Archives For Christian Smith

 

Here are 5 essential ebooks on sale now that are worth checking out:
( Christian Smith, Peter Leithart, Ann Voskamp MORE )

 

Via our sister website Thrifty Christian Reader
To keep up with all the latest ebook deals,
be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook

  

#1:
The Bible Made Impossible: Why Biblicism Is Not a Truly Evangelical Reading of Scripture

Christian Smith

*** $2.99 ***

 

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Here are 5 essential ebooks on sale now that are worth checking out:
(Christian Smith, Suzanne Collins, Jonathan Safran-Foer, MORE)

Via our sister website Thrifty Christian Reader
To keep up with all the latest ebook deals,
be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook

 

What Is a Person?: Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good from the Person Up

Christian Smith

*** $3.77 ***

 
>>>>>> Part of a HUGE ebook sale that U Chicago Press is now running. BROWSE THE FULL SALE

 

NEXT EBOOK >>>>>

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Here are 5 essential ebooks on sale now that are worth checking out:
(Phyllis Tickle, Christian Smith, Renovare, Carl Honore, MORE)

Via our sister website Thrifty Christian Reader
To keep up with all the latest ebook deals,
be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook

 

 

The Age of the Spirit: How the Ghost of an Ancient Controversy Is Shaping the Church

Phyllis Tickle

*** $2.99 ***

Her most recent book…

NEXT EBOOK >>>>>

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Just stumbled today upon these videos of Miroslav Volf and Christian Smith discussing their newest books, both of which are featured in our Fall/Ordinary Time print issue, which just went to the printer.

A Public Faith:
How Followers of Christ Should Serve the Common Good

Miroslav Volf.
Paperback: Brazos Press, 2011.
Buy Now: [ Amazon – Paperback ] [ Amazon – Kindle ]


The Bible Made Impossible:
Why Biblicism Is Not a Truly Evangelical Reading of Scripture

Christian Smith.
Hardback: Baker Academic, 2011.
Buy now:  [ Amazon – Hardback ] [ Amazon – Kindle ]

Miroslav Volf on A Public Faith:

Watch the rest of this video:
[ Part 2] [ Part 3 ] [ Part 4 ] [ Part 5 ] [ Part 6 ]

Christian Smith on The Bible Made Impossible:

Watch the rest of this video:
[ Part 2] [ Part 3 ] [ Part 4 ] [ Part 5]

 

A Brief Review of

Souls in Transition:
The Religious and Spiritual Lives of Emerging Adults.
Christian Smith with Patricia Snell.
Hardback: Oxford UP, 2010.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]

Reviewed by Mark Eckel.

Swiss authorities studied how religious traditions are passed from generation to generation.  The results published in 2000 were staggering.  When the father of the home attends weekly services, 4 out of 10 children will regularly follow his example as adults.  But when dad’s participation is taken out of the equation, only 2% are committed to church or synagogue later in life.  Adult relationships in the life of a young person’s religious commitment can be described in simple “make or break” terms.

Christian Smith’s latest research advanced in the book Souls in Transition, confirms both the Swiss findings and biblical foundations.  Perhaps the most important statement in the book appears not in the text but in a footnote.  “One of the most common, if not the most common, among the variety of answers that teenagers offered was that they wished they were closer to their parents” (344).  Over and over again qualitative and quantitative sociological analysis reached the same conclusions: “Parents matter a great deal . . . in shaping religion during the emerging adult years” (246).  Of course, Solomon was ahead of the curve.  Timeless truths are drilled deep into ancient Scriptural practices.  The fear of Yahweh provides a family refuge when the righteous man sets the standard for his children (Proverbs 14:26; 20:7).

Continue Reading…

 

Food Fraud and Bees
BOOKFORUM reviews two new books
on the Food Crisis

http://www.bookforum.com/inprint/015_03/2724

Rowan Jacobsen monitors another distressing side effect of agribusiness consolidation in Fruitless Fall: The Collapse of the Honeybee and the Coming Agricultural Crisis. Jacobsen, a US food writer who has contributed to the New York Times and Saveur, examines colony collapse disorder (CCD), which hit the United States’ beekeeping industry in 2006. The syndrome affected half of the nation’s commercial bee operations, wiping out about thirty billion bees.

