Archives For Justice

 

Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

  

Love Undocumented: Risking Trust in a Fearful World

Sarah Quezada

*** Read an interview with the author

 

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

Continue Reading…

 

Foundational Justice

A Review of

A Palestinian Theology of Liberation: The Bible, Justice, and the Palestine-Israel Conflict
Naim Stifan Ateek

Paperback: Orbis Books, 2017

Buy Now: [ Amazon ] [Kindle ]

Reviewed by Leroy Seat
 
 

Naim Stifan Ateek (b. 1937) is an ethnic Arab Palestinian, a citizen of Israel, and an Anglican priest. His slim but highly significant book is the fruit of decades of theological thought and praxis.

Nearly thirty years ago Ateek wrote a closely related book, Justice and Only Justice: A Palestinian Theology of Liberation. In that same year, 1989, he founded Sabeel Ecumenical Liberation Theology Center in Jerusalem. That organization has continued to grow in influence through the years with chapters in several countries. One such chapter is FOSNA (Friends of Sabeel North America).
Continue Reading…

 

Peace, Justice, and Restoration
 
A Review

The Last Christians:
Stories of Persecution, Flight, and Resilience in the Middle East

Andreas Knapp

 
Paperback: Plough Books, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ] [Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Peggy Faw Gish
 
 
What has the violence in Iraq and Syria meant for the Christians there? Why have so many fled their countries and are among the over a million refugees who’ve flooded into Europe? As minorities in their societies, these Christians have quietly endured threat and injustice, and some of the oldest Christian cultures are in danger of extinction.

Andreas Knapp’s book, The Last Christians: Stories of Persecution, Flight, and Resilience in the Middle East, translated into English and published in the US in 2917, by Plough Publishing House, alerts us to the struggle and suffering of refugees, Christians, as well as those of other faiths, who have fled violent, chaotic situations and deserve our compassion.  The stories in this book are tragic, but also inspiring, telling about Christians who have given up so much for their faith, remained faithful when facing threat, and have resisted bitterness, hate, or revenge.  Instead they seek the path of forgiveness, loving one’s enemy, and nonviolence.

Continue Reading…

 

Rev. William Barber II has been called by Cornel West,  
“the closest thing this generation will have to a Martin Luther King, Jr.”

 
His most recent book is

The Third Reconstruction: How a Moral Movement Is Overcoming the Politics of Division and Fear
Rev. William Barber II

Paperback: Beacon Press, 2016
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 

Rev. Barber was interviewed this week by Trevor Noah on the Daily Show. Watch the interview… 

Continue Reading…

 

Not for The Faint of Heart

 
A Feature Review of 
 

Break Open the Sky: Saving Our Faith from a Culture of Fear
Stephan Bauman

Paperback: Multnomah, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]   [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Jeff Crosby
 
 

Chicago’s historic Fourth Presbyterian Church at the corner of Michigan Avenue (the “Miracle Mile”) and Chestnut, a Gothic Revival masterpiece designed by famed architect Ralph Adams Cram, opened more than a century ago. Since its first worship services in 1912, the church has played host to numerous cultural and spiritual gatherings of importance alongside its weekly proclamation of scripture and its robust outreach to people – both the well-heeled and the down-on-their luck – in the heart of the near north side of the city.

Continue Reading…

 

One of this week’s best new book releases is:
 

Locking Up Our Own:
Crime and Punishment in Black America

James Forman, Jr.

Hardback: FSG Books, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]   [ Kindle ]
 
 
 
 
Listen to an NPR interview with the author from All Things Considered… 
Continue Reading…

 

A Call to Life

 
A review of 

Nobody Cries When We Die: God, Community, and Surviving to Adulthood
Patrick Reyes

Paperback: Chalice Press, 2016
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
 
Reviewed by Ryan Johnson
 
 
Racism, violence, hatred, shootings.  Headlines are filled with these injustices and most believe there is little hope to enact lasting change.  For many this is the narrative of American society.  This is the day-to-day life for millions of individuals.  We are left asking the question what do we do?  More than that:  What are we called to do?  This question leaves many of us without an answer, or with still more questions.  It is a question that cannot live solely in the theoretical realm but must be lived out through practical action.  Thus, Patrick Reyes’s book Nobody Cries When We Die serves as a step toward answering that question with the urgency it deserves.

Continue Reading…

 

A Shared Justice For All People

A Brief Review of 

A Christian Justice
for the Common Good

Tex Sample

Paperback: Abingdon, 2016
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 

Reviewed by Rafael Andres Rodriguez

 

A Christian Justice for the Common Good is Tex Sample’s quick primer for the community activist, clergy, layperson, and student seeking to engage the issues of justice from within a local church context.  His treatment on the issues is interwoven with compelling narrative, reminding the reader that, in the words of John Milbank, “narrating is a more basic category than explanation or understanding.”[i] Within these pages is a mind deeply devoted to Jesus Christ as God’s self-disclosure, grappling with what it means to work for the good of all.

Continue Reading…

 

A Truly Evangelical Perception of Justice

A Feature Review of

Return to Justice:
Six Movements that Reignited Our Contemporary Evangelical Conscience
Soong-Chan Rah / Gary VanderPol

Paperback: Brazos Press, 2016.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

Reviewed by Kevin Book-Satterlee

 

Rah and VanderPol’s book is an important brief history of an undercurrent of biblical justice found in American evangelicalism. It is a history of struggle for recognition, and provides key snapshots in an album of this continued Return to Justice. The book is born from the authors’ obvious experience and study, and seeks to reintegrate the bifurcation of evangelism and justice. The authors highlight and esteem known figures and institutions such as John Perkins, World Vision, Sojourners, and Samuel Escobar, among others. These key figures and their stories formed the historical backdrop and narrative for reinvigorating biblical justice as a key tenet of evangelicalism, challenging a dominant American, white male, middle-class status quo that has historically recoiled from social gospel “tendencies” and issues of biblical justice in preference and focus towards an individualistic approach of evangelism-by-proclamation and personalized salvation experience.

Continue Reading…

 

Imagining a Better Form of Justice

 
A Review of

Executing Grace:
How the Death Penalty Killed Jesus and Why It’s Killing Us
Shane Claiborne

Paperback: HarperOne, 2016
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

Reviewed by Douglas Graves

 

Over the years, Shane Claiborne’s work and voice for social justice issues have challenged many in the church to reconsider the role of faith in their everyday lives. His latest book, Executing Grace: How the Death Penalty Killed Jesus and Why It’s Killing Us, is written in the same vein and certainly has the power to change many Christians’ perspectives on capital punishment. Surprisingly, the book has quite an optimistic ending, encouraging readers that the death penalty is on the run. But Claiborne does much more than simply dismiss any legitimacy still given to the death penalty. By telling stories of individuals behind the numbers and offering a refreshing view of God’s character and his expression of grace, Claiborne invites his readers to imagine a more fulfilling form of justice.

Continue Reading…