Archives For Fasting

 

The Season of Lent is a time on the Church’s Calendar when we through prayer and fasting reflect upon our desires and submit ourselves to the transforming power of God.

Here are six recent books — one for each week of Lent — that reflect the Lenten spirit or that challenge us to take a deeper look at the seasons of the Christian year.


Fasting
(Ancient Practices Series)

by Scot McKnight.
Thomas Nelson, 2009.
[ Our Review ] [ Buy the Book ]

——

Seasons of Celebration:
Meditations on the Cycle of Liturgical Feasts
.
By Thomas Merton.
Ave Maria Press, 2009.
[ Our Review ] [ Buy the Book ]


Being Consumed:
Economics and Christian Desire

by Bill Cavanuagh.
Eerdmans, 2008.
[ Our Review ] [ Buy the Book ]

—–

The Liturgical Year
(Ancient Practices Series)

By Joan Chittister
Thomas Nelson, 2009.
[ Our Review ] [ Buy the Book ]


Enough: Contentment in An Age of Excess.
By Will Samson.
David C. Cook, 2009.

[ Our Review ] [ Buy the Book ]
—–
Living the Christian Year:
Time to Inhabit the Story of God
.
By Bobby Gross.
IVP Books, 2007.
[ Our Review ] [ Buy the Book ]

 

  1. While you wait for the Intrvw w/ @ScotMcKnight Our revws of his 2 most recent bks BLUE PARAKEET http://tr.im/o1er /FASTING http://tr.im/o1fa12:00 PM Jun 10th from web
  2. Welcome to the Englewood Review twinterview with Scot McKnight ( @ScotMcKnight ), professor, blogger, and author of many books…12:00 PM Jun 10th from web
  3. We are talking today with Scot about his newest book FASTING ( @ThomasNelson 2009 ) Welcome Scot!12:01 PM Jun 10th from web
  4. @scotmcknight I know from experience that fasting is difficult for most people. So, why should we even pick up your book?12:01 PM Jun 10th from web
  5. @ERBks I’m hoping this book will shed some light on the abuses of fasting and the misunderstandings that have slipped in.12:03 PM Jun 10th from web in reply to ERBks
  6. Fasting, I believe, is natural and inevitable. When it becomes a chore or difficult something’s gone wrong.12:04 PM Jun 10th from web    Continue Reading…

 


Tomorrow, June 10 beginning at 12PM ET, The Englewood Review of Books will engage Scot McKnight in a Twitter conversation about his recent book FASTING, which is part of Thomas Nelson’s “Ancient Practices” series, edited by Phyllis Tickle.

In order to follow this twinterview live, you will need follow both:
@ERBks and @ScotMcKnight

I will kick off the twinterview at 12 PM ET on June 10, and having a set number of questions, the interview will continue until all the questions are answered.

If you don’t use twitter, the interview will eventually be published on the ERB website.

Help us spread the word:

You won’t want to miss this special event!!!

Other upcoming twinterviews:

Monday June 15: David Dark ( @DavidDark )
on his book, The Sacredness of Questioning Everything.
Monday June 22: Will Samson ( @WASamson )
on his book, Enough: Contentment in An Age of Excess

AND WATCH FOR MORE TWINTERVIEWS THIS SUMMER ON @ERBKS !!!

 


On June 10, The Englewood Review of Books will engage Scot McKnight in a Twitter conversation about his recent book FASTING, which is part of Thomas Nelson’s “Ancient Practices” series, edited by Phyllis Tickle.

In order to follow this twinterview live, you will need follow both:
@ERBks and @ScotMcKnight

I will kick off the twinterview on the morning of June 10, and having a set number of questions, the interview will continue until all the questions are answered.

If you don’t use twitter, the interview will eventually be published on the ERB website.

Help us spread the word:

You won’t want to miss this special event!!!

AND WATCH FOR MORE TWINTERVIEWS THIS SUMMER ON @ERBKS !!!

 

“Embodying Our Grief

A Review of
Fasting.
by
Scot McKnight.

 

By Chris Smith.

 

Fasting (Ancient Practices Series).
Scot McKnight.
Hardcover: Thomas Nelson, 2009.

Buy now from:
[ Doulos Christou Books $15] [ Amazon ]

 

Just in time for the season of Lent, which starts on Ash Wednesday (this year February 25), Thomas Nelson has just released the newest book in its “Ancient Practices” series: Fasting by Scot McKnight.  This volume offers both a deeply rooted theological case for fasting and a firm caution against the dangers that fasting poses to one’s health, if done excessively or without an understanding of how the human body works.

            Here at Englewood Christian Church, the only practice we have of fasting is to fast during the day on Good Friday, a fast which we promptly defame with our gigantic potluck dinner that follows our evening prayer service.  I’ve tried fasting on my own a few times, particularly on retreats, but to paraphrase G.K. Chesterton, fasting is a practice that I’ve found difficult and therefore one that I’ve pretty much left untried.  I recognize the biblical and historical significance of fasting, but have never really been part of a church community that valued fasting as a significant practice.

            It seems to me that at least part of our hesitancy toward fasting here at Englewood is the ways that we’ve seen fasting being done in theologically appalling ways.  At the book’s outset, McKnight names one such erroneous and detrimental way that fasting is practiced, to which he will frequently return over the course of the book: viz., fasting in order to produce results.  Such a practice of fasting, which McKnight calls an instrumental view of fasting, is not a healthy spiritual discipline, but rather a “manipulative device.”  McKnight argues instead that fasting is a responsive practice, saying that fasting is a body’s natural response to grief.   He does not deny that sometimes results do come from fasting, but he is adamant that for the people of God, the why of fasting should be a response to grief and not a means to an end – however good that end might seem.  McKnight is also careful to point out that avoiding chocolate, coffee, television or some other enjoyable habit for Lent can be helpful as a sort of abstinence, but should not be called fasting.

 

Continue Reading…