The most puzzling thing about the CCD outbreak was the abundance of possible triggers. Commercial bee operations were overrun with mites and viruses, and bees were kept on the go—fed corn syrup to stay alive between gigs pollinating monocrop farms. Meanwhile, the crops we have Apis mellifera pollinating are awash in pesticides; in some cases, plants are even genetically modified to produce the chemicals themselves. What’s more, monocrop farming is not conducive to bee health—all pollen is not created equal, and some types offer greater nutritional value than others. Bees need a mixture of pollen sources to sustain their health.

Read the full review:  http://www.bookforum.com/inprint/015_03/2724

Swindled: The Dark History of Food Fraud.
Bee Wilson.
Hardcover: Princeton UP, 2008.
Buy now [ Doulos Christou Books $21 ] [ Amazon ]


Fruitless Fall: The Collapse of the Honey Bee
and the Coming Agricultural Crisis.

Rowen Jacobsen.
Hardcover: Bloomsbury, 2008.
Buy now [ Doulos Christou Books $20 ] [ Amazon ]


Ron Sider reviews
PASSING THE PLATE: WHY AMERICAN CHRISTIANS
DON’T GIVE AWAY MORE MONEY
.
http://www.christianitytoday.com/bc/2008/006/5.11.html

Many have lamented the meager giving of American Christians. Others have questioned the data on which this criticism was based or pointed out that American Christians give more than those in most other nations. Now we have a careful, scholarly analysis of how much—i.e., how little—American Christians give, plus a sophisticated sociological analysis of why.

Passing the Plate: Why American Christians Don’t Give Away More Money is a powerful study about the pitifully small charitable donations of the richest Christians in history. In spite of the fact that most Christian denominations support tithing (see Appendix A), only a tiny fraction of American Christians actually tithe. Christian Smith, Michael O. Emerson, and Patricia Snell set out to discover why. Using a number of the best currently available data sets plus a survey and personal interviews of their own, the authors offer the best available information on what American Christians actually give to charitable causes and then try to figure out why such rich Christians give so little.

Read the full review:  http://www.christianitytoday.com/bc/2008/006/5.11.html

Passing the Plate: Why American Christians
Don’t Give Away More Money
.
Smith / Emerson / Snell.
Hardcover: Oxford UP, 2008.
Buy now  [ Amazon ]


The NY TIMES review of Toni Morrison’s
newest novel A MERCY
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/04/books/04kaku.html?_r=1

A horrifying act stood at the center of Toni Morrison’s 1987 masterwork, “Beloved”: a runaway slave, caught in her effort to escape, cuts the throat of her baby daughter with a handsaw, determined to spare the girl the fate she herself has suffered as a slave. A similarly indelible act stands at the center of Ms. Morrison’s remarkable new novella, “A Mercy,” a small, plangent gem of a story that is, at once, a kind of prelude to “Beloved” and a variation on that earlier book’s exploration of the personal costs of slavery — a system that moves men and women and children around “like checkers” and casts a looming shadow over both parental and romantic love.

Set some 200 years before “Beloved,” “A Mercy” conjures up the beautiful, untamed, lawless world that was America in the 17th century with the same sort of lyrical, verdant prose that distinguished that earlier novel. Gone are the didactic language and schematic architecture that hobbled the author’s 1998 novel, “Paradise”; gone are the cartoonish characters that marred her 2003 novel, “Love.” Instead Ms. Morrison has rediscovered an urgent, poetic voice that enables her to move back and forth with immediacy and ease between the worlds of history and myth, between ordinary daily life and the realm of fable.

All the central characters in this story are orphans, cast off by their parents or swept away from their families by acts of God or nature or human cruelty — literal or figurative exiles susceptible to the centrifugal forces of history. There is Jacob, an Anglo-Dutch trader, whose memories of his own parentless years on the streets “stealing food and cadging gratuities for errands” have left him with a “pulse of pity for orphans and strays.” There is his wife, Rebekka, who as a girl of 16 was sent abroad to America by her father, who, happy to have one less mouth to feed, readily accepted Jacob’s offer of “ ‘reimbursement’ for clothing, expenses and a few supplies” in exchange for a “healthy, chaste wife willing to travel abroad.” And there is Florens, whose mother sees the kindness in Jacob’s heart and begs him to take her young daughter (as payment for a debt owed by their domineering owner) in the hopes that the trader will give her a better life and the possibility of a future as a free woman, not a slave.

Read the full review:  http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/04/books/04kaku.html?_r=1

A MERCY.
Toni Morrison.
Hardcover: Knopf, 2008.
Buy now [ Doulos Christou Books $20 ] [ Amazon ]