Archives For Eugene Peterson

 

Eugene_Peterson

Sunday (Nov. 6) marks the birthday of acclaimed pastor and writer, Eugene Peterson…

In honor of the occasion, we offer a series of our favorite brief video clips featuring Eugene Peterson

*** Books by Eugene Peterson

Conversation with Bono on the Psalms:

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Here are 5 essential ebooks on sale now that are worth checking out:
( Ann Voskamp, Michael Pollan, Eugene Peterson, MORE)

Via our sister website Thrifty Christian Reader
To keep up with all the latest ebook deals,
be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook

  

One Thousand Gifts: A Dare to Live Fully Right Where You Are

Ann Voskamp

*** $2.99 ***

NEXT EBOOK >>>>>

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Without work, all life goes rotten. But when work is soulless, life stifles and dies.
– Albert Camus,
born on this date, 1913
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Poem of the Day:
“Lucky Peacemakers”
by Eugene Peterson
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*** 3 Poems from Eugene Peterson’s collection HOLY LUCK.

 

Kindle Ebook Deal of the Day:
Love in the Ruins: A Novel
by Walker Percy
Only $1.99!!!
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*** NOTE: This stated price is for the United States. Unfortunately, this offer may or may not be available in other countries. Sorry!

 
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The Wake Up Call – November 7, 2014

 

Eugene Peterson

This is a new weekly feature where we highlight 3 poems from a recent collection of poetry.
Since today is Eugene Peterson’s birthday, we are featuring his recent volume of poems.

If you struggle to read poetry, I recommend checking out this little essay I wrote on why poetry is important.

“Like a rich and carefully crafted dessert, one must savor a poem in order to enjoy it fully—its images, its context, its sounds. A good poem is hospitable, inviting us to sit for awhile and enter into a conversation. Poetry, however, does not come naturally for us in our times; it is a discipline to which we must commit ourselves.”

This week’s collection of poems is:

Holy Luck: Poems

Eugene Peterson

Paperback: Eerdmans, 2013
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Holy Luck ]

Poem #1: The Lucky Poor

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It is not easy to convey a sense of wonder, let alone resurrection wonder, to another. It’s the very nature of wonder to catch us off guard, to circumvent expectations and assumptions. Wonder can’t be packaged, and it can’t be worked up. It requires some sense of being there and some sense of engagement.”
―Eugene H. Peterson,
born on this date, 1932

 
Poem of the Day:
“Falling Leaves and Early Snow”
By Kenneth Rexroth

 

Kindle Ebook Deal of the Day:
Everyday Justice: The Global Impact of our Daily Choices
Julie Clawson
Only $2.99!!!
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*** NOTE: This stated price is for the United States. Unfortunately, this offer may or may not be available in other countries. Sorry!

 
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The Wake Up Call – November 6, 2014

 

Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

See a book here that you’d like to review for us?
Contact us, and we’ll talk about the possibility of a review.

> > > >
Next Book

This Day: New and Collected Sabbath Poems 1979 – 2012
By Wendell Berry

*** Other Books by Wendell Berry

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In our continuing effort to fund the work of The Englewood Review, we offer you the opportunity to buy bargain theology books from CBD that we think of are interest.

Buying books this way is a win / win / win proposition. You get great books for a great price, CBD gets the sale and we get an excellent referral fee from CBD.

This week’s Bargains:

231217: Mandate to Difference: An Invitation to the Contemporary Church Mandate to Difference: An Invitation to the Contemporary Church

By Walter Brueggemann / Westminster John Knox Press

$5.99 – Save 70%!!!

What role should the church play in the world today? This is the question esteemed theologian Walter Brueggeman strives to answer in his work Mandate to Difference: An Invitation to the Contemporary Church. His most recent collection of essays calls the church to “set itself in tension with the rest of the world.” Instead of drawing inward, Brueggemann asks the church to publicly choose a different way—to “courageously defy political polarization, consumerism, and militarism.” By demonstrating a different way, the church can lead the world forward “and adversaries can be turned to allies and to friends.”Brueggeman is the William Marcellus McPheeters Professor Emeritus of Old Testament at Columbia Theological Seminary, Decatur, Georgia.

