Archives For David Fitch

 

This week, I’ve been revising the theology chapter of my forthcoming book on conversation, HOW THE BODY OF CHRIST TALKS (Brazos Press, 2019), and getting ready for some upcoming events that I will be doing on conversation.

 

Here’s a list of books that have played a vital role in shaping the theology of my work on conversation.

 

By ERB Editor C. Christopher Smith

 

   

Faithful Presence: Seven Disciplines That Shape the Church for Mission 

David Fitch

Continue Reading…

 

Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

   

Seven Practices for the Church on Mission

David Fitch

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

Continue Reading…

 

Here are 5 essential ebooks on sale now that are worth checking out:
(David Fitch, J.K. Rowling, Soong-Chan Rah MORE)

 

THEOLOGY CLASSICS –
15 Essential Ebooks Under $3ea!
  

 

Via our sister website Thrifty Christian Reader
To keep up with all the latest ebook deals,
be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook

 

#1:
Faithful Presence: Seven Disciplines That Shape the Church for Mission

David Fitch

*** $5.99 ***

Continue Reading…

 

Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

Liturgy of the Ordinary: Sacred Practices in Everyday Life

Tish Harrison Warren

 

Read a review by Byron Borger of Hearts and Minds Books
(and for a limited time, buy the book from him for half-off!)

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

 

Continue Reading…

 

David Fitch

Here is the second of the audio recordings from the Slow Church Conference that we hosted last week here at Englewood Christian Church.
*** CLICK HERE for the 1st talk that we posted, by Willie Jennings.

Our aim for the conference was to foster conversation around the work of several key theologians whose work inspired the Slow Church book that John Pattison and I wrote.

[ Download a FREE sampler of the SLOW CHURCH book here… ]

David Fitch is B. R. Lindner Chair of Evangelical Theology at Northern Seminary in Chicago.

Continue Reading…

 

On April 3-5, we will be hosting:

Slow Church Conference

The Slow Church Conference

A conversation curated by Chris Smith and John Pattison,
co-authors of the Slow Church book
(coming June 2014, IVP / Praxis Books)

Registration and More Details:
http://SlowChurchConference.com

When: April 3-5, 2014 (Thursday evening through Saturday lunch)
Where: Englewood Christian Church / Indianapolis
Cost:  $99 (Early Bird, through Jan. 31 Feb 7)  / $149 (Feb 8 and later)
NEW: Starting Feb 8, we will be offering a Student Rate of $99!
(Students should use promotion code: STUDENT2014 )
        This price includes 6 locally-sourced meals during the conference

 
Keynote Speakers Include: Christine Pohl, David Fitch, Phil Kenneson, Carol Johnston
(Plus one other distinguished speaker, who will be announced soon)
 


We’d love to get your help spreading the word about this special event… (Even if you won’t be able to be here yourself… )

  1. If you plan to participate, register now
  2.  

  3. Share the link to the conference website with others who might be interested:
    http://SlowChurchConference.com/
  4.  

  5. Invite Facebook friends who might be interested, using our special FB E-vite.

 

We really appreciate your help in getting the word out
about the Slow Church Conference!

 

Are You Prodigal Enough?

A Review of

Prodigal Christianity: 10 Signposts into the Missional Frontier
David Fitch and Geoff Holsclaw

Hardback: Jossey-Bass, 2013.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 
Reviewed by Christian J. Amondson
 

CLICK HERE for a video overview of the book

 
 
