Archives For Michael Gorman

 

A Delightful Journey
into the Scriptural Story
 
A Review of 

Scripture and Its Interpretation:
A Global, Ecumenical Introduction to the Bible

Michael Gorman, Ed.

Hardback: Baker Academic, 2017.
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]   [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Chuck Sackett
 
 
In the introduction, Gorman identifies the limits imposed on a volume with such a broad subtitle. He readily admits that this work will be an overview at best. But, he also indicates something of his dream for the book at the end of the introduction when he uses the analogy of a library. He acknowledges that Scripture, like a library, may raise questions, invite you into a new world, and proposes interpretative approaches you’ve not considered. He concludes, “We hope to point you in the direction of some of these interesting questions, answers, and perspectives” (xxii).
Continue Reading…

 

 A Fresh Addition to the Discussion of Atonement

 A Feature Review of

The Death of the Messiah and the Birth of the New Covenant: A (Not So) New Model of Atonement

Michael Gorman

Paperback: Cascade Books, 2014
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 Reviewed by Jordan Kellicut

 

The current debates over the atonement and its implications for the doctrine of justification are desperately divergent.  The most popularized is the debate between N.T. Wright as a voice for the New Perspective on Paul, and John Piper as a New Calvinist.  Classic theories, like Ransom and Moral Influence, are also being repurposed.[1]  Yet there is no fully biblically integrated or wholly accepted theory.

Continue Reading…

 

Restoring “The Revelation” to the Church

A Brief Review of

Reading Revelation Responsibly.
Michael J. Gorman.
Paperback: Cascade Books, 2011.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]

Reviewed by Michael J. Bowling.

As I spend this year preaching through the Revelation, it has been my pleasure to read many specialty studies on this hotly debated, often misunderstood and sadly neglected part of Scripture. However, specialty studies do not address the present-day misunderstandings which have become a publishing and cinema phenomenon. The Left Behind Series of this generation and the works of Hal Lindsey, Salem Kirban and Tim LaHaye of the previous generation have created an environment which has reduced this grand book to entertainment or the dustbin of irrelevance. Eugene Peterson provided an alternative almost twenty-five years ago with his excellent book Reversed Thunder, but it made no attempt to respond to more popularized works. Ten years ago, Craig Koester brought thoughtful scholarship to bear on the reckless uses of the Revelation in his Revelation and the End of All Things. Last year, Nelson Kraybill’s theopolitical treatment of the Revelation, Apocalypse and Allegiance, simply dismisses the interpretations of Lindsey and LaHaye as “sadistic and escapist”. If only there was a guide that engages the popular works in a substantive way, while at the same time provide the reader with a link to the best in good scholarship; well, now we have it in Michael Gorman’s Reading Revelation Responsibly (released this year by Cascade Books/Wipf and Stock Publishers).

Continue Reading…