Archives For David Dark

 

2009 Englewood Book of the Year

David Dark - Sacredness of Questioning Everything

The Sacredness of
Questioning Everything.

David Dark.
Paperback:
Zondervan, April 2009.
Buy now:
[
ChristianBook.com ]

Few writers have the capacity that David Dark has, to orchestrate familiar stories from literature and popular culture as part of engaging theological discourse. In his new book The Sacredness of Questioning Everything, David emphasizes that questioning, and more broadly that conversation, is an essential practice in the life of the Church. Certainly, his words rang true to us here at Englewood Christian Church, as conversation has been one of the defining practices of our church community.

“In SACREDNESS, Dark champions the power — and the spiritual necessity — of the open mind. Asking questions of our convictions, assumptions, perversions, religions, is the only way to let the light and air into them. ‘There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in,’ he maintains, using Leonard Cohen’s words. Questioning our God(s), our government, our eschatology, our language or our lusts, opens them to the possibility of rehabilitation, redemption and ultimately resurrection.” (from our review)

Indeed, conversation is fundamental to our identity as the community of God’s people, relating to one another and to God. It is a lost art that must be recovered and Dark skillfully navigates the complexity of life in conversation and we would do well to follow his lead.


Click here to see our 2008 Book of the Year…

 


On June 16, Bloomsday (a holiday in remembrance of James Joyce and his novel Ulysses), we sat down with David Dark to talk via Twitter about his new book: The Sacredness of Questioning Everything.  Here is our conversation:

  1. I can’t think of a better way to celebrate #Bloomsday than to sit down with @DavidDark and talk about his new book. 1:00 PM Jun 16th from web
  2. THE SACREDNESS OF QUESTIONING EVERYTHING is not only a plea for critical engagement, > 1:01 PM Jun 16th from web
  3. it also is a gloriously dizzying tour through literature and pop music! 1:20 PM Jun 16th from web
  4. @daviddark Welcome! Thanks for sitting down with us! 1:02 PM Jun 16th from web
  5. @ERBks glad to be “here” 1:02 PM Jun 16th from web
  6. @daviddark LOL! Your book is very countercultural > 1:03 PM Jun 16th from web
  7. @daviddark Why should people read it, especially ones who tremble at the thought of questioning everything? 1:03 PM Jun 16th from web
  8. @ERBks Well, potential reader, if you think asking questions is at the heart of developing (and keeping) your soul, this book’s for you> 1:04 PM Jun 16th from web
  9. @ERBks and if U think the opposite’s true (keeping your soul saved requires somehow silencing your mind) I’d say this book’s REALLY for you! 1:05 PM Jun 16th from web
    Continue Reading…

 


Tomorrow, June 10 beginning at 12PM ET, The Englewood Review of Books will engage Scot McKnight in a Twitter conversation about his recent book FASTING, which is part of Thomas Nelson’s “Ancient Practices” series, edited by Phyllis Tickle.

In order to follow this twinterview live, you will need follow both:
@ERBks and @ScotMcKnight

I will kick off the twinterview at 12 PM ET on June 10, and having a set number of questions, the interview will continue until all the questions are answered.

If you don’t use twitter, the interview will eventually be published on the ERB website.

Help us spread the word:

You won’t want to miss this special event!!!

Other upcoming twinterviews:

Monday June 15: David Dark ( @DavidDark )
on his book, The Sacredness of Questioning Everything.
Monday June 22: Will Samson ( @WASamson )
on his book, Enough: Contentment in An Age of Excess

AND WATCH FOR MORE TWINTERVIEWS THIS SUMMER ON @ERBKS !!!

 

“Rehabilitation, Redemption
and Ultimately Resurrection”

 

A Review of
The Sacredness of Questioning Everything.
by David Dark.

 Reviewed by Joshua Neds-Fox.

 

The Sacredness of Questioning Everything.
David Dark.
Paperback: Zondervan, 2009.
Buy now: [ Doulos Christou Books $13 ] [ Amazon ]

 

For a limited time! 
Download a Free Audiobook edition of this book
!!!

 

In attempting to reduce a book-length testimony to four or five paragraphs, there’s always the risk of perverting the author’s original intent (if, of course, he/she has something intentional to say).  When I say ‘perverting,’ I mean it in the sense that David Dark defines it in THE SACREDNESS OF QUESTIONING EVERYTHING: the object is “reduced to a thing… dispensed with, taken care of, filed away.”  “Perversion is pigeonholing,” he says, and I sincerely hope not to do this to Dark’s message, since I’m convinced he actually does have something to tell us.

