Archives For Ecology

 

The Chronic Ache of Injustice
 
A Review of 
 

Love in a Time of Climate Change:
Honoring Creation, Establishing Justice
Sharon Delgado

Paperback: Fortress Press, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Teresa Langness
 
 
Hurricane Harvey jolted Houstonites out of their homes and armchair television viewers out of their comfort zones, especially in light of rapid increase of “500-year hurricanes” devastating the region in the past five years. A month earlier, a newly released book had asked readers to hear not only the cries of their countrymen and women but the chronic ache of injustice among climate change victims around the world.

The title of Sharon Delgado’s new book shifts the topic of climate change out of its usual dimensions, which too often buck wildly from well-corralled layers of scientific research into the muddier bog of political rhetoric.

Through crisp storytelling, personal experience and articulate up-to-the-minute research, Love in the Time of Climate Change posits a theory that we must deeply understand but look beyond both. We must act not only with our minds but with our hearts and our feet to safeguard all members of our human family during the current age and stage of climate change.

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What has Bioregionalism
to Do with Discipleship?

 
A Feature Review of 

Watershed Discipleship: Reinhabiting Bioregional Faith and Practice
Ched Myers

Paperback: Cascade Books, 2016
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]   [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by James Matichuk
 
 

This review originally appeared on the reviewer’s blog.
Reprinted with permission. 
*** Visit his blog for many other insightful reviews!

Early Christians asked themselves, “What has Athens to do with Jerusalem?” wondering about the relationship between the Christian faith and pagan philosophy. Today many Christians raise a similar question: “What does my faith have to do with the environment?” Western Christianity has imbibed a functional Docetism since Constantine, placing salvation outside of creation’s realm. We’ve also been bequeathed the medieval Doctrine of Discovery, and Industrialization’s anthropological assumption which has enabled colonization and the exploitation of our natural resources (5-6). We’ve commodified our land and resources and a major divide continually grows between our Christian faith and our lived environments. We are now at a critical juncture in which human persons are making a major impact on our world. It is time to re-place Christian discipleship within our ecosystems.

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A Patient Attendance to Beauty
 
A Feature Review of 

God of Earth: Discovering a Radically Ecological Christianity.
Kristin Swenson

Paperback: WJK Books, 2016.
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [  Kindle ]
 
 
Reviewed by Alan Van Wyk
 
 

In her brief and stunningly beautiful meditation God of Earth: Discovering a Radically Ecological Christianity, Kristen Swenson proposes a rather simple theological experiment: to take seriously the Incarnation. Of course, it is never a simple thing to take a theological claim seriously; doing so does often lead to quite radical ends. Nevertheless, Swenson begins with that most basic of Christian claims: “the one eternal Creator God chose out of love to become incarnate in order to reconcile wayward human beings to God.” So no, it is not really a simple claim, but even here, in this opening, Swenson suggests a subtle shift. Taken seriously, the incarnation is no longer about The Incarnation, full stop, but about the incarnation of God; no longer about Jesus as the Incarnate, but about Jesus as the incarnation of God. And this shift opens, for Swenson, a series of questions:

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Janisse_Ray

Yesterday (Feb. 2) was the birthday of ecologist and nature writer, Janisse Ray. 

 
Here are two wonderful video clips that beautifully convey her passion for being attentive to and caring for the places in which we live.

This I Believe:

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Tomorrow is the birthday of Francis Schaeffer… 

I never really got into most of his work; I found him too much of a modernist, but there were two books of his that I still have a deep appreciation for… 

Here are excerpts from these books…

Art and the Bible
Francis Schaeffer

IVP Books, 1973.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

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This is a wonderful book trailer for one of this week’s best new book releases

 

The Wake: A Novel
Paul Kingsnorth

Paperback: Graywolf Press, 2015
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
Paul Kingsnorth is a writer who founded the Dark Mountain Project by accident one day in the pub and is still dealing with the consequences. The Dark Mountain Project is a network of writers, artists and thinkers who have stopped believing the stories that civilization tells itself. Seeing that the world is entering an age of ecological collapse, material contraction and social and political unravelling, Dark Mountain Project wants our cultural responses to reflect this reality rather than denying it. [ Read a NY Times article on DMP ]

As well as being the Project’s editorial director, he is also the author of two books of non-fiction and a collection of poetry, and a new novel.
 
