Archives For James Cone

 

Tomorrow (August 5th) is the birthday of theologian James Cone.  In honor of the occasion, we offer this introductory reading guide to his work.

We’ve ordered this list in the order that we think the books should be read, and we offer a brief explanation of why each book was included. We’ve included excerpts of most the books via Google Books.

1)  A Black Theology of Liberation

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Our latest book giveaway…

We’re giving away 6 copies of :

Book Giveaway -James Cone's THE CROSS AND THE LYNCHING TREE

James Cone’s The Cross and the Lynching Tree
[ Read our Review ]


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Enter to win a Free copy of this book
(It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3!) :

NOTE: You may enter to win once per day as long as the contest is running…
(Additional entries only need to complete steps #2 and #3.)

1) Receive our free weekly online edition via email – or –
LIKE our Facebook page (LGT: More info… )

2) Post the following message on your blog, Facebook Page, or on Twitter:
I just entered to win one of six copies of James Cone’s THE CROSS AND THE LYNCHING TREE from @ERBks! You can too: http://su.pr/93syC4

3) Leave a comment below noting which option you chose
for #1 **and** a link to your post for #2 before 12AM ET on Friday January 27, 2011.
(Leaving a comment is essential as we will draw the giveaway winners from among the comments left.)

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We will draw the winners at random after the giveaway ends, and will notify them within a week.

 

Cross and Lynching TreeImmersing ourselves Deeper
into God’s Mission of
Reconciling Creation

A Review of

The Cross and the Lynching Tree.
James Cone.
Hardback: Orbis Books, 2011.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

Reviewed by Chris Smith.

I have long had a deep respect for the work of James Cone.  I don’t always agree with him, but even when I don’t I find his work compelling and engaging.  Although I am sympathetic to his emphasis on liberation theology, I don’t agree with the way in which he leaves the door open for the use of violent means in pursuit of liberation. Similarly, I’ve never been able to accept his embrace of both Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X, as “advocating different methods that corrected and complemented each other, as they worked for the same goal – the liberation of black people from white supremacy.”  Despite my disagreements with other parts of his work, I am convinced that in his newest book The Cross and the Lynching Tree, he is spot on.

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