Archives For History

 

Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

  

The Art of Reading

Damon Young

*** READ an article about this book from the Irish Times

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

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A good book is a conversation, engaging other books and ideas in conversation, and setting the stage for future conversations…

This is the first in a series of posts that explore the conversation into which a particular recent book emerges. 

(Use the comments below to let us know what you think. Is this approach to a book helpful to you?
ALSO, feel free to suggest other books that are vital to this conversation…)

 

Reconstructing the Gospel:
Finding Freedom from Slaveholder Religion

Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove

Hardback: IVP Books, 2018.
Buy Now:  [Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

Watch for our review of this book in our May 2018 magazine issue!

 

 

Wading into the Conversation

(Helpful pre-reading)

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Theology Tourney 2018
Now Down to the Excellent Eight!

Enjoy some Divine Madness this month!

Brought to you by The Englewood Review of Books

 

*** VOTE for the theologians who have had (or will have) 
the biggest influence on the shape of the Church…

 

64 of the greatest theologians have been whittled down to 8: 

Round 4 ends: March 18 – 11:55PM EST

 

The Final Four featuring the winners of all four regions
will begin on Monday March 19

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The Genesis of a Hymnal
 
A Review of 
 

Auden, the Psalms, and Me
J. Chester Johnson

Paperback: Church Publishing, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 
Reviewed by David E. Anderson

 
 

Choosing a new hymnal is controversial enough for many congregations, so consider the emotions that surround revising a centuries-old Psalter. In the late 1960s the Episcopal Church (the U.S. member of the Anglican Communion) undertook a revision of their Psalter in parallel with revising their Book of Common Prayer. Work on the Psalter, which had been used with minor tweaks since the 1500s, began around 1968 and was completed in 1971, and work on the BCP concluded in 1979.

One of the original members of the committee charged with revising the Psalter was the English poet W. H. Auden (1907–1973), whose winter home was New York City in the late 1960s. Auden was intimately familiar with the Psalms from his childhood in the north of England, but as importantly (and not noted in the book reviewed here), he had written librettos, with his partner Chester Kallman, to be set to music for composers including Benjamin Britten, Igor Stravinsky, and Hans Werner Henze.

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Enter to win a copy of this new audiobook edition of Mark Noll’s classic!

 
 
We’re giving away FIVE copies of:
(Each winner will receive a code to download one copy of the audiobook from Audible.com)
 
 

Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind
Mark Noll

 
Audiobook: Eerdmans
 

Enter to win a copy of this book!

Enter now to win (It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3!) :
 
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Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

  

Reconstructing the Gospel: Finding Freedom from Slaveholder Religion

Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove

*** Watch the trailer video for this book

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

Continue Reading…

 

Grounded Scholarship
and Spiritual Depth
 
A Feature Review of 
 

Reading the Bible with Rabbi Jesus:
How a Jewish Perspective Can Transform Your Understanding
 

Lois Tverberg

Hardback: Zondervan, 2018.
Buy Now: [ Amazon ] [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Michelle Wilbert
 
 
The weekly Bible study I attend in my Anglican parish church is led by a remarkable woman—a retired a pediatric hematologist specializing in childhood leukemia—who, with her late husband, also a physician, decided, in their 60’s, to return to University for advanced degrees in Religious Studies.  Since his death several years ago, his widow has continued to teach our class by deftly combining her particular interest in spirituality and the arts with his scholarship and passion for ecumenical understanding and knowledge, particularly as it pertains to the Jewish roots of Christianity.   Over the years, we have learned so much about the rich religious and cultural antecedents of our faith, indeed, we have been led to revere vigorous study of the Scriptures through the lens of Judaism.

In light of this pursuit, I found this finely crafted book, Reading the Bible with Rabbi Jesus by Lois Tverberg not only worthy of inclusion in that quest but an essential addition to any library devoted to ecumenical religious education, and to any reader interested in the deepest possible understanding of Christianity and of the first century Jewish world in which Jesus lived and carried out his ministry.   Dr. Tverberg holds a PhD in Biology and was teaching as a college professor when her fascination for biblical study was kindled by a seminar at her church. This led her to take several trips to Israel in order to study, taking courses in Biblical Hebrew, Koine Greek and in the historical and cultural context of the Bible.  She has made excellent use of her scientific education to write a book that thoughtfully—and thoroughly—interrogates the material and is outstanding in its structure and readability—it’s a truly use friendly guide for scholars and lay people alike–to understanding the Jewish history, culture and original languages of the Bible.

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Theology Tourney 2018

Enjoy some Divine Madness this month!

Brought to you by The Englewood Review of Books


 

*** VOTE for the theologians who have had (or will have)
the biggest influence on the shape of the Church…

 
64 theologians
spanning the globe and the last two millennia 

Divided into four regions. 
 
Continue Reading…

 

Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

   

Seven Practices for the Church on Mission

David Fitch

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

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Tracing the Reformation’s
Unintended Legacy

A Review of

Rebel in the Ranks: Martin Luther, the Reformation, and the Conflicts That Continue to Shape Our World
Brad Gregory

Hardback: HarperOne, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Joseph Johnson

 

It’s now been five hundred years since Martin Luther sparked off the Protestant Reformation with the publication of his Ninety-Five Theses. Whether or not he actually pinned them to a church door in Wittenberg or just sent them to Archbishop Albrecht, the ensuing movement of reform and protest against aspects of Roman Catholic practices and beliefs that began with him ultimately shook the foundations of the Western church and led to both religious renewal—for both Protestants and Catholics—and sadly also centuries of strife, division, and bloodshed. To say the least, the legacy of the Reformation era that we’ve inherited is a complicated one.

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