Archives For Equality

 

“The insistence to relegate church roles based on gender, rather than gifting has meant the minimizing of untold numbers of women solely because of their femininity.” So says writer Pam Hogeweide, both from personal experience and from hearing the stories of many other women. Those are the stories she tells in Unladylike: Resisting the Injustice of Inequality in the Church.

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“The Beloved Community
of Conversion and Discipleship”

A Review of
Welcoming Justice:
God’s Movement Toward Beloved Community
.
by Charles Marsh and John Perkins.

Reviewed by Thomas T. Turner II.

[ Read an excerpt of this book here ]


Welcoming Justice:
God’s Movement Toward Beloved Community
.
by Charles Marsh and John Perkins.

Paperback: IVP Books,  2009.
Buy now: [ ChristianBook.com ]

Charles Marsh / John Perkins - WELCOMING JUSTICEWatching segments of Martin Luther King’s “I Have A Dream” speech , I realized that the things I saw there were black and white — literally and figuratively speaking.  The film, now pushing towards fifty years, is grainy and showing too little or too much contrast, a nostalgic look back to a time that wasn’t really that long ago in the history of things.  The American people was black and white as well, and the Civil Rights movement, in its glorious triumph, pushed forth some of the most drastic social changes in the history of America in just a few years full of climactic victories.  The battles were won, yet the war wasn’t over for many in the Civil Rights movement who saw the vision of the movement as a push not for racial equality but something far greater and more whole: the beloved community of all.  Charles Marsh and John Perkins share in their book Welcoming Justice the memories and stories of the ongoing civil rights struggle and illustrate how the movement toward beloved community should be the goal of those who follow the way of Christ.

The civil rights movement, at the height of its success, divorced itself from the church.  In saying Dr. Martin Luther King’s name, we too often forget that  that he was a reverend as well.  The civil rights movement started as a Christian social justice movement, and, in a lesson just as timely today, it was co-opted by powers within the movement that cut out the spiritual foundation of social justice. Marsh writes, “without its unifying spiritual vision, the movement’s goal was no longer to identify particular social and economic ills that could be improved upon through political organizing and social reform” (25).

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