Archives For Horror

 

A Book You Can Sink Your Teeth Into?

 

A Feature Review of

Dracula and Philosophy: Dying to Know
(Popular Culture and Philosophy Series)
Edited by Nicolas Michaud and Janelle Pötzsch

Paperback: Open Court, 2015.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

Reviewed by John W. Morehead

 

Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula is one of the most influential books ever written. It has been featured in a number of different forums, including stage plays, films, television programs, graphic novels, and more. It has also led to a wealth of discussion over the years. One of the latest comes in Dracula and Philosophy, an exploration of philosophical issues that come by way of reflection on this classic novel’s horror story.

 

Dracula and Philosophy is comprised of five sections and twenty-four chapters. Section I is “The Downside of Undeath,” with five chapters. The second section is “A Vampire’s Values” that includes five chapters. Another five chapters make up Section III with “What’s It Like to Be Dracula?”.  The fourth section discusses “Why We’re Afraid” of the undead count in five chapters, while Section V explores “From the Dracula Files” through four chapters. This book also includes an introduction, a listing of references, contributor bios, and an index.

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Classic Horror Novels

 
 

This is the latest post in a series that will, in effect, create a library of classics that are available as free ebooks.
 
Last week’s post: [ Children’s Literature ] 1st post in this series: [ Classics of Ancient History ]

This week we focus on Classic Horror Novels. We have selected the following books as recommended reading.

In 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.


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