Archives For History

 

Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

    

Flee, Be Silent, Pray: Ancient Prayers for Anxious Christians 

Ed Cyzewski

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The Capacity to Change
 
A Brief Review of

The King and the Catholics:
England, Ireland, and the Fight for Religious Freedom, 1780–1829
Antonia Fraser

Hardback: Doubleday, 2018
Buy Now:
Amazon ]  [ Kindle ] [ Audible ]

 
Reviewed by David E. Anderson
 
 
Fans of Antonia Fraser, the well-regarded surveyor of the British (The Wives of Henry VIII) and French monarchies (Marie Antoinette: The Journey) as well as a popular novelist (the “Jemima Shore” novels), will find much to enjoy in this history of Catholic emancipation in Great Britain in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

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One of this week’s
best new book releases!

 

*** Read our review of this excellent book

 
 
We’re giving away FIVE copies
of this excellent new book:
 

The Color of Compromise: 
The Truth about
the American Church’s Complicity
in Racism

Jemar Tisby

Hardback: Zondervan, 2019.
 
 
Enter now to win a copy of this book (It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3!) :
 
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Confronted and Grieved
by the Sins of our Past.

A Feature Review of

The Color of Compromise:
The Truth about the American Church’s Complicity in Racism
Jemar Tisby

Hardback: Zondervan, 2019.
Buy Now:
Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]  [ Audible ]
[ 20% off retail – Hearts & Minds ]

Reviewed by Dorothy Littell Greco.
 
Writer, speaker, and historian (PhD Candidate, University of Mississippi) Jemar Tisby has created an authoritative masterpiece. The Color of Compromise relies on history as “the main vehicle to take us on a journey toward greater racial understanding.” And what a journey Tisby takes us on.

The author topples multiple sacred cows as he dismantles the prevailing textbook narrative that nearly deifies both the early European settlers as well as the men who wrote the Constitution. Yes, the document was vital for our nation, but it also legalized systemic racism—and misogyny. Had the Founding Fathers actually been willing to “establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defencefor everyone (as written in the preamble for the US Constitution), the history of the United States would have been radically different.

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Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

   

The Color of Compromise: The Truth about the American Church’s Complicity in Racism 

Jemar Tisby

*** READ a five-star review from Christianity Today

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

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Great book for under a buck!!!
 

In God’s Holy Light:
Wisdom from the Desert Monastics

 

Sr. Joan Chittister

 

*** 99c ***

PLUS, Buy the Ebook, and get
the Audiobook for only $7.49!!!

 
 
“This book raises a weighty question: whether spirituality really has anything to do with modern life in a pluralistic world. Joan Chittister—eminently qualified to do so—answers with a resounding “Yes!” Well reasoned and powerfully convincing.”
—Brother David Steindl-Rast

Buy Now ]

 

Cromwell, the Reformation, and Anglican Identity
 
A Review of

Thomas Cromwell:
A Revolutionary Life

Diarmaid MacCulloch

 
Hardback: Viking, 2018
Buy Now:
Amazon ] [ Kindle ] [ Audible
 
Reviewed by Joseph Johnson
 
 
Thomas Cromwell’s administrative prowess, enigmatic personality, and the striking nature of his rise and fall provide rich material for both fans of Hilary Mantel’s novels and aspiring historians wanting to sink their teeth into the fraught world of 16th century Tudor England. For these audiences, I think Diarmaid MacCulloch’s Thomas Cromwell: A Revolutionary Life may become one of their more long-lasting guides and conversation partners. MacCulloch possesses impressive credentials as a religious historian of the English Reformation in particular and Christianity more generally, so from one perspective, it’s interesting to see him take on a biography of Cromwell, who is sometimes viewed as a coldly calculating, rather Machiavellian secular figure (4). One of MacCulloch’s aims in this work, though, is to subvert this estimation of Cromwell and show how his religious and political motivations were intertwined (4, 371).

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The Story of Carols

A Meditation for the Advent and Christmas seasons
 
By Tim Dowley,

Author of 

Christian Music:
A Global History

Tim Dowley

Paperback: SPCK, 2018
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]

 

Christmas Music for Those
Who Don’t like Christmas Music

 

*** All The Holiday Music
You Will Ever Need!

Carols fall into that category of things that people either love or loathe. Many warm to their traditional imagery and annual memories of Christmases past; others do their utmost to avoid them, associating carols with sentimental words and mawkish music.

Carols are normally narrative, contemplative or celebratory in content, often with a simple, straightforward sentiment and in strophic form. Most of the surviving medieval carols were written for the professional cathedral singers of Europe. Among the oldest is ‘Puer natus in Bethlehem’ (‘A Boy is Born in Bethlehem’), dating from the thirteenth century. Though the majority of carols were for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, others were for Holy Innocents’ Day, Epiphany and Twelfth Night  – for instance, the ‘numeral’ carol ‘The Twelve Days of Christmas’, which appears in England from the eighteenth century onwards. The carol ‘The Seven Joys of Mary’, which appears with many variants in the UK and the USA, grew out of pre-Reformation devotion to the Virgin and has survived for centuries in vernacular devotional verses in the folk tradition. The carol ‘I Saw Three Ships Come Sailing In’, for which the earliest known printed text dates from 1666, possibly derives from European folk memory of the supposed journeyings of relics of the Magi, the ‘Three Kings of Cologne’.

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Misappropriating Bonhoeffer
 
A Feature Review of
 

The Battle for Bonhoeffer:
Debating Discipleship in the Age of Trump

Stephen Haynes

Paperback: Eerdmans, 2018.
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Audible ]

 
Reviewed by James Dekker

 
 
The ten chapters and postscript “Open Letter to Christians Who Love Bonhoeffer but (Still) Support Trump” of Stephen Haynes’s Battle for Bonhoeffer are some of the densest I’ve ever read outside of graduate theses, but it is far more engaging than any thesis. Dense is by no means bad. Battle is carefully organized, clearly written and always compelling. And well it should be, since this closely-argued discursus explores possibly the most incandescent questions in American Christians’ conversation since the Vietnam War: “Why and how has Dietrich Bonhoeffer become a hero to evangelicals in the first twenty years of the 21st century, when for decades after his death his theology was widely suspect outside mainline Protestantism? Why do so many evangelicals support Donald Trump?” Such rocky geography covers the American evangelical battleground that Stephen Haynes attempts to delimit.

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In Our Advent 2018 magazine issue,
( shipping soon, are you a subscriber? )

we feature a review of this superb new biography:
 

Then They Came for Me:
Martin Niemöller, the Pastor Who Defied the Nazis
Matthew Hockenos

Hardback: Basic Books, 2018
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 
 
Since our reviewer for this book, Laura M. Fabrycky, lives in Berlin,
We asked her to take some photos of crucial landmarks from Martin Niemöller’s life…

 

First, a snippet of Laura’s review:

Encountering this man with “an imperfect moral compass” allows us to re-examine our own moral imaginations: how we fashion heroes for ourselves, and how easily we lose their human story—and arguably, aspects of our own—in our quest to make them heroes. The book’s subtitle trumpets Niemöller as “the pastor who defied the Nazis”—and he did, at least enough so to merit their persecution. But his defiance was not, nor could be, salvific. His triumphs were as humanly finite and morally tangled as he was—as we are. Our persistent hunger for glittering images prevents us from seeing how we, ordinary mortals with blind spots, with capacities for grave complicity and banal evil, must make our way in a complicated world. Like Niemöller, we also have no alibi.

 

St. Anne’s Church,
Berlin-Dahlem
(Photo 1 of 10 )

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