Archives For Cross

 

[easyazon-image align=”left” asin=”1620325357″ locale=”us” height=”333″ src=”http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/417JA2AtogL.jpg” width=”222″ alt=”Douglas Jones” ]Following in the Way of the Cross

A Feature Review of

Dismissing Jesus: How We Evade the Way of the Cross
Douglas Jones

Paperback: Wipf and Stock, 2013.
Buy now:  [ [easyazon-link asin=”1620325357″ locale=”us”]Amazon[/easyazon-link] ]   [ [easyazon-link asin=”B00DJ766Q8″ locale=”us”]Kindle[/easyazon-link] ]

Reviewed by Tim Otto.
 
Although I’m not the “Novice Master” equivalent in my New Monastic community, I do get to teach a class for new apprentices. A great joy of my life is that I get to help people open books as gifts. Staples of the class are books such as Jayber Crow by Wendell Berry, Does God Need the Church? by Gerhard Lohfink, and Being Church by John Alexander.
 
Recently I’ve been thinking that we need a book focused on the revolutionary Jesus, and how the good news he proclaimed creates a new society. Happily, there is a terrific new book that does just that—Douglas M. Jones’s Dismissing Jesus: How We Evade the Way of the Cross.

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Our latest book giveaway…

We’re giving away 6 copies of :

Book Giveaway -James Cone's THE CROSS AND THE LYNCHING TREE

James Cone’s The Cross and the Lynching Tree
[ Read our Review ]


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Enter to win a Free copy of this book
(It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3!) :

NOTE: You may enter to win once per day as long as the contest is running…
(Additional entries only need to complete steps #2 and #3.)

1) Receive our free weekly online edition via email – or –
LIKE our Facebook page (LGT: More info… )

2) Post the following message on your blog, Facebook Page, or on Twitter:
I just entered to win one of six copies of James Cone’s THE CROSS AND THE LYNCHING TREE from @ERBks! You can too: http://su.pr/93syC4

3) Leave a comment below noting which option you chose
for #1 **and** a link to your post for #2 before 12AM ET on Friday January 27, 2011.
(Leaving a comment is essential as we will draw the giveaway winners from among the comments left.)

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We will draw the winners at random after the giveaway ends, and will notify them within a week.

 

Cross and Lynching TreeImmersing ourselves Deeper
into God’s Mission of
Reconciling Creation

A Review of

The Cross and the Lynching Tree.
James Cone.
Hardback: Orbis Books, 2011.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

Reviewed by Chris Smith.

I have long had a deep respect for the work of James Cone.  I don’t always agree with him, but even when I don’t I find his work compelling and engaging.  Although I am sympathetic to his emphasis on liberation theology, I don’t agree with the way in which he leaves the door open for the use of violent means in pursuit of liberation. Similarly, I’ve never been able to accept his embrace of both Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X, as “advocating different methods that corrected and complemented each other, as they worked for the same goal – the liberation of black people from white supremacy.”  Despite my disagreements with other parts of his work, I am convinced that in his newest book The Cross and the Lynching Tree, he is spot on.

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835492: The Kingdom and the Cross

A Review of

The Kingdom and the Cross

By James Bryan Smith
Paperback: IVP Books, 2011.

Buy now: [ ChristianBook.com ]

Reviewed by Kevin Book-Satterlee.

Nails, wooden crossbeams, and a crown of thorns converge to symbolize the death of Jesus.  Lent is a time of reflection upon accumulation of these symbols.  Quite possibly best represented in a wall-mount crucifix or gleaming icon, the Protestant tradition often forgets this season and its purpose in reorienting towards the kingdom of God.

James Bryan Smith, cofounder of the Renovaré movement, has published a new booklet, The Kingdom and the Cross (InterVarsity Press), which serves as a timely Lenten reflection of Jesus’s death.  Smith’s major recent publishing contributions have been the books of the Apprentice Series (InterVarsity Press); The Kingdom and the Cross continues in the vein of reflective writing, characteristic of Smith’s works.

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