Archives For Kate Bowler

 

The Festival of Faith and Writing at Calvin College last week was extraordinary as always!  As expected, it was a book-lovers delight, overflowing with extraordinary works of all genres.  I didn’t get to attend many sessions, but I talked to many festival-goers and checked in occasionally on social media. Here are ten books that had the FFW crowd buzzing.

 

These are not necessarily the best books, or the newest ones, just ones that I frequently heard people talking about (or whose authors they were talking about). Many other books that were featured at the Festival will be covered here on our website or in our print magazine over the coming months.

 

By ERB Editor C. Christopher Smith

 

   

Everything Happens for a Reason: And Other Lies I’ve Loved 

Kate Bowler

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One of the best new releases of last week was:
 

Everything Happens for a Reason: And Other Lies I’ve Loved
 
Kate Bowler

 
Hardback: Random House, 2018
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 

Listen to an extraordinary interview
that the author did with NPR’s Terry Gross:

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Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

  

Everything Happens for a Reason: And Other Lies I’ve Loved

Kate Bowler

*** Read an op-ed from the NY Times based on this book

 

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

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The Growing Influence of the Prosperity Movement

A Review of

Blessed: A History of the American Prosperity Gospel

Kate Bowler

 

Hardback: Oxford UP, 2013
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Douglas Connelly.
 
If you are looking for a critique of the prosperity gospel or a biblical evaluation of its teaching, this is not the book for you.  In her first book – an adaptation of her doctoral dissertation – Kate Bowler tells the story of how the American prosperity gospel began and developed, and she introduces us to some of the main prosperity preachers.  But Bowler does not take a side in the debate over prosperity teaching.  Instead she tries (and largely succeeds) to give an even-handed account of how such teaching set its roots in American religious culture and how it grew into the mega-influence it is today.

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