Archives For History

 

Enter to win a copy of this new audiobook edition of Mark Noll’s classic!

 
 
We’re giving away FIVE copies of:
(Each winner will receive a code to download one copy of the audiobook from Audible.com)
 
 

Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind
Mark Noll

 
Audiobook: Eerdmans
 

Enter to win a copy of this book!

Enter now to win (It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3!) :
 
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Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

  

Reconstructing the Gospel: Finding Freedom from Slaveholder Religion

Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove

*** Watch the trailer video for this book

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

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Grounded Scholarship
and Spiritual Depth
 
A Feature Review of 
 

Reading the Bible with Rabbi Jesus:
How a Jewish Perspective Can Transform Your Understanding
 

Lois Tverberg

Hardback: Zondervan, 2018.
Buy Now: [ Amazon ] [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Michelle Wilbert
 
 
The weekly Bible study I attend in my Anglican parish church is led by a remarkable woman—a retired a pediatric hematologist specializing in childhood leukemia—who, with her late husband, also a physician, decided, in their 60’s, to return to University for advanced degrees in Religious Studies.  Since his death several years ago, his widow has continued to teach our class by deftly combining her particular interest in spirituality and the arts with his scholarship and passion for ecumenical understanding and knowledge, particularly as it pertains to the Jewish roots of Christianity.   Over the years, we have learned so much about the rich religious and cultural antecedents of our faith, indeed, we have been led to revere vigorous study of the Scriptures through the lens of Judaism.

In light of this pursuit, I found this finely crafted book, Reading the Bible with Rabbi Jesus by Lois Tverberg not only worthy of inclusion in that quest but an essential addition to any library devoted to ecumenical religious education, and to any reader interested in the deepest possible understanding of Christianity and of the first century Jewish world in which Jesus lived and carried out his ministry.   Dr. Tverberg holds a PhD in Biology and was teaching as a college professor when her fascination for biblical study was kindled by a seminar at her church. This led her to take several trips to Israel in order to study, taking courses in Biblical Hebrew, Koine Greek and in the historical and cultural context of the Bible.  She has made excellent use of her scientific education to write a book that thoughtfully—and thoroughly—interrogates the material and is outstanding in its structure and readability—it’s a truly use friendly guide for scholars and lay people alike–to understanding the Jewish history, culture and original languages of the Bible.

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Theology Tourney 2018

Enjoy some Divine Madness this month!

Brought to you by The Englewood Review of Books


 

*** VOTE for the theologians who have had (or will have)
the biggest influence on the shape of the Church…

 
64 theologians
spanning the globe and the last two millennia 

Divided into four regions. 
 
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Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

   

Seven Practices for the Church on Mission

David Fitch

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

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Tracing the Reformation’s
Unintended Legacy

A Review of

Rebel in the Ranks: Martin Luther, the Reformation, and the Conflicts That Continue to Shape Our World
Brad Gregory

Hardback: HarperOne, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Joseph Johnson

 

It’s now been five hundred years since Martin Luther sparked off the Protestant Reformation with the publication of his Ninety-Five Theses. Whether or not he actually pinned them to a church door in Wittenberg or just sent them to Archbishop Albrecht, the ensuing movement of reform and protest against aspects of Roman Catholic practices and beliefs that began with him ultimately shook the foundations of the Western church and led to both religious renewal—for both Protestants and Catholics—and sadly also centuries of strife, division, and bloodshed. To say the least, the legacy of the Reformation era that we’ve inherited is a complicated one.

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The Politics of Religious Toleration
 
A Review of 

Enlisting Faith: How the Military Chaplaincy Shaped Religion and State in Modern America
Ronit Stahl

Hardback: Harvard UP, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ] [ Kindle ]

 

Reviewed by Gregg Brekke

 

The formation of an “American religion” is an often discussed topic that generally weaves together a narrative consisting of Pilgrim religious persecution, pioneer independence, and patriotic zeal. Few, however, have sought to trace another unique aspect of religion is the United States – its peculiar and overarching pluralistic identification in modern secular society.

Ronit Stahl addresses the formation and dissemination of this association via the lens of the military chaplaincy throughout the 20th century in Enlisting Faith: How the Military Chaplaincy Shaped Religion and State in Modern America. Her argument centers on the ways in which chaplains were trained and worked to serve all soldiers, regardless of creed, instilling values in military personnel that ultimately influenced the broader culture.

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Tomorrow (Feb. 23) marks the 150th anniversary of WEB DuBois’s birth. 

DuBois was a prominent sociologist and the co-founder of the NAACP.

Here are a few books and audio resources that serve as an excellent intro to his life and work:

Autobiography
(As told to Moses Asch)

This is the extraordinary life of W.E.B. DuBois in his own words, and recorded in his own voice. The autobiographical account begins at age seventeen as DuBois left Massachusetts to attend Fisk University in 1885, and ends in the 1940s as DuBois describes his struggles with the NAACP. Each experience that DuBois shares is marked by his perception of the racial environment that encompassed it and he portrays how his identity and reactions were affected. 

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The Urban Problem of Affordability

A Review of

The Creative Destruction of New York City: Engineering the City For the Elite
Alessandro Busà

Hardcover: Oxford UP, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 

Reviewed by Thomas V. Bona

 

When I last visited my native New York City in 2013, I made sure to walk on the High Line. I was stunned at how well the vaunted 1.45-mile greenway on an abandoned rail line on the west side of Manhattan lived up to the hype. Lush vegetation – and did I hear birdsong? – stood out over oceans of urban pavement. A literal park in the sky, it had food, drinks, art installations, and excellent people watching. I never would have explored this part of the city when I was growing up in the 1980s and 1990s, when it was mostly aging industrial buildings, garages, and night clubs. Now it was teeming with life, as were a lot of other neighborhoods. With the “back to the city” trend and the strength of New York’s economy, decades of urban decay and disinvestment were beaten back. There were record numbers of residents, jobs, and tourists. What’s not to like?

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In addition to being Valentine’s Day and Ash Wednesday, today is the date attributed to the 200th anniversary of Frederick Douglass’s birth…

 
Here is Douglass’s scathing indictment of (white) American Christianity, which was published as an appendix to later editions of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
 

READ Paul Laurence Dunbar’s Poem
Frederick Douglass

 
I find, since reading over the foregoing Narrative, that I have, in several instances, spoken in such a tone and manner, respecting religion, as may possibly lead those unacquainted with my religious views to suppose me an opponent of all religion. To remove the liability of such misapprehension, I deem it proper to append the following brief explanation. What I have said respecting and against religion, I mean strictly to apply to the _slaveholding religion_ of this land, and with no possible reference to Christianity proper; for, between the Christianity of this land, and the Christianity of Christ, I recognize the widest possible difference–so wide, that to receive the one as good, pure, and holy, is of necessity to reject the other as bad, corrupt, and wicked. To be the friend of the one, is of necessity to be the enemy of the other. I love the pure, peaceable, and impartial Christianity of Christ: I therefore hate the corrupt, slaveholding, women-whipping, cradle-plundering, partial and hypocritical Christianity of this land.

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