Archives For Elsewhere

 

I have been on the road for the last couple of weeks with my Slow Church co-author John Pattison, talking with churches throughout the southeastern U.S. about that book and my new book, Reading for the Common Good.  It’s been good to get the new book into people’s hands and to begin conversations about it.

Reading for the Common Good: How Books Help Our Churches and Neighborhoods Flourish
C. Christopher Smith

Paperback: IVP Books, 2016
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle

 

I am deeply grateful for these great reviews of the book that have been posted within the last couple of weeks. Here are some clips (with links to the full reviews)…

Joe Johnson:

“Working for the flourishing of churches, neighborhoods, and the world cannot be done without the empowering work of the Holy Spirit, and I think it’s a reasonable proposal to argue that reading is an important means by which the Spirit works. Reading for the Common Good makes a very interesting case for the communal importance of reading and conversation, and it paints a portrait of what local church life can be like that is well worth pursuing. I recommend it.”
[ Read the full review ]

Continue Reading…

 

Haven’t done one of these columns for awhile…

Here are three recent reviews of note…

Barbara Melosh reviews two books on stuff for The Christian Century:

Stuff:
Compulsive Hoarding and the Meaning of Things

Randy O. Frost and Gail Steketee
Paperback: Mariner, 2011.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ] [ Kindle ]

Objects of our Affections.
Uncovering My Family’s Past, One Chair,
Pistol, and Pickle Fork at a Time

Lisa Tracy
Hardback: Bantam, 2011.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ] [ Kindle ]

We have become a nation of rich fools. Although the average house size has nearly doubled since 1970, self-storage units, once nearly nonexistent, are a booming business, comprising more than 45,000 facilities with 2 billion square feet of space, most of it full. As cheap goods become more available and our living spaces get bigger, we spend more and more time managing our possessions. “We may own the things in our homes,” Randy O. Frost and Gail Steketee observe, “but they own us as well.” Or as the sage of Concord, Ralph Waldo Emerson, put it a century and a half ago, “Things are in the saddle, and ride mankind.”

[ Read the full review … ]

Continue Reading…