Archives For Happiness

 

Economics as if People Mattered

A Review of

The Wound and the Blessing: Economics, Relationships, and Happiness

Luigino Bruni

Paperback: New City, 2012.
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Reviewed by Joe Davis

 

Has anyone ever told you, in a harsh, menacing tone: “I mean business”? We use this phrase to remind, or rather warn, others of our serious resolve towards the completion of a goal at any expense we deem necessary, especially our relationships with others. If people “mean business,” they are obsessed by a single-minded pursuit of their objective and it is best not to stand in their way. Consider also the common saying, “Its just business.” We use this phrase when we want to communicate a certain sense of apathy towards an interpersonal relationship. Continue Reading…

 

C.D.C. Reeve - Action, Contemplation, HappinessQuestioning the Divide between Contemplation and Action

A Review of

Action, Contemplation, and Happiness: An Essay on Aristotle

C.D.C. Reeve

Hardback: Harvard UP, 2012.
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Reviewed by Daniel Greeson.

Professor C.D.C. Reeve is the Delta Kappa Epsilon Distinguished Professor at the University of North Carolina and is one of the preeminent contemporary interpreters of ancient Greek philosophy. He has not only published new and updated translations of Plato and Aristotle but has also contributed many important interpretative works that continue to break new light upon well-trod texts essential to the western intellectual tradition. His most recent contribution, Action, Contemplation, and Happiness: An Essay on Aristotle, is a welcome addition to his already burgeoning corpus.

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Jane Kenyon was born on this day in 1947…

She died tragically of leukemia at the age of 47.

This poem is found in the wonderful collection

Dancing with Joy: 99 Poems.
Roger Housdon, Editor.
Hardback: Harmony, 2007.
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THE HAPPY MAN
G.K. Chesterton

To teach the grey earth like a child,
To bid the heavens repent,
I only ask from Fate the gift
Of one man well content.

Him will I find: though when in vain
I search the feast and mart,
The fading flowers of liberty,
The painted masks of art.

I only find him at the last,
On one old hill where nod
Golgotha’s ghastly trinity–
Three persons and one god.