Archives For Historical Fiction

 

The Wake Up CallThe Wake Up Call –
7 December 2012

Like the smell of strong coffee wafting down the hall, we offer a few book-related thoughts and stories to jumpstart your day…

*** Receive an email with The Wake Up Call (and daily ERB posts) in your inbox each morning! Sign up for The Daily Book Morsel


Today is the Feast of Saint Ambrose (c.330-397)!
Read Alban Butler’s classic account of Ambrose’s life from LIVES OF THE SAINTS…
DOWNLOAD a free ebook version of LIVES OF THE SAINTS!

“What was any art but a mould in which to imprison for a moment the shining elusive element which is life itself – life hurrying past us and running away, too strong to stop, too sweet to lose.”  – Novelist Willa Cather, born on this day in 1873.

*** [easyazon-link keywords=”Willa Cather” locale=”us”]Books by Willa Cather[/easyazon-link]

Book News:

Thanks be to God for this new day, may it be full of beauty and grace!

The Wake Up Call image via WikiMedia Commons

 

Continue Reading…

 

“A Window Into the Human Condition

A Review of
The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson:
A Novel
.

Jerome Charyn.

Reviewed by
Mark Traphagen
( FoolishSage.com ).


The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson:
A Novel
.

Jerome Charyn.
Hardback: Norton, 2010.
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]

Secret Life of  Emily DickinsonHistorical fiction is a daring enterprise, which is a polite way of saying that it borders on the foolhardy at one extreme and the arrogant at the other. If attempting to recreate a time and place neither author nor reader can visit to verify smacks of foolhardy hubris, then fictionalized autobiography might be something worse. However, after reading The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson, the reader is glad author Jerome Charyn risked something worse to achieve something better: an engaging, intriguing, dreamscape creation of an Emily Dickinson who, if not the one who actually existed, leads a “secret life” we would wish for the reclusive bard of Amherst.

Emily Dickinson does not seem like the most fertile ground for novelization. Aside from the words of poetry she left us, she is best known for hiding out in her bedroom for decades, communicating with others only by notes or from behind a partially-opened door. Charyn seemed to want to pursue the question “how could someone who barely ever left her room write so convincingly and sensuously about the world?” Charyn’s answer is to hypothesize that shy Emily may have been more the adventuress than we have known.

Continue Reading…