829541DA: Tell It Slant: A Conversation on the Language of Jesus in His Stories & Prayers - Slightly Imperfect Tell It Slant: A Conversation on the Language of Jesus in His Stories & Prayers – Slightly Imperfect

By Eugene H. Peterson / Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. / Hardback

$6.99 – Save 71%!!!

2009 Christianity Today Book Award of Merit in Spirituality

Just as God used words both to create the world and to give us commandments, we too use words for many different purposes. In fact, we use the same language to talk to each other and to talk to God. Can our everyday speech, then, be just as important as the words and prayers we hear from the pulpit? Eugene Peterson unequivocally says “Yes!”

Tell It Slant explores how Jesus used language—he was earthy, not abstract; metaphorical, not dogmatic. His was not a direct language of information or instruction but an indirect, oblique language requiring a participating imagination—“slant” language. In order to witness and teach accurately in Jesus’ name, then, it is important for us to use language the way he did.

027373DA: Creed Without Chaos: Exploring Theology in the Writings of Dorothy L. Sayers Creed Without Chaos: Exploring Theology in the Writings of Dorothy L. Sayers

By Laura K. Simmons / Baker

$5.99 – Save 75%!!!

This elegant and accessible book takes an in-depth look at the life and thought of the brilliant, yet little-known theologian, Dorothy L. Sayers. Author Laura K. Simmons examines Sayers’s thoughts on topics ranging from the incarnation and the Trinity to work ethics and the arts. Simmons does great justice to a woman whose goal was to avoid Christian “slip-slop and fiddle-faddle,” and in doing so, introduces the modern church to a brilliant thinker.

432682: Cloister Talks: Learning from My Friends the Monks Cloister Talks: Learning from My Friends the Monks

By Jon M. Sweeney / Brazos Press

$2.99 – Save 77%!!!

“We can show you how to be quiet, how to listen, but only God can show you the other stuff,” Father Ambrose told Jon Sweeney long ago. “What stuff?” he replied. “You.”This is just one of the many conversations Sweeney shares in Cloister Talks-a series of glimpses into his decades-long friendships with Cistercian and Benedictine monks in various monasteries across the country. The contemplative way embodied by these communal brothers has been the single greatest source of guidance in Sweeney’s journey of faith. Here he shares with poignant honesty the wisdom and insight for everyday living he has gained along the way.

Sweeney’s conversations with monks engage various universal areas of life, including life, death, love, work, play, and spirituality. Readers will emerge with a deeper understanding of this ancient way of Christianity-a much needed antidote to the hurry of contemporary life. The monastics who populate these pages have spent a combined century and a half in their sacred vocation. They hold the keys to many of the things we all yearn for: stillness, solitude, simplicity, contemplation, and clarity of purpose.

226180: The Richness of Augustine: His Contextual and Pastoral Theology The Richness of Augustine: His Contextual and Pastoral Theology

By Mark Ellingsen / Westminster John Knox Press

$7.99 – Save 73%!!!

In an inclusive reading of Augustine, Ellingsen reveals a patterned conceptual richness in Augustine’s thought. He demonstrates that the Augustinian traditions claimed by the Catholic church, the Presbyterian church, and virtually every Protestant denomination all have validity. The Richness of Augustine is a wonderful introduction and a rich ecumenical and historical resource. It is the first introduction that places in focus the significance of Augustine’s African cultural and ethnic roots.

 

“Write What You See.

A review of
The Pastor: A Memoir.
By Eugene Peterson.

Reviewed by Margaret D’Anieri.