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Living Reconciled to Creation

A Review of

Introducing Evangelical Ecotheology: Foundations in Scripture, Theology, History, and Praxis
Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A.J. Swoboda

Paperback: Baker Academic, 2014
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

Reviewed Maria Drews

 

A couple of weeks ago I attended a lecture by Elizabeth Kolbert, a New Yorker staff-writer and author of the New York Times’ Bestseller, The Sixth Extinction. For an hour and a half, she outlined our world’s mounting crises of climate change, ocean acidification, and invasive species. So many of us arrived to hear the undeniably bad news that they scrambled to fill the halls outside of the auditorium with extra seats.

 

A few weeks later, I attended a lecture by journalist Naomi Klein, recent author of This Changes Everything, a journalistic exploration of climate change and capitalism. At the end of her lecture, she stated that she thought climate change was a spiritual crisis. Al Gore had expressed a similar sentiment when he received the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, saying, “The climate crisis is not a political issue, it is a moral and spiritual challenge to all of humanity.”
 
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Informing Our Present by Examining our Past
 
A Review of

Sustainability: A History

Jeremy Caradonna

Hardback: Oxford UP, 2014
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Taylor Brorby
 
 
 
Sustainability is, for better or worse, the buzzword of our time. Sustainable agriculture. Sustainable city planning. Food sustainability. Business sustainability. A quick Google search yields over 118,000,000 results for the word sustainability. As Jeremy L. Caradonna points out in the introduction to his book, Sustainability: A History, Bill McKibben was most definitely wrong in his New York Times opinion piece in 1996 when  he said sustainability was a “buzzless buzzword” that was “born partly in an effort to obfuscate.”
 
At just over 250 pages, Sustainability: A History, is a book that takes the reader on a historical journey which examines the origin of the word sustainability, the conditions of the Industrial Revolution–which helped bring about the idea of sustainable development–the advent of the modern Environmental Movement, a new view of economics–eco-nomics–and a call-to-arms as the final wrap-up, “The Future: 10 Challenges for Sustainability.”

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Today I stumbled upon the series of E.F. Schumacher Lectures that are available as 99c Kindle bargains!

E.F. Schumacher is best known for his critique of Western economies and his proposals for human-scale, decentralized and appropriate technologies. According to The Times Literary Supplement, his 1973 book Small Is Beautiful: Economics as if People Mattered is among the 100 most influential books published since World War II. (via Wikipedia)
 

Wendell Berry gave the inaugural lecture in this series, but unfortunately it is not available in a Kindle Edition.
HOWEVER, you can listen to the full lecture (for FREE) online by CLICKING HERE.

I don’t know if these titles are on sale or if 99c is their standard price…

Here’s a list of the ones that I think are most important, but I highly recommend that you

Browse the full list of lectures

 

1) Becoming Native To This Place by Wes Jackson
– 99c

2) Call For A Revolution In Agriculture – Wes Jackson
– 99c
3) The Most Important Number In The World by Bill McKibben
– 99c

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A Clear and Highly Developed Vision of a Better World

A Feature Review of

Distant Neighbors: The Selected Letters Of Wendell Berry and Gary Snyder.

Hardback: Counterpoint, 2014
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

Reviewed by Michelle E. Wilbert

 

In the affectionate introduction to this edifying collection of correspondence between novelist, poet, and cultural critic Wendell Berry and Gary Snyder, the “Poet Laureate of Deep Ecology,” an essayist, activist, and recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1974 for his book Turtle Island, editor Chad Wriglesworth relays the earliest articulation of the relationship between the two men, found in a short essay sent by Berry to Snyder after his returning home to Kentucky following his first visit to Snyder’s homestead in the San Juan Ridge area of southern California. While offering his observations on their various shared affinities and concerns – land, community, and the sense that “being native to a place” involves examining the questions that would lead to a commitment to arresting the “pattern of imposing human will upon the land” and to living within creaturely limits in conformity to the local ecology – he concluded his reveries by metaphorically extending his hand with the declaration, “We are neighbors—distant neighbors,” and thus began a friendship that has lasted more than 40 years and has been conducted largely through the somewhat lost art of epistolary.

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