 

In SACREDNESS, Dark champions the power — and the spiritual necessity — of the open mind.  Asking questions of our convictions, assumptions, perversions, religions, is the only way to let the light and air into them.  “There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in,” he maintains, using Leonard Cohen’s words.  Questioning our God(s), our government, our eschatology, our language or our lusts, opens them to the possibility of rehabilitation, redemption and ultimately resurrection.

Continue Reading…

 


To Nobodaddy
William Blake
(1757 – 1827)
(HT: David Dark)

 

Why art thou silent & invisible
Father of jealousy
Why dost thou hide thyself in clouds
From every searching Eye

Why darkness & obscurity
In all thy words & laws
That none dare eat the fruit but from
The wily serpents jaws
Or is it because Secresy
gains females loud applause.

 


BOOKS AND CULTURE reviews
Two Recent Books on Gardening.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/bc/2009/marapr/15.18.html

Like most of my American friends, I did not grow up a gardener. Unlike them, I grew up in God’s own garden, a shadowy and solemn rainforest cathedral choired by birds of paradise and guarded by poisonous vines, stink bugs, and death adders. Power chainsaws have desecrated most of the world’s rainforest temples during my own short youth, opening earth-wounds upon which farmers or palm oil companies smear the fertilizers and pesticides of agroscience, hoping to scab off fuel or a little food, survival or bio-profits, before the hard red clay puckers into dusty, sterile scars. Though many of my friends and acquaintances in Manila and Jakarta were exposed to third-eye levels of farming chemicals in childhood, few are interested in sacrificing the enticements of quick ‘n easy flower boxes for the perilous joy of a garden.

 

In the midst of a concrete jungle, Tim Stark and Robert Pogue Harrison have been helpful guides as I begin to discover the relationships between my dinner table, my soul, and the soil. Harrison, a professor of Italian literature at Stanford, has written the philosophical Gardens: An Essay on the Human Condition. Stark, a failed freelance writer from New York City, has penned Heirloom: Notes from an Accidental Tomato Farmer, a juicily written tale of his mad affair with the tomato.

Read the full review:
http://www.christianitytoday.com/bc/2009/marapr/15.18.html

GARDENS: AN ESSAY ON THE HUMAN CONDITION.
Robert Pogue Harrision.

Hardcover: U of Chicago Press, 2008.
Buy Now:  [ Doulos Christou Books $20 ] [ Amazon ]

HEIRLOOM: NOTES FROM AN ACCIDENTAL
TOMATO FARMER.

Tim Stark.
Hardcover: Broadway Books, 2008.
Buy Now:  [ Doulos Christou Books $20 ] [ Amazon ]


Music Critic Andy Whitman
Reflects on David Dark’s New Book
The Sacredness of Questioning Everything.
http://andywhitman.blogspot.com/2009/04/sacredness-of-questioning-everything.html

I write that, and quote from several sources at length, only to say that David Dark’s latest book, The Sacredness of Questioning Everything, ought to be required reading for human beings, regardless of their religious or political stripes. David Dark is one of my favorite Christian thinkers, and his earlier books Everyday Apocalypse and The Gospel According to America: A Meditation on a God-Blessed, Christ-Haunted Idea have, respectively, outlined the in-breaking of truth in popular culture, and our national overconfidence in our own righteousness. For his third book, Dark pulls out all the stops, and surveys the stories that we hear on a daily basis, stories about God and religion, our nation and its history, our self-defined passions, our sacred cows, our morality. We hear these stories in a thousand places; in television broadcasts, in classrooms, in the books we read, in our choice of friends and the viewpoints we are willing to take in, in the magazines we subscribe to, the music we listen to, the web sites we frequent. To a large extent, they define our identity.

Read the full piece:
http://andywhitman.blogspot.com/2009/04/sacredness-of-questioning-everything.html


The Sacredness of Questioning Everything.
David Dark.

Paperback: Zondervan, 2009.
Buy now: [ Doulos Christou Books $13 ] [ Amazon ]


Scott McKnight Briefly Reviews
Andrew Marin’s Love is An Orientation.
http://blog.beliefnet.com/jesuscreed/2009/05/the-story-of-with-1.html

Andrew Marin has earned the right to be heard about gays and the Church. Why? His book, Love Is an Orientation: Elevating the Conversation With the Gay Community , tells the story. That subtitle is what is needed next, and I think it’s the Third Way.

Some are wearied by this discussion.
Some are worked into passionate pronouncements.
Few are willing to sort out the issues, both biblical and relational, and then move into genuine Christian engagement. Andrew Marin does the latter.

Read the full review:
http://blog.beliefnet.com/jesuscreed/2009/05/the-story-of-with-1.html

Love Is an Orientation:
Elevating the Conversation With the Gay Community.

Andrew Marin.

Paperback: IVP Books, 2009.
Buy now: [ Doulos Christou Books $13 ]  [ Amazon ]