[ Enter here to win one of five copies
of this book that we are giving away! ]

THE PASTOR- Eugene PetersonThe Pastor: A Memoir.
By Eugene Peterson.
Hardback: HarperOne, 2011.
Buy now:  [ ChristianBook.com ]

In an article titled “Books in Search of an Author,” Lillian Daniel wrote, “Pastors are always complaining about what they did not learn in seminary. The book I wish for is along these lines but is not about boiler repair, tuck-pointing and the exact measurements for an elevator that will hold a coffin. I wish I knew more about these things, but I do not want to read about them. As a pastor, I simply long to read more books by pastors about being a pastor.”[i] The search has found its author. Peterson himself notes an encounter with someone described to him as a “leading pastoral theologian”, author of eight “influential” books. Peterson later found out this man had been an associate pastor for one year; he looked in the index of all eight books and didn’t find a single reference to prayer.

This memoir is a reflection on the ingredients that have gone into Peterson’s formation as a pastor, the refining of his own call in a period of time he calls “the badlands”, and his understanding of pastoral identity in our day and age. Best known as the author of The Message, a contemporary paraphrase of the Bible, Peterson grounds his vocation as writer and pastor in words from the book of Revelation:

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Eugene Peterson - THE PASTORWe’re giving away FIVE copies of Eugene’s Peterson’s excellent new memoir, THE PASTOR (Read our review above…)

You may enter to win once per day as long as the contest is running…
(Additional entries only need to complete steps #2 and #3.)

*************************

To Enter the contest:

1) Receive our free weekly online edition via email -or-
LIKE our Facebook page (LGT: More info…
Sorry, following us on Twitter does not count here…  )

2) Post the following message on your blog, Facebook Page, or on Twitter:
I just entered to win a copy of Eugene Peterson’s THE PASTOR from The Englewood Review ( @ERBks )! You can enter too: http://su.pr/1I7NHa

3) Leave a comment below noting which option you chose
for #1 and a link to your post for #2 before 12AM on Friday March 18, 2011.

We will draw the winners at random after the contest ends, and will notify them within a week.

 

A Generative Excess in Reality

A Review of
For the Beauty of the Church:
Casting a Vision for the Arts
.

W. David O. Taylor, editor.

Reviewed by Brent Aldrich.


For the Beauty of the Church:
Casting a Vision for the Arts
.

W. David O. Taylor, editor.
Paperback: Baker Books, 2010.
Buy Now: [ ChristianBook.com ]


“Beauty is simply reality itself, perceived in a special way that gives it a resplendent value of its own. Everything that is, is beautiful insofar as it is real… The genius of the artist finds its way by the affinity of creative sympathy, or conaturality into the living law that rules the universe. ”

— Thomas Merton, from No Man is an Island

For the Beauty of the ChurchThese lines from Merton’s essay “Conscience, Freedom, and Prayer” have seemed to me to be the most generous description of art as anything I’ve come across: it is expansive and encompassing (“everything…insofar as it is real”) and it binds art to the rest of life, and not just life, but life in its reality, (a “resplendent value of its own”). This broad vision for art (which I will try to expand further) is in contrast to theories of aesthetics, of work, of theology, of ecclesiology, etc., that are marked by limitation and fragmentation. What Merton does so wonderfully is to affirm that none of these can be separated; God is at work reconciling all things, and in our human arts we participate in that work. The reconciliation of all things seems to be the starting place for any vision for ‘the arts’ or for the church.

For the Beauty of the Church: Casting a Vision for the Arts is a new collection of essays edited by W. David O. Taylor, and birthed out of the “Transforming Culture” conference in Austin, bringing together artists and pastors to talk about the church and the arts. The eight essays in this book, from writers such as Andy Crouch, Eugene Peterson, and Jeremy Begbie, traverse often very different perspectives on said topic, from Andy Crouch’s chapter which offers a broad view of culture-making, to what seems to be more of an emphasis on some sort of “arts ministry,” whether it’s directly called that or not. That said, I have a hard time engaging with very many of these essays because of an underlying vision of art, church, worship, and work that is too narrow. I want to be careful because I do appreciate that these conversations are being had, but I hope to stir imaginations beyond ‘ministries’ or ‘outreach;’ beyond the once-a-week ‘worship service;’ and beyond making “Christian” a marketable adjective.

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