Archives For Liberation Theology

 

Wesleyan Theology
that Yearns for Justice

A Feature Review of

No Religion but Social Religion: Liberating Wesleyan Theology
Joerg Rieger

Paperback: GBHEM Publishing, 2018
Buy Now:
Amazon ] [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Joseph Johnson

 

Liberation theology is often seen largely as a Roman Catholic movement born out of the socioeconomic struggles of the 1960’s and 1970’s in Latin America. There is, of course, much truth in this characterization, though liberation theology’s scope now extends well beyond Latin America when viewed in contemporary global perspective. In his introduction to The Cambridge Companion to Liberation Theology, Christopher Rowland echoes the words of pioneering Peruvian theologian Gustavo Gutiérrez when he points out that part of the significance of liberation theology for the wider Church has been its willingness to take on the challenge of “speaking of God in a world that is inhumane.” And in a world marked by so much suffering and injustice, this is clearly a necessary task.

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Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

See a book here that you’d like to review for us?
Contact us, and we’ll talk about the possibility of a review.

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Approaching the End: Eschatological Reflections on Church, Politics, and Life
By Stanley Hauerwas

Read a review of this book (and another recent Hauerwas one) here...

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A Review of

Passion of Christ, Passion of the World.
Leonardo Boff.
New Edition.
Paperback: Orbis Books, 2011.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]

Reviewed by Chris Smith.

With Holy Week almost upon us again, the time of the church year in which we pause to remember the arrest, trial, crucifixion, burial and resurrection of Jesus, I decided to read through Orbis Books’ new edition of Leonardo Boff’s book Passion of Christ, Passion of the World.  For those who are not familiar with Boff’s work, he is one of the main figures in the liberation theology movement, and certainly the best-known Brazilian liberation theologian.  I have previously read several of his other books, but had not read this one, so this seemed like a fitting time to do so.

Passion of Christ, Passion of the World is a challenging read in many regards.  One needs to proceed slowly through it, digesting as she goes.  Although Boff’s writing style tends toward the academic, the content of what he is saying offers a much steeper challenge than the way in which it is written.  The essence of Boff’s argument is that we are called to follow Christ in entering into the suffering of the world.  However, in the U.S. where not only is suffering foreign to us, but where we also go to extraordinary lengths to avoid suffering (and to cover up our own sufferings), how are we even to begin to make sense of Boff’s work?  Our religious approaches here in the U.S. to the suffering and death of Christ, often serve to conceal the many ways in which our lifestyles subject others around the globe to suffering and death.  To quote Boff:

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A Brief Review of

Hope In An Age of Despair.
Albert Nolan.

Paperback: Orbis Books, 2009.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]

Reviewed by R. Dean Hudgens.

Fr. Albert Nolan has been an important figure in South African liberation theology for several decades.  A twenty-fifth anniversary edition of his book Jesus Before Christianity was published in 2001.  This smaller volume (edited and introduced by Stan Muyebe) brings together articles, essays, and homilies from a variety of sources.  It represents a helpful introduction to Nolan’s life and work and contains a “selected bibliography” of his writings dating back to 1976.  Nolan has been a notable leader in the Catholic church and the Dominican Order in South Africa during the difficult years of apartheid and beyond.  He chose to remain there even when offered a distinguished ecclesiastical position in Rome.  He was a primary contributor to the 1985 Kairos Document which protested South African apartheid policy and provoked much attention around the world.  Nolan’s liberation theology is strongly christocentric in theory and mystical-prophetic in practice.  This collection provides a very wholistic perspective on his work as Nolan addresses the biblical basis for justice, the need for a life of prayer and contemplation, and the concrete spiritual and physical needs that continue to be manifest in South Africa today.  Speaking from a situation that once seemed so thoroughly without hope; a situation in which for so long the world saw the church at its oppressive worst; Nolan continues to speak with a unique authority as a representative of a faith-filled and courageous church, that has demonstrated the gospel at it’s liberating and reconciling best.  This is not a great book, but it comes from a great man with a great faith and an enduring hope.

 

In our continuing effort to fund the publication and free distribution of The Englewood Review, we are going to be collaborating more intentionally with Christian Book Distributors.  Primarily, we will be offering you the opportunity to buy bargain books from CBD that we think of are interest.  Buying books this way is a win / win / win proposition.  You get great books for a great price,  CBD gets the sale and we get an excellent referral fee from CBD.  These books make great gifts!

 

This week’s bargain books (Click to learn more/purchase):

  • Out of Egypt: Biblical Theology and Biblical Interpretation.  Craig Bartholomew, et al. (Hardback) $4.99 – Save 88%!!!
  • A Holy Meal: The Lord’s Supper in the Life of the Church.
    by Gordon T. Smith
    (Paperback)   $3.99 – Save 73%!!!
  •  Liberating the Future: God, Mammon and Theology.
    Joerg Rieger, editor (Paperback)   $3.99 – Save 78%!!!