Archives For Eating

 

Here’s an excellent video interview with Norman Wirzba, discussing his newest book, Food and Faith, which was our 2011 Book of the Year.

Norman Wirzba - Food and FaithThe video is almost an hour long, but is worth the time as it gives a rich sense of why this book is so important.

Food and Faith: A Theology of Eating.
Norman Wirzba.

Paperback: Cambridge UP, 2011.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]

[ Read an Excerpt from the book… ] 
[ Read our review… ]



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“Edification, Socialization, Conversation”

A Review of
In the Beginning was the Meal:
Social Experimentation
and Early Christian Identity.

by Hal Taussig.

 Reviewed by Chris Smith.

 

In the Beginning was the Meal:
Social Experimentation
and Early Christian Identity.

Hal Taussig.
Hardback: Fortress Press, 2009.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]

I heard an interview on NPR several years ago with Fred Rogers (a.k.a., Mr. Rogers), and one thing in particular that he said in that interview lodged itself permanently in my head, namely that (and I’m paraphrasing from memory here) the most significant formative practice in a child’s development is dinner-table conversation.  This observation has come back to mind as I reflect from time to time on Christian formation in the Church and particularly did so the past week as I was reading Hal Taussig’s new book In the Beginning was the Meal: Social Experimentation and Early Christian Identity.  I was very excited when I heard about the release of this book, as it brought together two things for which I have a deep appreciation: Early Christianity and eating.  Ultimately, I found the book to be somewhat disappointing in that it was intended for a highly specialized academic audience and in that Taussig represents a common academic theological position in his skepticism about traditional understandings of Jesus and Christianity.  Setting aside both of these concerns (as best as possible), I’d like to explore here the implications of Taussig’s research on the ways that we worship together in our churches and the ways we are formed into the image of Christ.  Taussig himself, actually initiates some reflections in this direction in his epilogue, which is perhaps the most accessible section of the book.

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