Archives For Makoto Fujimura

 

This week marks the release of the latest book by Makoto Fujimura, the renowned artist and author!

 
In honor of its release, we’re giving away
THREE copies of this new book…
 

Culture Care: Reconnecting with Beauty for Our Common Life
by Makoto Fujimura
Paperback: IVP Books

 
 

Enter to win a copy of this book!

Enter now to win (It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3!) :

Continue Reading…

 

Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

 

Lincoln in the Bardo: A Novel

George Saunders

Read the starred review from Publishers Weekly… 

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

 

Continue Reading…

 

Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

Silence and Beauty: Hidden Faith Born of Suffering

By Makoto Fujimura

Watch a trailer for this book

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

Continue Reading…

 

“The Poetics of the Creation”

 

A Review of
Refractions:
A Journey of Faith, Art, and Culture.

by Makoto Fujimura.

 Reviewed by Brent Aldrich.

 

Refractions:
A Journey of Faith, Art, and Culture.

Makoto Fujimura.
Paperback: NavPress, 2009.
Buy now:  [ Doulos Christou Books $20 ] [ Amazon ]


 In the beginning / – before space-time – /
was the Word / All that is, then, is true. / Poem. /

Creation is a poem. /
Poem, which is “creation” in Greek and thus /
St. Paul calls God’s Creation POIEMA, / …

Ernesto Cardenal, from Cosmic Canticle

Cardenal’s description of God as Poet, or of the creation as Poetry certainly finds resonance with Makoto Fujimura’s essays (formerly blog entries) compiled in his new book Refractions: A Journey of Faith, Art, and Culture. Fujimura, an artist living in New York and with close ties to Japan, a member of the Village Church and on the National Council for the Arts, has collected a selection of writings first published on his blog into this book that functions as art theory and criticism, theology and apologetics for the church, and a journal of daily life (the “faith, art and culture” of the subtitle).  The writings span a broad sample of Fujimura’s thoughts, but add up to a cohesive vision for art and for the church The essays are seemingly “fragments shored against my ruin,” as one of his favorite poets would put it, or, to continue in Cardenal’s poem, “With finite words an infinite meaning.”

One of Fujimura’s beginning premises is that art be about peacemaking. Quoting from Tolstoy, “art should cause violence to be set aside.” Fujimura elaborates that “the Greek word for peacemakers is eirenepoios, which can be interpreted as ‘peace-poets,’ suggesting that peace is a thing to be crafted or made. We need to seek ways to be not just ‘peacekeepers’ but to be engaged ‘peacemakers.’ In such a definition, peace (or the Hebrew word shalom) is not simply the absence of war but a thriving of our lives, where God uses our creativity as a vehicle to create the world that ought to be” (10). The act of peacemaking, then, a well as of art is bound up in a larger vision of ‘reconciling all things.’

Continue Reading…