Archives For Feminist

 

Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

See a book here that you’d like to review for us?
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Jesus Feminist: An Invitation to Revisit the Bible’s View of Women
By Sarah Bessey

Read a review from Religion News  Service

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The Signature to a Life

A Feature Review of

Later Poems Selected and New: 1971-2012

Adrienne Rich

Hardback: Norton, 2012.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ] [ Kindle ]

Reviewed by Cynthia R. Wallace

 

Adrienne Rich is familiar to many through widely anthologized poetry and her book Of Woman Born: Motherhood as Experience and Institution (1976). Though the 1951 Yale Younger Poets Award marked her early success in the established tradition, her more experimental work of the late ‘60s and ‘70s, the era of Rich’s coming-out as a radical feminist and lesbian, is the poetry around which her reputation crystallized. But Rich wrote and published, steadily, for three full decades after those heady years. Later Poems Selected and New: 1971-2012 offers a correction to those who judge the poet – for better or worse – only by the first half of her career. Its 544 pages include selections from volumes published between 1971 and 2010, chosen by the writer before her death in March 2012, as well as ten previously uncollected poems written in 2010-2011.

 

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Julia Spicher Kasdorf - Poetry in AmericaReflecting on Nostalgia, Loss, and Flight

A Featured Review of

Poetry in America

Julia Spicher Kasdorf

Paperback: U of Pittsburgh Press, 2011.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]

Reviewed By Alex Dye.

There is a universal longing, a part of the human condition, which causes one to reflect on and desire for the past.  Whether a Christmas in which all of the siblings, uncles, and cousins attended and nobody was belligerently drunk, or that great Sunday afternoon movie spent in pajamas on the couch.  We enjoy remembering our families, for better or for worse, and those influences which helped to shape us.   And yet along with that nostalgia is a natural sense of loss, moments that cannot be recaptured or changed.  In Poetry in America, author Julia Spicher Kasdorf writes on the paradoxical longing and loss by interweaving stories of the past and present with self -reflections on her person as an author, artist, mother, and woman.

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