It was the winter of their discontent. David Fitch and Geoff Holsclaw (co-pastors of a missional church in the northwest suburbs of Chicago) found themselves left out in the cold, disappointed with the “third-way” paths beyond the conservative-liberal theology wars of North American Evangelicals. The Emergent path (McLaren, Pagitt, Jones, Bell) initially offered a sense of hope for conversations that “challenged existing assumptions and sought new ways of moving forward” (xxi). Yet, as helpful as those conversations were, they ultimately left participants feeling uneasy, unable “to enter confidently into God’s living presence” (xxii). The Neo-Reformed path (Piper, DeYoung, Mohler, Carson, Keller) offered a necessary corrective to this disquiet, reminding Evangelicals that one can be missional and committed to gospel proclamation. But these commitments were often articulated dogmatically, focusing more on being “right” than being in right relationship. Was there an alternative to these dead-end options? Was there a path that could be both thoroughly committed to the proclamation of the gospel and radically sensitive to the cultural realities of real people in our post-Christian world? Fitch and Holsclaw believed there was, so they collected their notes, blog posts, and essays in an effort to articulate a new way by which Evangelicals could move out of the patterns that kept them “trapped within a bygone cultural consensus of Christian dominance that no longer exists” (xxiv). Prodigal Christianity is what emerged from their reflections.

Continue Reading…

 

This new book offers a challenging new perspective on Christianity that is alternative to both traditional evangelicalism and emergent Christianity.

Watch for our review coming later today!

Prodigal Christianity: 10 Signposts into the Missional Frontier
David Fitch and Geoff Holsclaw

Leadership Network Series
Hardback: Jossey-Bass, 2013.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

These videos offer an overview of the book’s argument…

Introduction to the book:





Continue Reading…

 

Reviving Evangelicalism?

A review of

The End of Evangelicalism?:
Discerning a New Faithfulness for Mission
.
By David Fitch

Review by Chris Smith.


The End of Evangelicalism? - David FitchThe End of Evangelicalism?:
Discerning a New Faithfulness for Mission
.
David Fitch.
Paperback: Cascade Books, 2011.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]

David Fitch’s first book, The Great Giveaway: Reclaiming the Mission of the Church from… cemented his role as a prominent critic of contemporary evangelicalism.  Although he laid out some pointed critiques in that book, he also demonstrated a deep love for the evangelical tradition, out of which he sought to reform rather than abolish evangelicalism.  In his newest book, The End of Evangelicalism?: Discerning a New Faithfulness for Mission, Fitch continues on the same trajectory, hammering home a multi-faceted critique of evangelicalism and yet arguing just as vehemently that the heart of evangelicalism should be retained.

Continue Reading…

 

“Defining Emerging Christianity

A Review of
An Emerging Dictionary for
The Gospel and Culture

By Leonard Hjalmarson.

Reviewed by Chris Smith.


An Emerging Dictionary for
The Gospel and Culture

Leonard Hjalmarson.

Paperback: Resource Publications/Wipf and Stock, 2010.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]

EMERGING DICTIONARY... HjalmarsonLen Hjalmarson has been in the middle of conversations about emerging forms of church for many years now. His blog, NextReformation.com , has been not only a place for him to post his keen insights, but also a place for conversation and exploration. Thus, I was excited to hear that he had recently published a book rooted in his experience in these conversations.  An Emerging Dictionary for the Gospel and Culture is indeed as it sets out to be “a roving, eclectic dictionary that is both ridiculously current and particular, and at the same time broadly inclusive, reaching back to Augustine and St. Benedict … the ABC’s of the emerging and missional conversations.”  Hjalmarson does a superb job introducing the topics that he has included here, which basically fall into the two categories of biographical entries and conceptual entries.  All entries here are brief (rarely more than 2 or 3 pages), engaging and helpful in their introducing the person or concept at hand.  I imagine that most readers, even those who have been deeply invested in the emerging and missional church conversations for many years will find at least a few entries here that are surprising or unknown.  For instance, the philosopher of science in me was delighted to see the entry on Thomas Kuhn here, as his work is essential to our work of understanding the times in which we live, and yet his name does not pop up often in church conversations.  There are also a number of terms here that are essential to understanding postmodern criticism – e.g., difference and L’avenir.   Hjalmarson also does a wonderful job at interweaving the entries here; one does not typically think of a dictionary as a book to sit down and read from cover to cover, but this engaging and well-written work flows along nicely and is certainly an exception to that rule!

Continue Reading…