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This Saturday (Oct 20) is the birthday of philosopher and educator, John Dewey.

In honor of the occasion, we offer this excerpt from his helpful book:

How We Think
John Dewey

D.C. Heath, 1910.
*** FREE Ebook:
Kindle ] [ Various Formats – Project Gutenberg ]

 
 

WHAT IS THOUGHT?

§ 1. Varied Senses of the Term

 
Four senses of thought, from the wider to the limited

No words are oftener on our lips than thinking and thought. So profuse and varied, indeed, is our use of these words that it is not easy to define just what we mean by them. The aim of this chapter is to find a single consistent meaning. Assistance may be had by considering some typical ways in which the terms are employed. In the first place thought is used broadly, not to say loosely. Everything that comes to mind, that “goes through our heads,” is called a thought. To think of a thing is just to be conscious of it in any way whatsoever. Second, the term is restricted by excluding whatever is directly presented; we think (or think of) only such things as we do not directly see, hear, smell, or taste. Then, third, the meaning is further limited to beliefs that rest upon some kind of evidence or testimony. Of this third type, two kinds—or, rather, two degrees—must be discriminated. In some cases, a belief is accepted with slight or almost no attempt to state the grounds that support it. In other cases, the ground or basis for a belief is deliberately sought and its adequacy to support the belief examined. This process is called reflective thought; it alone is truly educative in value, and it forms, accordingly, the principal subject of this volume. We shall now briefly describe each of the four senses.
 
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This new biography of Fred Rogers is one of 
this week’s best new book releases!
 

The Good Neighbor:
The Life and Work of Fred Rogers
Maxwell King

Hardback: Abrams, 2018.
Buy Now:
Amazon ] [ Kindle ]  [ Audible ]
 

Listen to an interview that
Maxwell King did with NPR station WNPR

 

Read an excerpt of the book,
the story of Fred Rogers’s appearance
on The Oprah Winfrey Show:

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I recently read this brief ebook, and appreciated the critical questions it posed:
 

Pooping Elephants, Mowing Weeds:
What Business Gurus Failed to Tell You

David George Moore

Ebook: Self-published, 2018
Buy Now: [ Kindle ]

 

How to Evaluate Business Books

An Excerpt 
(Reprinted with Permission of the Author)

 

Here are some diagnostic questions which should aid in deciphering the merits of any business book:

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Dallas Willard’s unfinished masterpiece, was finished after his death by three of his students and is being published later this month.
 

The Disappearance
of Moral Knowledge

Dallas Willard
(Edited and Completed by Steven Porter, Aaron Preston, and Gregg Ten Elshof)

Hardback: Routledge, June 2018
Buy Now: [ Amazon

 

This is a very expensive academic book (if you’re interested in it and cannot afford a copy, maybe your local public or university library can purchase a copy).

The publisher has graciously released a 99-page excerpt from the book to give readers a substantial taste for the book’s contents.
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This distinctive new book is both a poignant and funny teaching memoir, 
and a keen reading of William Shakespeare’s play ROMEO AND JULIET:
 

The Teacher Diaries:
Romeo & Juliet

Callie Feyen

Paperback: TS Poetry Press, 2018
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
 
 

An excerpt from this book:

 
It’s easy to wince when reading the Nurse’s debut scene. In fewer than fifty lines, we learn of her daughter’s death, and she shares the very palpable details of how she weaned Juliet, as well as her body’s reaction to that weaning. We learn that her husband is also gone, and we hear a little anecdote about Juliet’s toddler years. After my first reading of the Nurse’s speech, I wrote in the margin, “Girlfriend could’ve started a blog.”

Shakespeare’s Nurse is off-color, and she gives far more information than she needs to. She is also the person Juliet trusts most. When I teach Romeo and Juliet and we get to this part in the play, before we read, I give my students a warning.

“She says way too much, and she might make you squirm a bit.”

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In addition to being Valentine’s Day and Ash Wednesday, today is the date attributed to the 200th anniversary of Frederick Douglass’s birth…

 
Here is Douglass’s scathing indictment of (white) American Christianity, which was published as an appendix to later editions of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
 

READ Paul Laurence Dunbar’s Poem
Frederick Douglass

 
I find, since reading over the foregoing Narrative, that I have, in several instances, spoken in such a tone and manner, respecting religion, as may possibly lead those unacquainted with my religious views to suppose me an opponent of all religion. To remove the liability of such misapprehension, I deem it proper to append the following brief explanation. What I have said respecting and against religion, I mean strictly to apply to the _slaveholding religion_ of this land, and with no possible reference to Christianity proper; for, between the Christianity of this land, and the Christianity of Christ, I recognize the widest possible difference–so wide, that to receive the one as good, pure, and holy, is of necessity to reject the other as bad, corrupt, and wicked. To be the friend of the one, is of necessity to be the enemy of the other. I love the pure, peaceable, and impartial Christianity of Christ: I therefore hate the corrupt, slaveholding, women-whipping, cradle-plundering, partial and hypocritical Christianity of this land.

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Today is the release day for John Green’s new novel…

Turtles All the Way Down
John Green

Hardback: Dutton Books, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 

Listen to John Green reading the
first chapter from this new book… 

 
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I recently finished reviewing this superb new book for our fall print magazine issue. 
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ACTS: Belief Commentary Series
A Theological Commentary on the Bible

Willie James Jennings

 
Hardback: WJK Books, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
 
I’m excited to share the following excerpt from this book with you, which I take as one of Jennings’s central (and most timely) themes in this commentary. 
 

Reprinted from Acts: A Theological Commentary on the Bible
by Willie James Jennings.
Used by permission of Westminster John Knox Press. All rights reserved.

 

Word of God against Word of God.
A Reflection on the Story of
Peter in the House of Cornelius
Acts 10-11

(Pages 118-121)

 

“You have heard that it was said, . . . but I say to you . . .” (Matt. 5). These often repeated words of Jesus set the stage for our interaction with the living God, whose words to us are living, because they are bound up with the source and giver of life itself. Acts 11 is a moment of reorientation where the Spirit is teaching us a crucial lesson that the church must constantly remember: God yet speaks and word of God always presses against word of God. What God has said in the past is pressed against by what God is saying now. Israel shows us that the human creature is always positioned between these two words and destined for yet more hearing from a God ever extended in grace toward us. This in-between position  has often been painful for us as we try to grasp clarity of thought and action on a walk of obedience to God on a well-lit path, albeit with multiple twists and turns. (Ps. 119:105) In this regard, the struggle of the church has been twofold: we struggle to hear the new word that God is constantly speaking, and we struggle to see the link between the new word and the word previously spoken.

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This excellent book was recently released…
 
 

Living Sustainably: What Intentional Communities Can Teach Us about Democracy, Simplicity, and Nonviolence
A. Whitney Sanford

Hardback: UP of Kentucky, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
 
 

Read the Introduction to the book…

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Yesterday marked the 200th anniversary of the birth of Henry David Thoreau.

Although best known for his books Walden and Civil Disobedience, one of Thoreau’s most poignant works for our fast-paced world is his treatise on walking.

 

Here are five of the most relevant and compelling passages from this work:

Download the full text for FREE:
   [ Kindle ]  [ Project Gutenberg

 

1) To Walk is to Saunter

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