Archives For History

 

Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

 

And It Was Good: Reflections on Beginnings
(The Genesis Trilogy Book 1)

Also:

A Stone for a Pillow: Journeys with Jacob
(The Genesis Trilogy Book 2)

Sold into Egypt: Journeys into Human Being
(The Genesis Trilogy Book 3)

Madeleine L’Engle

These classics has just been released in paperback, with a new foreword by Rachel Held Evans!

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

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Yesterday (May 10th) marked the birthday of theologian Karl Barth!

In honor of the occasion we offer the following rare video clips of him discussing theology…

*** Books by Karl Barth ***

 
 

1 – On the Confessing Church

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Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

  

Becoming Curious: A Spiritual Practice of Asking Questions

Casey Tygrett

Watch the book trailer video… 

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One of this week’s best new book releases is:
 

Mother Tongue: How Our Heritage Shapes Our Story
Leonard Sweet

Hardback: NavPress, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]   [ Kindle ]
 
 
 

READ AN EXCERPT 
via Google Books

 
 

Here is a snippet from an interview I did with Leonard Sweet for RELEVANT magazine

( Will appear in the May/June 2017 issue )
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Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

   

Mother Tongue: How Our Heritage Shapes Our Story

Leonard Sweet

Read a review from Hearts and Minds Books

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

Continue Reading…

 

Holy People

 
A Feature Review of 

The Saints:
A Short History

Simon Yarrow

Hardback: Oxford UP, 2016
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
 
Reviewed by Nick Jordan
 
 
 
Simon Yarrow is a historian of medieval religion at the University of Birmingham. His first book, Saints and Their Communities: Miracle Stories in Twelfth-century England, was a reworking of his Oxford dissertation, and he continues to focus on related research areas. The Saints: A Short History is exactly what its title says it is, no dumbed-down version of the larger book, but a well-written and concise survey of the meaning of sainthood in Christian history.

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An Immense Pride in American Food
 
A Feature Review of 
 

Eight Flavors: The Untold Story of American Cuisine
Sarah Lohman

Hardback: Simon and Schuster, 2016
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]   [ Kindle ]
 
 
Reviewed by Andrew Camp
 
 
American cuisine and eating habits are a fascinating subject to me, having worked as a professional chef. We are a nation of immigrants and transplants. Our economic class structure also plays a role in American cuisine. Food deserts in lower income areas have been lamented by many, while middle and upper class people enjoy the bounty of beautiful farmer’s markets year-round.

Because of this, there are widely disparate views on eating and food habits. It seems that every week the newest and surely the greatest diet is being sold on the evening news, which many of us watch while eating a highly-processed dinner. Michael Pollan voiced this very concern in his seminal book The Omnivore’s Dilemma:

Consuming these neo-pseudo-foods alone in our cars, we have become a nation of antinomian eaters, each of us struggling to work out our dietary salvation on our own. Is it any wonder Americans suffer from so many eating disorders? In the absence of any lasting consensus about what and how and where and when to eat, the omnivore’s dilemma has returned to America with an almost atavistic force (301).

While this seems to be the case, is there anything that unites American cuisine? Sarah Lohman, author of the new book, Eight Flavors: The Untold Story of American Cuisine, wondered the same thing. She recognized the extremely diverse culinary traditions of America, but then pondered, “If I look past these differences, I wondered what united America’s culinary culture?” (xv).

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Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

  

Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy

Anne Lamott

Read an excerpt from this book

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

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Men of Their Times and Places
 
A Feature Review of
 

Empire Baptized:
How the Church Embraced What Jesus Rejected
Wes Howard-Brook

Paperback: Orbis, 2016.
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]   [ Kindle ]

 
 
Reviewed by Alden Bass
 
 
In his 1988 Louis H. Jordan Lectures, later published as Drudgery Divine, Jonathan Z. Smith argued that studies of early Christianity were hopelessly mired in confessional apologetics. Narrowing in on the study of Hellenistic Mystery Religions, he observed that Protestants were eager to critique the pagan rites, believing the “pure” religion of Paul to have been corrupted by Romish pomp and ritual. Likewise, Unitarian and Rationalist scholars, in an attempt to get at the Protestants, fingered Paul for introducing “Hellenism” into the rustic parables of Jesus. The Catholics defended all of it.

To Smith’s account we could add “radical” Christian treatments of early Christianity which have multiplied in recent years. Alistair Sykes, Andy Alexis-Baker, Alan Kreider, Everett Ferguson (to name a few) have described an early Christianity which looks an awfully lot like ana/baptist communities: nonviolent ethic, gathered-church ecclesiology, believers’ baptism, and (for Ferguson) acapella congregational singing. These scholars are not inventing things, but they are calling attention to areas neglected by earlier scholars, in the process revising the story of the earliest Christians to embrace their own traditions.

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Rippling Through History

 
A Review of 

All Things Made New:
The Reformation and Its Legacy

Diarmaid MacCulloch

Hardback: New York: Oxford UP, 2016
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Seth Moland-Kavash
 

Diarmaid MacCulloch is Professor of the History of the Church at Oxford University and one of the most well-regarded and prolifically published church historians of our era. This newly published volume is a collection of essays, all previously published in various venues over the past 25 years, that reflect MacCulloch’s reflections on the Reformation and its ongoing legacy in England, in Europe, in the West, and throughout the world.

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