Archives For Heaven

 

Scot McKnight has a new book out on the topic of Heaven…

 

The Heaven Promise:
Engaging The Bible’s Truth About Life to Come

Scot McKnight

Hardback: WaterBrook, 2015
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
 
Last week, Scot did a webcast in which he introduced the book and took live questions from listeners about heaven.
 
You can watch the recording of that webcast here…
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Elevating the Mystery of Faith

A Feature Review of

Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory: Rethinking the Things That Matter Most
Jerry Walls

Paperback: Brazos Press, 2015
Buy now:  [ Amazon]  [ Kindle ]

 

Reviewed by Andrew Stout

 

I must admit to being suspicious of much of the writing that gets labeled as “apologetics.” Too often these works do not take objections to the Christian faith seriously enough, represent dissenting position accurately enough, or adequately acknowledge the deep mysteries that accompany any serious inquiry into religious questions. More often than not, apologetics requires a fundamental reorientation to the world rather than a tit for tat exchange of objections and responses. John Milbank has claimed that the problem with much modern apologetics is the fact that it naively concedes ground to a purely secular rationale, stating that “any successful exercise of apologetics…must contain a strong confessional element which convinces precisely because it persuades through the force of an imaginative presentation of belief.”(Imaginative Apologetics, xiv).

 

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“Rumors of Rob Bell’s Heretical Universalism
Have Been Greatly Exaggerated

A review of

Love Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell,
and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived
.
By Rob Bell.

Review by Adam Ellis.


LOVE WINS - Rob BellLove Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived.
Rob Bell.
Hardback: HarperOne, 2011.
Buy now: [ Amazon – Hardback ]
[ Amazon – Kindle ]

The fact that Rob Bell’s new book is considered controversial is as much a testimony to the marketing prowess of HarperOne (not to mention the unintentional marketing prowess of some critics), as it is to any theology contained in the book.  The first lesson that can be derived from all of this is that if you want to publish a successful book, HarperOne isn’t a bad way to go.

To begin with, let’s look at two things that shouldn’t be surprises, but (based on the more angry reviews I’ve read) apparently are:

  1. Rob Bell is not a Calvinist (“New”, “Neo”, or otherwise).  He doesn’t write like one.  He doesn’t adhere to exclusively Calvinist doctrine.  He doesn’t see the terms “non-Calvinist” and “Christian” as mutually exclusive.
  2. Rob Bell writes almost exactly like he talks.  That means that there will be

words

      and half-sentences

            laid-out unconventionally

                  throughout

                        the

                              book.

Continue Reading…

 

Faith And Trust

Liberty Hyde Bailey

Editor’s note: I re-encountered this poem earlier this week, and was struck by how poignant a response it held to all the recent controversy about Rob Bell’s new book Love Wins. Or, at least this is how I feel about it…

Two workmen true as I passed by
Announced what things beyond us lie,—
Two views that never can agree
Yet each one knew just what will be.
Of present days they were not sure
But each man’s future was secure,
For faith had set them both to know
Precisely how our destins flow.

But only this and this I know,—
That I am here and then I go.
I pass my work with hope and zest
And live my time as it seems best;
I live it full and drain it deep,—
’Tis well to live, ’tis vain to weep.
If there be things I cannot tell
The more I trust that all is well.
I take the cheer from daily lot
And for the rest I vex me not,
For what there is beyond the sod
I leave it all to Time and God.

— from Bailey’s collection of poems, Wind and Weather
(Doulos Christou Press reprint edition 2008)
Read the Book’s introduction here

Faith And Trust

Two workmen true as I passed by

Announced what things beyond us lie,

Two views that never can agree

Yet each one knew just what will be.

Of present days they were not sure

But each man’s future was secure,

For faith had set them both to know

Precisely how our destins flow.

But only this and this I know,

That I am here and then I go.

I pass my work with hope and zest

And live my time as it seems best;

I live it full and drain it deep,

Tis well to live, ’tis vain to weep.

If there be things I cannot tell

The more I trust that all is well.

I take the cheer from daily lot

And for the rest I vex me not,

For what there is beyond the sod

I leave it all to Time and God.