their digital music. And if you especially love Mac products, you’re lucky if detractors will let you off the hook by merely calling you a “fanboy” – the unlucky get told they’re members of a cult.

 

With his investigation into the religious ideas and philosophies that powered the big-picture worldview and day-to-day operations of Steve Jobs, Brett T. Robinson examines the life of this powerful innovator, inventor, and technological prophet. Appletopia serves as a pleasant though occasionally superficial discussion of how Jobs integrated artistic ideals into scientific exploration and marketing savvy to create a pop culture “event” in a world that’s become quite jaded toward larger meta-stories.

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